A collective voice for literature and languages in Scotland

Libraries Matter – help spread the word

CILIP in Scotland is running a new campaign – Libraries Matter – in the lead up to the local government election in May – and needs your help! 
 
The campaign focuses on school and public libraries and involves two main activities – contacting those standing for election and asking them to support libraries if elected and also raising the profile of the campaign’s key messages via the press and social media.
To join in with the campaign and spread the word that Libraries Matter you can:
 
1. Share the campaign details and link with any wider networks you have: http://www.cilips.org.uk/advocacy-campaigns/campaigns/libraries-matter/
 
2. Provide a quote for CILIPS’ campaign support page (these can be provided by organisations or by individuals): http://www.cilips.org.uk/advocacy-campaigns/campaigns/libraries-matter/libraries-matter-campaign-support/
 
3. Post a picture of yourself, your staff and/or members of the public you may work with holding a ‘#LibrariesMatter’ sign (download from CILIPS’ website here) and post them on Twitter or Instagram with the #LibrariesMatter hashtag.

Graeme MacRae Burnet at The Mitchell Library. Photo: Kirsty Anderson

 For further information please email Sean McNamara or call 0141 353 5637. Follow the campaign on Twitter @CILIPScotland or via the hashtag #LibrariesMatter
 
February 17, 2017

LAS letter to John Swinney MSP, Cabinet Secretary, 13 October 2016

LAS sent the following letter to John Swinney MSP, Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills in response to his letter of 6 October 2016.

Letter of 13 October 2016 to John Swinney MSP, Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills.

Dear Cabinet Secretary

SCHOOL LIBRARIANS IN ARGYLL AND BUTE

Thank you very much for your further letter of 6 October 2016 and for the very useful additional information contained therein.

We note the Scottish Government’s intention to allocate funding from Council Tax reform in 2017-2018 to schools, enabling Head Teachers to decide how best to use the additional funding to meet local school needs. We very much welcome the statement that this will include supporting library provision, which we consider to be such an important part of modern school education.

We shall be writing to COSLA and to the Association of Head Teachers and Deputes (AHDS) to stress the importance of sustaining school libraries with trained school librarians in our schools in order to provide our young people with the highest quality of educational training.

We also welcome the Scottish Government’s current Governance Review on early years and schools education. We shall ensure that the Review is widely circulated among our networks and that our members are encouraged to respond. We shall, of course, also respond on behalf of Literature Alliance Scotland (literaturealliancescotland.co.uk).

Yours sincerely

Ann Matheson, Chair
Donald Smith, Vice-Chair

 

October 13, 2016

Letter from John Swinney MSP, Cabinet Secretary, seeking views on Governance Review

LAS received the following letter from John Swinney MSP, Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills, in which he highlights the recent launch of Empowering teachers, parents and communities to achieve equity and excellence: A Governance Review.

LAS will respond to the online consultation, which ends on 6 January 2017, and we would also urge our readers to submit their views via the above link.

 

Letter of 6 October 2016 from John Swinney MSP, Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills to Literature Alliance Scotland.

Thank you for your further letter of 13 September concerning the proposal to remove librarian posts from schools in Argyll and Bute. As I previously indicated in my response of 18 August the delivery of education including the management of a library service is the responsibility of the local authority and it would not be appropriate for Scottish Ministers to comment or intervene in local decisions.

However, I note your concerns and I would like to assure you that Scottish Ministers are committed to doing everything we can to ensure children and young people get the best start in life. This means we want them to get high quality early learning and childcare before they go to school and the best educations when they are at school.

You may be interested to know that from financials year 2017-2018 the additional £100 million per annum that will be raised each year from our Council Tax reforms will be allocated directly to schools. The allocation will be based on the numbers of children in primary schools and S1-3 in secondary schools who meet the eligibility criteria for free school meals. It is likely that applying this approach will mean that 95% of publicly funded schools will receive funding and Head Teachers will be able to determine how best to use additional funds to meet their local needs, such as library provision.

As you may be aware, the Scottish Government launched a Governance Review of early years and school education on 13 September. This governance review seeks your views on how education in Scotland is run, including who should take decisions in relation to the education of children and young people, and how funding can be made fairer. It also asks about the support teachers and practitioners need to do their jobs well and how this can be improved.

