A collective voice for literature and languages in Scotland

CPG on Culture: A Culture Strategy for Scotland

The Cross-Party Group on Culture discussed A Culture Strategy for Scotland at its meeting on Tuesday 5 September 2017. Watch the video of the debate below.

Speakers included:

  • Leonie Bell, Head of Cultural Engagement and Culture Strategy, Scottish Government
  • Allison Gardener, Programme Director, Glasgow Film
  • Lauren Ross, National Youth Arts Advisor, Young Scot
  • Heather Stuart, Chief Executive, Fife Cultural Trust

CPG on Culture, September 2017 from Creative Scotland on Vimeo.

If the video is not showing above, please view the video here.

October 18, 2017

Statement from Emergents Creatives

A statement from Emergents Creatives was released on 13 October as below:

From the 1st November 2017 our contracts with Highlands and Islands Enterprise to deliver, through Emergents, the XpoNorth Writing & Publishing and  XpoNorth Craft, Fashion & Textiles support will end.

Over the past three years we have had the great pleasure of working with some amazing businesses and wonderful creative people, it has been a privilege.

It is anticipated that support for creatives businesses will continue in some form through Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE), to keep up to date with news please sign up for the XpoNorth and HIE newsletters.

Thank you to everyone we have worked with, hopefully our paths will cross again in the future.

Peter Urpeth, Pamela Conacher & Avril Souter

Emergents Creatives Community Interest Company Ltd

October 14, 2017

2017 Saltire Literary Awards shortlist unveiled

Multi-award winning writers and household names James Kelman, Bernard MacLaverty and Denise Mina feature alongside emerging talents Ever Dundas and Kate Hunterin 2017 in the Saltire Literary Awards shortlists, unveiled last night (12th October).

The shortlists for the seven awards that make up the 2017 Saltire Literary Awards were officially announced at an event hosted at the Edinburgh West End branch of Waterstones and featured readings from last year’s winner of the Scottish Book of the Year Award, Kathleen Jamie.

Widely regarded as Scotland’s most prestigious book awards, the Saltire Literary Awards are organised by the Saltire Society, a non-political independent charity founded in 1936 which aims to celebrate the Scottish imagination.

Established writer John Burnside, one of only two poets to have won both the T. S. Eliot Prize and the Forward Poetry Prize for the same book, features in both the Poetry and Fiction Book Awards shortlists. He is up against new voices Em Strang and Jason Donald for the coveted prizes.

A collection of some of the most beautiful and historically significant maps from the National Library of Scotland’s archive, the exploration of the development of Muslim communities in Scotland, highlighting the ongoing changes in their structure and the move towards a Scottish experience of being Muslim, and a collection, covering 500 years of transgressive Gaelic poetry with new English translations all contribute to a rich line-up in the Research and Non-Fiction book of the Year Awards.

The Fiction Book of the Year shortlist features a number of acclaimed authors, including the latest novels from previous Saltire Literary Award winners James Kelman, Bernard MacLaverty and John Burnside. Also featured is Denise Mina,the first woman to win the McIllvanney prize for her shortlisted novel, The Long Drop.

The First Book of the Year shortlist is particularly varied, with beguiling historical tale Goblin by Ever Dundas, the interweaving of crime and taxidermy in Sandra Ireland’s Beneath the Skin alongside the candid life-memoir of an Italian Scot, Anne Pia.

2013 saw the Saltire Literary Awards expanded to see Publishers as well as writers celebrated for their work.

This year sees awards for both publishing companies and individuals at the beginning of their career in the industry.

Established publishers such as Canongate and Birlinn are shortlisted alongside newcomers 404Ink who have had phenomenal success with their first publication Nasty Women, and niche publishers Handspring, while emerging talents, such as Kirstin Lamb of Barington Stoke and Laura Waddell of Harper Collins, have been shortlisted for the Emerging Publisher of the Year Award for their commitment, innovation and adaptability within the industry.

The shortlists for the seven awards for the 2017 Saltire Literary Awards, each accompanied by a cash prize for the winner, are:

 

The winning book from each of the book awards will go on to compete for the coveted Saltire Scottish Book of the Year Award and an accompanying £3,000 cash prize.

The winners of all the Saltire Literary Awards, along with the Ross Roy Medal for the best PhD thesis on a subject relating to Scottish literature, will be formally announced at a special ceremony in Edinburgh on St Andrew’s Day (30 November 2017).

Saltire Society Programme Director, Sarah Mason commented: “As always with the Saltire Literary Awards, the sheer scale, diversity and excellence within the shortlists exemplify the best in Scotland’s literary sphere.

“My congratulations to all our shortlisted writers and publishers. I wish them the very best of luck when the awards are announced at a special ceremony on St Andrews day.”

October 13, 2017

The Bookseller wants your Scottish stories

The Bookseller has announced its very first dedicated Country Focus on Scotland, to run in the 19th January 2018 edition to celebrate Scotland’s publishers and publishing industry.

It will be a specific and dedicated edition on Scotland with news stories, features, charts, analysis, and a preview feature of books released throughout next year.

They are currently holding an open call to publishers, authors, buyers, agents and publisher services throughout Scotland to take part.

It’s a great opportunity to showcase yourselves, as well as new titles, to book buyers, bookshop owners, ecommerce outlets and major publishers throughout Europe and beyond.

Over the next few months, The Bookseller will be calling for the following information:

  • News stories/press releases/trends in Scottish publishing
  • AIs for top titles released between January 2018 and January 2019
  • Bookings for advertising/promotional slots in the edition.

Please email Emma Hare, Senior Account Manager

You can view the Wales Focus here, and the Ireland Focus here.

Information courtesy of Asif Khan of Scottish Poetry Library & The Bookseller

 

October 9, 2017

Poetry by Heart Scotland 2017-18 is open!

Registrations are now open for the 2017-18 Poetry by Heart Scotland competition!

Participation in the competition is free of charge to all schools for S4-S6 pupils, aged 14-18.

To register your school or to ask any questions just email rose.harrison@spl.org.uk to receive your resource pack.

For more information, take a look at our handy Poetry by Heart Scotland guide.

 

Competition structure

Poetry by Heart Scotland has a pyramid structure: class heats are optional if you have lots of keen reciters but all participating schools have an official school competition.

School competition winners participate in regional heats, which this year are taking place in Universities across Scotland. The winners of all the regional heats take part in the national finals in March 2018.

The deadline for schools to register is Friday 3rd November 2017.

The poems

Students have to memorise and perform two poems – one written before 1914 and one after 1914.

One of the poems must be by a Scottish poet or a poet resident in Scotland.

You can find the permitted competition poems free at www.poetrybyheart.org.uk or on the Scottish Poetry library website at our Poetry by Heart Scotland pre-1914 and post-1914 tags.

Why not choose one poem from each website?

Download resources

When you register, SPL will send out a pack by post containing all of the documents you need to run PBHS in your school.You can find them online too here.

 

Information courtesy of Scottish Poetry Library.

 

October 3, 2017

National Poetry Day 2017 – Thurs 28 Sept

National Poetry Day is coming! On Thursday, 28 September, the Scottish Poetry Library (SPL) will take the lead in Scotland in promoting the UK’s annual celebration of poetry and poets.

The theme for National Poetry Day (NPD) 2017 is ‘freedom’.

In addition to providing unique resources to mark the day, the SPL is co-hosting three events and supporting the launch of BBC Scotland’s Poet in Residence.

Poets Don Paterson, Christine De Luca and Hugh McMillan will read at special events to celebrate NPD.

Award-winner Paterson will read in the unique setting of the Jupiter Artland sculpture park outside Edinburgh.

Christine De Luca will mark the end of her time as Edinburgh Makar with the publication of a collection of poems about the capital, Edinburgh: Singing the City, which she will launch at the SPL on NPD.

At the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum in Ayr, Hugh McMillan will perform his own work alongside competition winners from Alloway Primary, who have written their own poems for NPD.

National Poetry Day also marks the launch of BBC Scotland’s Poet in Residence.

Earlier this year, after an open call for submissions, BBC Scotland announced the second poet to take up the post is Stuart A. Paterson (succeeding Rachel McCrum, who held the post in 2015).

The residency, which is four months long and will conclude on Burns Night, begins with Paterson performing his own specially-written poem about ‘freedom’ to mark National Poetry Day.

The poem will incorporate a distinctive local word as part of UK-wide NPD celebrations: on that day, each of the 12 regional BBC areas will broadcast 12 poems by 12 local poets, with each poem inspired by a distinctive local word chosen through a call out for listener suggestions across the country.

The SPL is already making available resources for teachers and readers specially commissioned for 2017’s NPD.

The notes are based on six poems, all on this year’s theme of ‘freedom’, which have been turned into poem postcards.