We want to hear views from every part of Scotland – from children and young people, from parents, teachers and practitioners and the wider community. We want to hear from those with a formal role in our education system and those who share a stake in its success. Further information on the Governance Review and events can be found at http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Education/thegovernancereview

There is also the opportunity to respond to the review directly through our online survey at https://consult.scotland.gov.uk/empowering-schools/a-governance-review

Yours sincerely,

John Swinney

 

October 6, 2016

LAS Letter to the Public Petitions Committee in Support of School Libraries

LAS sent the following letter to the Public Petitions Committee of the Scottish Parliament, which convened at the end of September with a new panel, in support of Duncan Wright’s petition on the need for a national approach to save Scotland’s school libraries and ensure access to a school library with a trained school librarian for every child in Scotland.

Letter of 21 September 2016 to Johann Lamont MSP, Chair of Public Petitions Committee

Dear Ms Lamont
PUBLIC PETITIONS COMMITTEE
PETITION PE01581: SAVE SCOTLAND’S SCHOOL LIBRARIES

On 19 December 2015, we wrote on behalf of Literature Alliance Scotland, to the then Chair of the Public Petitions Committee, Mr Michael McMahon, in support of the petition ‘Save Scotland’s School Libraries’, lodged by Mr Duncan Wright. We attach a copy of our letter of 19 December 2015, along with a list of the principal literature organisations in Scotland represented by Literature Alliance Scotland. We wish to submit the following additional comments.

Since we wrote in December 2015, we are gravely concerned that Argyll & Bute Council decided to dispense with all its school librarians in February 2016 and that, despite entreaties from all sides, most prominently from the children and young people of Argyll and Bute, the Council has not yet rescinded its decision and reinstated its school librarians.

Depriving the children and young people of Argyll and Bute, or any other part of the country, of their trained school librarians directly acts against giving them equal opportunities and equal rights. Trained school librarians are an essential part of a modern school. They transform the school library into a place of learning, where pupils can be helped in directing their own reading, learning and research.

Other countries understand the essential part that school librarians and school libraries play in young people’s education. Under the Swedish 2011 Education Act, pupils in Sweden are entitled to a school library staffed by trained school librarians: it is viewed as a child’s right. In Denmark, where its Education Act requires every school to have a school library, school libraries are becoming learning centres where the school librarian, the learning instructor, advises, trains and guides learners in an understanding and knowledge of books and digital information. If we are also ambitious for our children and young people, why would we not follow suit?

Literature Alliance Scotland strongly supports the current emphasis on closing the gap in opportunity between children and young people in different parts of the country, and the aim of giving every child equal life chances on which they can build. There can be no higher aim in seeking to build a fairer and more equal country. The results will help to determine the success that individual young people can make of their lives and will also influence the future success of Scotland. However, to succeed, we will need to work constructively together to avoid a situation where children’s chances continue to depend on where they happen to find themselves in the country, something over which they have absolutely no control.

We implore the Public Petitions Committee to take up the cause of school libraries in Scotland vigorously, and to urge the Scottish Government and the local authorities in Scotland to work constructively together to think about our young people’s futures and save Scotland’s network of school libraries.

Yours sincerely

Dr Ann Matheson, Chair,
Dr Donald Smith, Vice-Chair

Enc. Literature Alliance Scotland Membership

LAS Membership at September 2016
MEMBERS

  • Association for Scottish Literary Studies
  • Association of Scottish Literary Agents
  • CILIPS (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in Scotland)
  • Edinburgh International Book Festival
  • Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature Trust
  • The Gaelic Books Council
  • Moniack Mhor
  • National Library of Scotland
  • Peter Pan Moat Brae Trust
  • Playwrights’ Studio Scotland
  • Publishing Scotland
  • The Saltire Society
  • Scots Language Centre
  • Scottish Book Trust
  • Scottish Language Dictionaries
  • SLAM (Scottish Literary and Arts Magazines)
  • Scottish Society of Playwrights
  • Scottish PEN
  • Scottish Poetry Library
  • Scottish Storytelling Forum
  • Scottish Writers Centre
  • Society of Authors in Scotland
  • Universities Committee for Scottish Literature
  • Wigtown Festival Company
  • Writers’ Guild of Great Britain (Scottish Region)
September 21, 2016

LAS Letter to John Swinney MSP, Cabinet Secretary to support school libraries in Argyll & Bute

LAS sent the following letter to John Swinney MSP, Cabinet Secretary, to support school librarians in Argyll & Bute.

Letter of 13 September 2016 to John Swinney MSP, Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary of Education and Skills.