The poems are in English, Gaelic and Scots, and are available from public libraries in Scotland for free.

The poems chosen include work by Kathleen Jamie and Julia Donaldson.

Audio and educational content – exclusive to the SPL – based on the six poems is available on our website now at http://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/connect/national-poetry-day-2017-freedom.

– ENDS –

For further information, please contact Colin Waters
T: 0131-557-2876 or 0740-052-9150. E:
colin.waters@spl.org.uk

About the Scottish Poetry Library

The Scottish Poetry Library is a unique national resource and advocate for the art of poetry. The SPL is one of three poetry libraries in the UK, but the only one to be independently constituted and housed. The SPL now has over 45,000 items and has recently completed an extensive renovation of its building. Discover more about the SPL and its work throughout Scotland and beyond on the Library’s website: http://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk

About National Poetry Day

National Poetry Day is an annual celebration that inspires people throughout the UK to enjoy, discover and share poems. Everyone is invited to join in, whether by organising events, displays, competitions or by simply posting favourite lines of poetry on social media using #nationalpoetryday. National Poetry Day was founded in 1994 by the charity Forward Arts Foundation, whose mission is to celebrate excellence in poetry and increase its audience. Discover more about NPD: https://nationalpoetryday.co.uk/

 

September 27, 2017

Culture Strategy – engagement details

Last week the Cross Party Group on Culture met to discuss A Culture Strategy for Scotland. Following on from this, please find below a note from Scottish Government colleagues:

Dear colleagues,

Thank you for an interesting and productive meeting at the Cross Party Group on Culture on 5 September.  We really appreciate your ideas, views and the enthusiasm for what a Culture Strategy can achieve.

Please find below some information about the current engagement phase of the development of a Culture Strategy for Scotland. We hope these are just a few of the many ways you, and your peers, colleagues and communities can feed into the conversation.

Our Resource Pack to support stakeholders hosting their own discussions around the Culture Strategy for Scotland, along with details of our planned public engagement events in Paisley, Dumfries & Galashiels have now been published on our website.

Details of further events will be confirmed and added to our webpages in due course.

To find out more about the culture strategy and how to get involved, email culturestrategy@gov.scot, you can also share your views on Twitter by mentioning @culturescotgov and using the hashtag #scotlandscultureconversation, or get involved in our online discussion forum.

Thank you and we hope to hear from you soon.

Kind regards,

The Culture Strategy team

Information courtesy of Cross Party Group on Culture email update.

September 15, 2017

Walter Scott 250 partnerships meeting – 15 Sept 2017

WHAT: Walter Scott 250th Commemorative Year (2021) – partnerships meeting

WHEN: 2pm on Friday 15 September 2017

WHERE: National Museums of Scotland, Edinburgh – Seminar Room, Learning Centre 4.

RSVPAsif Khan, Director, Scottish Poetry Library 

AGENDA

  1. Welcome (2min)
  2. Introductions (5min)
  3. Partner updates/ information share (15-20min)
  4. Programme Development (30-40min)
  • How might the partnership group evolve, and identify key themes for collaborations?
  • Administrative support and resources
  • Identity/brand
  1. Dates and venues of next meetings

Please feel free to share details of the meeting with colleagues or other parties working in culture, heritage, tourism or academia that you think might be interested in attending.

Directions to the Seminar Room Learning  Centre Level 4

  • Please enter the National Museum of Scotland via the street level entrance on Chambers Street and take the stairs or lift to the Grand Gallery on Level 1.
  • Take the Escalator one flight up to Level 3  – where you will see a small shop area and the entrance to our Jacobites exhibition
  • Walk straight past the shop area with Jacobites ticket desk on your left . You will see a small ‘bridge’ walkway leading to an archway . Go through archway and upstairs which lead to  the Learning Centre Level 4.  If you need to take a lift to Level 4 there is a small lift to the right hand side of the stairs.

Information courtesy of Asif Khan, SPL.

September 12, 2017

Denise Mina wins The McIlvanney Prize for Scottish Crime Book of the Year

Congratulations to Denise Mina who won the Bloody Scotland McIlvanney Prize Scottish Crime Book of the Year 2017 for The Long Drop.

It is the first time a woman has won the award.

The award was announced last night (Friday 8 September 2017) at the opening night of Bloody Scotland – Scotland’s international Crime Writing Festival – which runs from 8-10 September 2017 at venues in Stirling.

Lee Randall, chair of the judges said:

“The Long Drop by Denise Mina transports us back to dark, grimy Glasgow, telling the social history of a particular strata of society via the grubby, smokey pubs favoured by crooks and chancers. She takes us into the courtroom, as well, where Manuel acted as his own lawyer, and where hoards of women flocked daily, to watch the drama play out.

Full of astute psychological observations, this novel’s not only about what happened in the 1950s, but about storytelling itself. It shows how legends grow wings, and how memories shape-shift and mark us.

For my money this is one of the books of 2017 — in any genre.”

Information and photo courtesy of Bloody Scotland.

September 9, 2017

Notes on Visions of the Future: Libraries @ Edinburgh International Book Festival

Sunday 27 August 2017, 7.30-9pm, Edinburgh International Book Festival.

Featuring: Julia Donaldson, Pete White, Dr Jenny Peachey, chair: David Chipakupaku

Format: short presentation by each guest, followed by group discussion, then audience questions.

Julia Donaldson, children’s author and Children’s Laureate 2011-2013

Read out two examples of letters from parents who use the libraries in different ways, including the difficulties in accessing ‘hubs’ – rather than smaller local libraries – for some parents. She had heard comments that some librarians didn’t dare speak out: “librarians are not allowed to say, ‘our libraries are doing well'”. Emphasised that although understandable some cuts need to be made in times of financial difficulty, it would be disastrous if buildings were sold and we couldn’t get them back.

Jenny Peachey, Senior Policy and Development Officer, Carnegie UK Trust

Shared stats from Carnegie Trust report ‘Shining a Light: The future of public libraries across the UK and Ireland.’ Showed that although library membership is doing well, frequency of use is down (from 2011-2016), and that there’s a value action gap (i.e.libraries are seen as crucial but are not necessarily being used). Issue of two very different user groups, who need two different messages. There’s an appetite for change amongst the public, including increased council services available in libraries, more events and more cafes). Increased range of books was not seen as a priority for many people. Potential improvements: digital offer, a more tailored offer, which recognises that it’s not a universal/broad service? Also: Create a workplace culture of innovation which empowers library staff and share learning across the jurisdictions, which all have different strengths and weaknesses.

Pete White, Chief Executive of Positive Prison

Pete talked about his experience in the prison system, including being allocated to work in the library during his sentence. Shared key stats including: 80% of prisoners are from the top 5% more impoverished areas. Two thirds of prisoners have a reading age of less than 11, two thirds have mental health issues and two thirds have issues with addiction. Each year 250,000 people have a court report written about them. The prison population remains about steady with approx 19,000 in and out each year. He explained how libraries are the “opportunity to take something forward”, emphasising that they are linked to communication as a whole. The average middle-class household will use around 32,000 words per day, whereas a family with two children and one parent with an addiction is likely to use around 600. “That’s a lot of missing words by the time they grow up”. He ended with “libraries are vital, simple as.”

Further discussion points and key quotations

– importance of recognising that it’s not patronising to teach reading or stories to adults

– discussion of important of libraries to people once released from prison – JP pointed out we could connect the dots.

– JP: Explained that something is being lost in communication, for example many people surveyed said they wanted to be able to reserve books online, which they already can. Also: think about the ‘why’ of libraries when spreading the message, and recognise it’s not a universal message.

– PW: Libraries could “step sideways from tradition” and become more fearless, with more involvement from young people. Can be intimidating to some people.

– JD: Libraries as a physical place v. important – vital role as a community centre.

– JP: “Libraries are the last free, safe, civic space we have.”

– Discussion of the social return on investment, e.g. training volunteers, which means they’re seen as people with the ability to contribute. Importance of quantifying long-term value and preventative spend, e.g. libraries save the NHS millions each year.

– Questions raised about who do we expect to invest in libraries? (US model of philanthropy mentioned). How can they generate money? How to change the social mindset about libraries?

Describe your dream library!

DC: Birmingham! But with all local services still intact.

JD: I love the variety, and how each one is so different.

JP: A library which is immediately welcoming and full of people

PW: Wee free libraries, available to all.

Points from audience discussion

  • Pamela Tulloch (CEO of Scottish Library and Information Council) pointed out that the situation in Scotland is not as dire as often portrayed: new libraries are opening around the country, and it’s important to celebrate the positives.
  • importance of communicating with your local library about what you want
  • use your library, and encourage others, to help the stats.
  • celebrate the diversity of library users, without judgment
  • make sure communicate the contemporary offer to those who don’t value their libraries.