Dear Cabinet Secretary,
SCHOOL LIBRARIANS IN ARGYLL AND BUTE

Thank you very much for your letter of 18 August 2016, in response to our letter about the decision of Argyll and Bute Council to remove school librarians from schools in Argyll and Bute. We very much appreciate your thoughtfulness in sending such a detailed reply.

Literature Alliance Scotland strongly supports the Scottish Government in its decision to make it a national priority to reduce the attainment gap between children and young people in different parts of the country, and to give every child equal life chances on which they can build. There can be no higher aim in seeking to build a fairer and more equal country. The results will help to determine the success that individual young people can make of their lives and will also influence the future success of Scotland.

Our concern is that decisions such as depriving the children and young people of Argyll and Bute of their trained school librarians act against the national priority of seeking to reduce the country’s attainment gap. Trained school librarians are an essential part of a modern school. They transform the school library into a place of learning, where pupils can be helped in directing their own reading, learning and research. Under the Swedish 2011 Education Act, for example, pupils in Sweden are entitled to a school library staffed by trained school librarians: it is viewed as a child’s right.

To succeed in Scotland, we will need to work constructively together to avoid a situation where children’s chances continue to depend on where they happen to find themselves in the country, something over which they have no control.

With others, we shall continue to make the case for the reinstatement of school librarians in Argyll and Bute to Leader and Councillors of Argyll & Bute Council and press them to rescind their decision.

Yours sincerely,

Ann Matheson (Chair)
Donald Smith (Vice-Chair

September 13, 2016

Response from Argyll & Bute Council to LAS

The following response has been received from Councillor Dick Walsh, Leader of Argyll & Bute Council, to the letter from Literature Alliance Scotland in support of the plea from pupils in Argyll & Bute to retain their school librarians.

 

Dear Literature Alliance Scotland

I refer to your letter of 13th July which follows your communication of 21st April.

I do understand the concerns that you express and it is a matter of deep regret to everyone at Argyll and Bute Council that, like all Scottish councils, due to significant reductions in our funding we are simply no longer able to do all that our communities want us to. The context in which councils have been forced to make very difficult choices has been well publicised and is a matter of fact.

It is important to point out that before making any decisions the council carried out an extensive consultation on Service Choices, which attracted a very high level of response. Although the views expressed during this consultation were, of course, listened to and taken on board where they could be, it was simply not possible to reject all of the savings options.

However, the budget ultimately agreed by council managed to mitigate a large number of the savings options consulted on. It reflected a significant priority given to young people’s services and managed to save over 100FTE jobs. The options which were rejected minimised the impact on teachers, classroom assistants, pupil support assistants, janitors, technicians and others. Unfortunately, changes to library services were areas that had to be looked at. At this stage, any option rejected means that another one must be taken in its place.

That said, libraries will remain in Argyll and Bute schools. Working with Head Teachers and other education staff, we are looking at finding different solutions for the schools in our communities, looking at all aspects including timetabling, handling book stock, and how the library facilities and resources in our schools can be used in the best ways to continue to support pupils’ learning.  This will include closer working with our public library service to assist with resourcing and particular initiatives.  We are taking these steps so that our pupils will be able to continue to use the library facilities in our schools. As part of the budget setting process, the council has also been able to avoid any community library closures and have invested in new community library services on Mull and on Tiree which will operate from the respective schools.

I would repeat our regret at the position in which this council, like so many others, finds itself as a result of significantly reduced funding. However, that regret is matched by our commitment to mitigating as much as possible the impact of the reduced funding,  to look for new ways of working and to continue to do as much as we are able to do for our communities.

 

Councillor Dick Walsh (Council Leader)

Argyll & Bute Council

July 21, 2016
Response from Argyll & Bute Council to LAS

LAS Open Letter to Argyll & Bute Council

This open letter has been sent by LAS members to the Leader and Councillors of Argyll & Bute Council in support of the plea by pupils in Argyll & Bute to their Council to save their school librarians and their school libraries (http://www.cilips.org.uk/news/2016/6/30/heartfelt-plea-from-argyll-and-bute-pupils-to-keep-their-sch.html).

Letter of 11 July 2016 to Councillor Dick Walsh, Leader of Argyll & Bute Council

Dear Councillor Walsh

ARGYLL & BUTE COUNCIL:  SCHOOL LIBRARIES AND SCHOOL LIBRARIANS IN ARGYLL & BUTE

We wrote on 21 April 2016 on behalf of the members of Literature Alliance Scotland earnestly to ask you to restore the school librarian posts from schools in Argyll and Bute, which had been recommended for withdrawal by a decision of Council earlier in the year.