Notes courtesy of Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature Trust.

 

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September 6, 2017

Wigtown Book Festival puts global & local on the same page

  • Over 250 authors will be welcomed to Scotland’s National Book Town in 2017
  • Themes include International Connections, Revolutions, Walking & Talking, Scotland’s Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology
  • New initiatives include free children’s programme on Sunday 1 October
  • Free tickets to young adult and adult events for everyone under 26

The 19th annual Wigtown Book Festival promises more than 250 events and welcomes a multitude of authors and famous names.

This year’s festival, from 22 September to 1 October 2017, includes sessions with leading Scottish authors Andrew O’Hagan and Denise Mina; from the world of sport Judy Murray and jockey Declan Murphy; politicians turned writers Roy Hattersley and Alan Johnson; TV presenter Rick Edwards, journalists Martin BellJeremy BowenGavin Esler and Bridget Kendall; and Palme d’Or-winning screenwriter Paul Laverty (I, Daniel Blake), who grew up in Wigtown and attends the festival for the first time.

The opening evening will see the launch of the Diary of a Bookseller, written by Wigtown bookshop-owner Shaun Bythell. The subject of a bidding war between publishers, the book recounts a year in the life of a secondhand bookshop owner and reads like a cross between George and Weedon Grossmith’s comic classic Diary of Nobody and TV series Black Books. It is one of three books from major publishers to be based in Wigtown and published this year.

At the heart of the 2017 event is a new international strand, World Town, which seeks to bring new voices from abroad to the festival. The programme welcomes overseas writers and commentators to discuss the German elections (24 September) and Catalan referendum (1 October). There are also sessions on the rise of France’s President Macron, the decline of US influence in the world, and how Brexit is seen by our continental neighbours.

As part of this international theme, the Upland/ Spring Fling artists’ residency, now in its 9th year, will welcome Moroccan storyteller Mehdi El Ghaly and photographer Houssain Belabbes to work with their Scottish counterparts Anne Errington and Laura Hudson Mackay. Together they will be exploring the connection between Moroccan and Celtic storytelling traditions.

Artistic director Adrian Turpin comments: “Wigtown welcomes the world. It may be a small town in a remote part of south-west Scotland, but it’s also Scotland’s national book town, visited by an increasing number of book lovers from across the globe, many of whom have chosen to make their homes here.

You don’t have to live in a city to engage with the wider world, especially now that digital technology allows us all to maintain contacts over large geographical distances. It is possible to be truly global and local. We feel that it’s especially important to look outwards at this moment in history. In particular, after the Brexit vote, on both sides of the debate there has been a new urgency to know about our European neighbours.”

Closer to home, the 2017 Wigtown Book Festival also celebrates Scotland’s Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology with Professor Sir Tom Devine. It also looks at the particular contribution that the south-west of the country has made to Scotland’s national story, from Covenanters and the Galloway Viking Hoard, to the works of historian Thomas Carlyle and engineer Thomas Telford.

Taking inspiration from the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution and the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, the 2017 festival will consider technological, social and political revolutions and the forces that drive them, through the works of among others Alec Ryrie (Protestants), Victor Sebestyen (Lenin the Dictator) and Douglas Murray (The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam).

A series of new Walking & Talking events will encourage the exchange of ideas on the hoof, with an aim to refresh the spirit and exercise mind and body. James Canton will recreate ancient Wigtownshire; author of A Book of SilenceSara Maitland, leads a silent walk; taking inspiration from poet Harry Giles, writers Robert Twigger and Jessica Fox find new ways to explore the Galloway Forest Park; while author and farmer Rosamund Young will bring to life her cult book The Secret Life of Cows on a local dairy farm.

There’s also plenty to do not centred on books. This year the festival offers film screenings in the County Buildings, a nightly theatre programme at Scotland’s smallest theatre, The Swallow, and a number of visual arts exhibitions. Music includes Stravinsky’s The Soldier’s Tale, played by Glasgow’s Auricle Ensemble and the fantastic Commoners Choir, whose songs of revolt and dissent are a central part of this year’s Revolutions theme. Wine and whisky tastings will be provided by Nikki Welch and Blair Bowman, while the festival also offers a tour of Galloway’s new gin distillery Crafty and ice-cream maker Cream o’ Galloway. Light relief is provided by comedian turned classicist Natalie Haynes, while the stand-up farmer Jim Smith gives the low-down on rural life. The legendary festival talent competition and ceilidh also return on Saturday 23 September and 30 Septemberrespectively.

Jenny Niven, Head of Literature, Languages & Publishing, Creative Scotland, said: “Congratulations to Wigtown Book Festival on another inventive programme, full of ideas and debate, with exceptional writers from Scotland and beyond. The festival is a key event in Scotland’s cultural calendar, and an important fixture for Dumfries and Galloway.”

Stuart Turner, Head of EventScotland, said: “We are delighted to be supporting Wigtown Book Festival again this year, through our Beacon Programme. Scotland is the perfect stage for cultural events and the festival is one of the most iconic literary festivals in the UK. It’s great to see that this year’s programme is as strong as ever, with household names alongside a strong regional offering. It’s also fitting that during Scotland’s Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology 2017, that the festival will be exploring the region’s past and historic contribution through an exciting programme of talks and events.”

In a packed children’s programme, Abie Longstaff invites you to check into the Superhero Hotel, Mairi Hedderwick tells us what Katie Morag did next, Tony Bonning reveals folk tales from the region, and spells abound inSylvia Bishop‘s magical bookshop world. There will be a tea party for tigers and a Mudpuddle Farm drawing session with Shoo Rayner, while Philip Ardagh explores the world of Moominvalley. Popular children’s authorsVivian French and Debi Gliori host a workshop of superheroes and monsters encouraging creative minds to devise a character and story. This year’s programme also introduces for the first time a range of free events on the final Sunday.

Children’s programmer Anne Barclay said: Our aim is to encourage our youngest festival-goers to read more books, write more stories, draw more pictures and, most importantly, have fun across the festival. We’re incredibly excited about the 2017 Children’s Festival which offers 10 days of engaging and interactive events for the whole family.”

A separate young people’s festival, WTF (Wigtown: The Festival) offers more than 25 free events programmed by young people for their peers, aged 13-25. Writers attending will include Cathy MacphailKiran Millwood HargraveHelen Grant and Brian Conaghan, winner of the Costa Children’s Book Award 2016. The young people’s programme also features advice on creating comics from Gary ChudleighAlan Grant and John McShane, inspirational spoken words with Savannah Brown, a writing masterclass from Nadine Aisha Jassat and workshops that include drawing (with illustrator Shoo Raynor), editing and ceramic design.

– ENDS –

Notes to Editors

  • Booking information – To book tickets call 01988 403222, visit in person at Number 11 North Main Street in Wigtown or buy online at www.wigtownbookfestival.com
  • Website – www.wigtownbookfestival.com
  • Dates of festival– 22 September to 1 October 2017
  • Funders– Wild Foods of Scotland, Creative Scotland, Dumfries & Galloway Council, EventScotland, The Holywood Trust, Engage, Batchworth Trust, Winifred Kennedy Trust, Mr Edward Hocknell, The Korner Family, Sir Iain Stewart, WS Wilson Charitable Trust.
  • With kind thanks– to all volunteers and local businesses who help make the festival every year.

About EventScotland

  • EventScotland is working to make Scotland the perfect stage for events. By developing an exciting portfolio of sporting and cultural events EventScotland is helping to raise Scotland’s international profile and boost the economy by attracting more visitors. For further information about EventScotland, its funding programmes and latest event news visit www.EventScotland.org. Follow EventScotland on Twitter @EventScotNews.
  • EventScotland is a team within the VisitScotland Events Directorate, the national tourism organisation which markets Scotland as a tourism destination across the world, gives support to the tourism industry and brings sustainable tourism growth to Scotland. For more information about VisitScotland see www.visitscotland.orgor for consumer information on Scotland as a visitor destination see www.visitscotland.com.

About Creative Scotland

  • Creative Scotland is the public body that supports the arts, screen and creative industries across all parts of Scotland on behalf of everyone who lives, works or visits here. It enables people and organisations to work in and experience the arts, screen and creative industries in Scotland by helping others to develop great ideas and bring them to life.  It distributes funding provided by the Scottish Government and the National Lottery.
  • For further information about Creative Scotland please visitwww.creativescotland.com.
  • Follow Creative Scotland @creativescots andwww.facebook.com/CreativeScotland

For further information and interview requests contact Matthew Shelley on 07786 704299 or Matthew@ScottishFestivalsPR.Org  

September 1, 2017

Creative Scotland seeks Literature Officer

The following information is taken from Creative Scotland’s website.