Now that pupils in Argyll and Bute have recently written to Theresa Breslin, author and current President of the Chartered Institute of Librarians and Information Professionals in Scotland (CILIPs), and to other children’s authors, seeking their support in keeping their school librarians and their school libraries, we are writing again as an alliance of Scotland’s literature organisations to plead with you to rescind this decision.

We will not restate here the case for the importance of school libraries staffed by trained school librarians, as set out in our letter of 21 April 2016, but we firmly stand by all the points made in our letter. We would only point out again that our neighbours in the Nordic countries and in The Netherlands have already recognised and acted upon the essential role that their school libraries and professional school librarians play in encouraging and training pupils to read, investigate, research and, by these means, to attain in the digital age in which we now live.

Scotland has long been admired elsewhere for the strong network of school libraries that was built up across the country over successive decades in the late 1970s, 1980s and early 1990s by dedicated effort, enthusiasm and support from all sides. As you will know, COSLA produced its very important Standards for School Library Services in Scotland in 1998. We are certain that all of us wish to ensure that such an essential service is sustained and maintained for the young people of today and tomorrow and that its fragmentation, which denies opportunity to those affected, is avoided.

The plea from pupils in Argyll and Bute is more eloquent than any words that we can write (http://www.cilips.org.uk/news/2016/6/30/heartfelt-plea-from-argyll-and-bute-pupils-to-keep-their-sch.html).  We implore you to listen to them and to protect the school library service they consider so important to them. The future success of our young people will determine the future success of our country.

We request that our letter is laid before all Councillors in Argyll & Bute Council.

 

Dr Ann Matheson (Chair)                  Dr Donald Smith (Vice-Chair)

July 15, 2016
LAS Open Letter to Argyll & Bute Council

LAS Letter to Argyll & Bute Council about School Librarians

This letter has been sent by Literature Alliance Scotland members to the Leader of Argyll & Bute Council in connection with the decision to withdraw ten school librarians from Argyll and Bute.

Letter of 26 April 2016 to Councillor Dick Walsh, Leader of Argyll & Bute Council

Dear Councillor Walsh

ARGYLL & BUTE COUNCIL: SCHOOL LIBRARIANS

We are writing on behalf of the members of Literature Alliance Scotland earnestly to ask you to restore the ten school librarian posts from schools in Argyll and Bute, which were recommended for withdrawal by a decision of Council earlier this year. Literature Alliance Scotland, which brings together Scotland’s literature organisations, strongly argues for the vital role of school librarians in encouraging young people to read, introducing them to learning, improving literacy, and assisting pupils’ academic attainment and chances in life.

One of the key priorities for Scotland at present is to reduce the attainment gap between children in different areas of our society. The school library is an essential part of this foundation since it is open and equal to all pupils. The trained school librarian, in turn, transforms the library into a place of learning, or a ‘learning environment’, where pupils can be assisted in directing their own reading, learning and research. It is also a quiet and thoughtful place for study which pupils sometimes are not able to find at home, thus placing them at a disadvantage with their more fortunate peers, and the school librarian is there as a guiding and supporting presence.

Research data internationally supports the view that school libraries have a definite positive impact on academic achievement.  In response to the digital age, school library systems internationally are now adapting to meet the likely needs of future generations of young people. The consensus is that school libraries, staffed by professionally qualified librarians, are vital in equipping new generations of pupils, today’s  ‘digital natives’, with the skills they will need in a fast-moving and changing digital world. Some countries have already gone further than Scotland. Denmark, for example, where the Education Act requires every school to have a school library, decided in 2013 to make its school libraries into learning centres where the school librarian, ‘the learning instructor’, advises, trains and guides pupils in the learning skills they require for modern life.

Scotland has long been admired elsewhere for the strong network of school libraries that was built up across the country over successive decades in the late 1970s, 1980s and early 1990s by dedicated effort, enthusiasm and support from all sides. As you will know, COSLA produced its very important Standards for School Library Services in Scotland in 1998. We are certain that all of us wish to ensure that such an essential service is sustained and maintained for the young people of today and tomorrow and that its fragmentation, which denies opportunity to those affected, is avoided.

We understand and sympathise with current financial pressures, but we do urge you to reconsider this decision in the interests of the young people of Argyll and Bute.

 

Dr Ann Matheson (Chairman)                        Dr Robyn Marsack (Vice-Chairman)

 

APPENDIX 1

LITERATURE ALLIANCE SCOTLAND

Membership at April 2016 

  • Association for Scottish Literary Studies
  • Association of Scottish Literary Agents
  • Book Nation/Borders Book Festival
  • CILIPS (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in Scotland)
  • Edinburgh International Book Festival
  • Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature Trust
  • The Gaelic Books Council
  • Moniack Mhor
  • National Library of Scotland
  • Playwrights’ Studio, Scotland
  • Publishing Scotland
  • The Saltire Society
  • Scots Language Centre
  • Scottish Book Trust
  • Scottish Language Dictionaries
  • SLAM (Scottish Literary and Arts Magazines)
  • Scottish Society of Playwrights
  • Scottish PEN
  • Scottish Poetry Library
  • Scottish Storytelling Forum
  • Scottish Writers Centre
  • Society of Authors in Scotland
  • Universities Committee for Scottish Literature
  • Wigtown Festival Company
  • Writers’ Guild of Great Britain (Scottish Region)
April 27, 2016
LAS Letter to Argyll & Bute Council about School Librarians

LAS Statement for CILIPS Manifesto on Libraries 2016

 

Literature Alliance Scotland has contributed the following statement to the Manifesto for Libraries, which is being drawn together by the Chartered Institute of Library Professionals in Scotland (CILIPS) in advance of the Scottish Parliament Election in May 2016.

‘Literature Alliance Scotland firmly believes that libraries and librarians offer the most democratic means of providing citizens with access to knowledge, and that one of libraries’ most essential roles is acting as the nexus between writers and the public, placing literature at the heart of every community, accessible to every citizen.  Publishers perform an essential role in this process. Literature Alliance Scotland strongly wishes to see Scottish books in all of Scotland’s languages acquired consistently by public and school libraries across the country, so that people have access to the best of their national literature at all stages of life.  We believe that this is an opportune time for a fresh consideration of how this can be accomplished because of the coincidence of the recent Creative Scotland literature review, the recent national strategy for public libraries in Scotland and the development of, for example, Scottish Studies within the national Curriculum for Excellence.’

February 29, 2016
LAS Statement for CILIPS Manifesto on Libraries 2016

LAS Response to School Libraries Petition

Literature Alliance Scotland sent the following response in support of the Petition: ‘Save Scotland’s School Libraries’, which is currently being considered by the Petitions Committee in the Scottish Parliament.

Letter of 19 December 2015 to Michael McMahon MSP, Chair of Public Petitions Committee, The Scottish Parliament

Dear Sir

PUBLIC PETITIONS COMMITTEE
PETITION PE01581: SAVE SCOTLAND’S SCHOOL LIBRARIES

We write on behalf of Literature Alliance Scotland, which brings together the principal literature organisations in Scotland as listed in Appendix 1 , in support of the petition ‘Save Scotland’s School Libraries’, which has been lodged by Mr Duncan Wright. We agree with the points made in the petition and strongly support the call for a national strategy for school libraries in Scotland. We would submit the following points:

  1. Literature Alliance Scotland (literaturealliancescotland.co.uk) shares the concern that Scotland’s network of school libraries, staffed by professional school librarians, has been gradually fragmenting and submits that urgent action is required to stem this decline. The process of fragmentation has become more acute in recent years as local authorities have made choices on which services to reduce in response to financial pressures. The result is that Scotland is creating a situation where the school library service young people receive depends on where they live, something over which they have no choice or control. This cannot be the way to plan for the next generation of Scots to have equal opportunities. Scotland was renowned among other European countries decades ago for its strong sustainable networks of both school libraries and public libraries. We should not risk weakening our networks at the very time when we will need them more.
  2. The recent OECD Report, Improving Schools in Scotland: An OECD Perspective, 2015, notes (p.64) that performance in reading in primary and secondary schools has declined from 2012 to 2014. International evidence shows the vital role of school libraries in improving literacy and encouraging reading: it is well known, for example, that school students will often approach the school librarian for assistance rather than a teacher. With Curriculum for Excellence being described as ‘at a watershed’ in the OECD Report, it will be all the more important to have good school libraries available to school students if Scotland is to fulfil its potential and offer a world-class education system. Elsewhere in Europe, Finland attributes its top performance in PISA reading results to its excellent library system. Recognizing the importance of school libraries in this process, steps are currently being taken there to build up existing school library provision to bring it up to the standard of other parts of their library system.
  3. In common with other comparable countries, the Scottish Government has a vision for Scotland to be a world-class digital nation by 2020 (http://www.digitalscotland.org/about-digital-scotland/). School libraries, staffed by professionally qualified librarians, will be vital in equipping the new generation of school students and ‘digital natives’ in Scotland with all the necessary information literacy skills to meet the needs of the changing digital world.
  4. In developing a national strategy for school libraries in Scotland, the opportunity should be taken to examine how other countries are developing their school library systems in response to the digital age and to consider various existing models. For example – Denmark, where the Education Act requires every school to have a school library, decided in 2013 to make its school libraries into learning centres where the school librarian, the learning instructor, advises, trains and guides school students in relation to digital information and printed books. Naturally, Scotland must decide on the model that best suits its own requirements, but a consideration of how other advanced countries are addressing this issue would be illuminating.