Edinburgh
Salary: £26,016 pa plus pension and benefits
Full-time (36 hrs per week), permanent

Creative Scotland is the national development agency for Scotland’s arts, screen and creative industries.

We are looking for a Literature Officer to join us and support Creative Scotland’s work in the context of our 10-year Strategic Plan and our Annual Plan. You will be an active member of the Literature team and will assess and make recommendations on a range of funding applications, projects and funding. You will also be expected to lead on a number of different projects and support the wider work of the Literature Team across a variety of different programmes.

The person appointed will work closely with cultural organisations and other key stakeholders to support the delivery of our work in literature and publishing.

Our ideal candidate will have a successful track record of project management and good knowledge of literature and publishing across Scotland. You will have demonstrable experience and knowledge of the literature sector, experience of readership or literature development including experience of working with a wide and diverse range of writers and literature professionals.

You will also be able to demonstrate experience in carrying out detailed assessments of proposals and producing clear reports and recommendations. Experience and understanding of the arts in Scotland, in particular literature and publishing, combined with strong interpersonal skills is essential. Experience of managing evaluation and monitoring processes is desirable but not essential, as is the ability to develop and establish partnerships both at home and abroad, and demonstrate commitment to our core values.

Closing date for receipt of completed application forms is 12 noon on Thursday 7 September 2017.

Interviews will be held in Edinburgh on Tuesday 19 September 2017. If selected for interview you will be expected to be available on this date.

Download an application form and information pack here.

August 30, 2017

Muriel Spark 100

Are you planning an event to celebrate the Muriel Spark centenary or have an idea for an event you would like to develop?

The Muriel Spark 100 programme aims to raise the profile of Dame Muriel, her work, and her legacy and place her in the centre of the cultural landscape of 2018.

Led by the National Library of Scotland and Creative Scotland with the collaboration of many partner organisations – including BBC, Glasgow University, Scottish Book Trust, British Council, Muriel Spark Society, GFT and Glasgow Women’s Library –  the Muriel Spark 100 programme will celebrate the life and literary achievements of one of Scotland’s finest and most internationally respected writers across the year, through a series of events, including talks, exhibitions, readings, publications and screenings.

They are looking for organisations and practitioners with work in development or who would be interested to mark the centenary in some way. From exhibitions to readings, talks or screenings, the formats and angles for contribution are diverse.

For more information, please contact the Muriel Spark 100 Coordinator, Sabrina Leruste, at s.leruste@nls.uk

August 24, 2017

CPG on Culture: A Culture Strategy for Scotland

The next CPG on Culture will be held on Tuesday 5 September 2017, 5.30pm-8.00pm at the Scottish Parliament in Committee Room 2.

The meeting will look a Culture Strategy for Scotland.  A full agenda will be made available in due course, however we expect the meeting to follow the usual format:

•         5.30pm-6pm                  Social Discussion

•         6pm-6.30pm                  Panel Discussion

•         6.30pm-8pm                  Group Discussion

Unfortunately, due to room capacity we can only accommodate 60 non-MSPs at the meeting. We expect demand to be high so please RSVP to Kirstin.MacLeod@creativescotland.com to secure your spot.

Following the meeting, details of proceedings will be posted on the website

August 16, 2017

Islay Book Festival set for bold start to second decade

When: 29 September–1 October 2017 | Jura Day: 28 September
Where: Various venues across Islay and Jura

 

This autumn, from 29 September to 1 October, Islay Book Festival is aiming to kick-start its second decade in a big way. Its enthusiastic team of volunteers is planning a lively programme of events aimed at increased variety, engagement, and especially fun!

Islay Book Festival first grew out of a book club based in the village of Port Ellen, hosting its first festival in 2006. Islay has since held ten successful festivals in Port Ellen and has hosted a range of famous authors including Val McDermid, Ruth Rendell, Ali Smith, Julia Donaldson, Iain Banks, Chris Brookmyre and Mairi Hedderwick.

In those first ten years, Islay Book Festival firmly established its presence on Islay’s busy events calendar and has also become a feature of the UK’s annual book festival circuit, and it has become a particularly popular festival for authors. Who wouldn’t want a trip to Islay, after all?

As Islay Book Festival approaches its eleventh instalment, the team is taking a fresh approach. The festival is going to be on the move this year, with events happening across Islay in order to make the most of what this fantastic island has to offer and in a bid to reach as many people as possible. The festival is also holding a special Jura day on 28 September.