We strongly encourage the Scottish Government to support the call to develop a national strategy for school libraries in Scotland to meet the needs of the 21st century, and then to implement the strategy in a sustained and consistent way across the country.

Yours sincerely

Dr Ann Matheson (Chair)

Dr Robyn Marsack (Vice Chair)

January 4, 2016
LAS Response to School Libraries Petition

LAS Letter to Fife Council on Proposed Library Closures

This letter has been sent by Literature Alliance Scotland members to the Leader of Fife Council in connection with the proposed library closures in Fife, now out to local consultation.

Letter of 31 August 2015 to Councillor David Ross, Leader of Fife Council, and copied to Mr Steve Grimmond, Chief Executive of Fife Council.

Dear Councillor Ross

The Fife Council:  Fife Libraries

We are writing on behalf of the members of Literature Alliance Scotland about the proposed closure of sixteen libraries in Fife.  Literature Alliance Scotland, which represents the literature organisations in Scotland, is a strong advocate of public libraries because they are so crucial in providing access to literature, encouraging reading, assisting literacy and improving people’s chances in life.

We very much welcome your decision to hold a consultation with communities in Fife in order to listen to local views, and we are pleased that you have allowed a substantial period of time up to 6 November 2015 for this consultation to take place.

Libraries in Fife have built a strong reputation for serving their communities.  Indeed, nationally and internationally, Fife, as the birthplace of Andrew Carnegie, is synonymous with public libraries. We do understand that the Council is under pressure to make financial savings, and that there are difficult decisions to be taken.  We should like to support you in listening to local people’s views about their public libraries and to lend our voice in encouraging you to maintain a strong viable network of libraries in local communities, so that people who live in Fife can always have a library close at hand to which it is easy for them to travel and to use.

Public libraries provide meeting places where people have access to culture, knowledge and the chance to learn. In weighing your decisions, we invite you to consider the way in which successful countries (the Nordic countries and The Netherlands, for example) are currently actively strengthening and building upon their existing networks of public libraries. They see them as the principal way for their societies to provide local democratic access to knowledge and culture in the digital age.  Libraries provide equal opportunities for everyone, and everyone in our society has a right to choose their own path.

Scotland has long been known for its strong support for public libraries and school libraries, and for the public’s regard for the excellent network of libraries that has already been created for all of us who live here. Despite the financial pressures at this point, we believe that it is crucial that we should try to preserve the best of what has been cultivated over many generations and combine this with the tools of the digital age.  Involving local people and communities in participating with the Council in making decisions about their own libraries is the best way to ensure that libraries can continue to serve people’s present and future needs.

Yours sincerely

Dr Ann Matheson (Chairman)                   Dr Robyn Marsack (Vice-Chairman)

 

APPENDIX 1

LITERATURE ALLIANCE SCOTLAND

Membership at August 2015

  • Association for Scottish Literary Studies
  • Association of Scottish Literary Agents
  • CILIPS (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in Scotland)
  • Edinburgh International Book Festival
  • Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature Trust
  • The Gaelic Books Council
  • Moniack Mhor
  • National Library of Scotland
  • Playwrights’ Studio Scotland
  • Publishing Scotland
  • The Saltire Society
  • Scots Language Centre
  • Scottish Book Trust
  • Scottish Language Dictionaries
  • SLIC (Scottish Libraries and Information Council)
  • SLAM (Scottish Literary and Arts Magazines)
  • Scottish Society of Playwrights
  • Scottish PEN
  • Scottish Poetry Library
  • Scottish Storytelling Forum
  • Scottish Writers Centre
  • Society of Authors in Scotland
  • Universities Committee for Scottish Literature
  • Wigtown Festival Company
  • Writers’ Guild of Great Britain (Scottish Region)

 

August 31, 2015
LAS Letter to Fife Council on Proposed Library Closures