Highlights will include a crime evening at Islay’s iconic Round Church, historical and contemporary fiction, space exploration, writing workshops, ‘Islay Voices’ local history walks, bookbinding workshops, Gaelic storytelling for children, a Mull Historical Society music and words evening, ‘Whisky Island’ photography, the Islay Poetry Challenge, puppetry, ‘Meet the authors’, wild books, school visits, Bookbug, and no doubt there’ll be some songs along the way. There may also be whisky…

Our line-up of authors in this busy programme of events, for adults and children of all ages, includes Colin MacIntyre (Mull Historical Society), Helen Sedgwick, Sara Sheridan, E.S. Thomson, Pauline Prior-Pitt, Dr Ken MacTaggart, Alan Windram, Barbara Henderson, Linda Macleod, Ryan Van Winkle, Jura local Konrad Borkowski, and Islay’s own Jenni Minto and Les Wilson. Also featured will be Sollas Bookbinding.

For our full programme information, and for more details about our authors and other participants visit our website www.islaybookfestival.co.uk, follow us on Twitter @IslayBookFest or contact a member of our team at islaybookfestival@gmail.com

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August 9, 2017

School Library Strategy development set for Autumn 2017

The Scottish Government is to start developing a School Library strategy this Autumn.

The news was confirmed in a recent response letter to the Public Petitions Committee regarding the ongoing petition by Duncan Wright, Trustee of Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in Scotland (CILIPS), asking for a strategy as part of his ‘Save Scotland’s School Libraries’ campaign.

LAS welcomes the positive news and encouraging step forward in the Scottish Government’s response, which states:

“SLIC (Scottish Library Information Council) will lead the development of the strategy in collaboration with key partner organisations. The strategy will build upon the work undertaken by SLIC with Education Scotland to develop and integrate librarian-focused guidance into the main ‘How Good Is Our School 4’ (HGIOS4) whole school self-evaluation framework.

“Development and engagement on the strategy will begin in the autumn, following the publication of the new HGIOS4 guidance on school libraries.

“It is important that the aims, objectives and content of the strategy are developed in a collaborative way.

“The engagement to develop the strategy will therefore include all key stakeholders, including the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professional in Scotland (CILIPS) and the Association of Directors of Education in Scotland (ADES).

“The aim is for the final strategy to be agreed and published ahead of the 2018/19 school year. The detailed timetable for the work will be developed and agreed with SLIC during the course of summer 2017. Officials will also contact CILIPS and the petitioner himself in order to clarify the timetable and the process to develop the strategy.”
July 4, 2017

Exhibition on libraries’ political & social status @ CCA Glasgow

Press release from CCA Glasgow:

The House that Heals the Soul brings social spaces, publishing resources and library collections from around the world to CCA Glasgow this summer (22 July – 3 September 2017).

This summer’s exhibition at CCA focuses on the political and social status of libraries.

Programmed in collaboration with artist Nick Thurston, CCA’s exhibition spaces will be opened up to house a selection of library and self-publishing resources alongside artworks that look at various histories of – and approaches towards – the protection and presentation of libraries’ collections, infrastructures and users.

The House that Heals the Soul includes artworks that explore the loss of libraries and books, and questions how controlling access to them can be a political strategy of occupation. Alongside typical and atypical library resources, the exhibition will also include a series of artworks examining readers’ relationships to publications, alternative politics of collecting publications, and technologies for disseminating and archiving them. Digital sharing platforms will also have a presence in the space, and there will be a series of talks by artists and practitioners throughout the show exploring our ever-changing relationships with public sites for knowledge development and exchange. The exhibition will support a dialogue around the importance of the librarian as an interlocutor, artist and curator, as well as giving access to CCA’s spaces for visitors to read, view and produce.

Artists and organisations

A wide range of artists and organisations will be part of The House that Heals the Soul including The Book Lovers, Beatrice Catanzaro, Curandi Katz, Sean Dockray & Benjamin Forster, Emily Jacir, My Bookcase, OOMK, Publication Studio Glasgow, The Serving Library, Temporary Services and Nick Thurston.

The Book Lovers is a collaboration between curator Joanna Zielińska and artist David Maroto focused on research into the artist’s novel employed as a medium in the visual arts. The Book Lovers’ entire collection of books will be on display in The House that Heals the Soul. Over 400 publications will be in the gallery – the largest collection in the exhibition – all artist’s novels. The books will be available for people to read within the gallery. The Book Lovers’ participation in The House that Heals the Soul is supported by the Mondriaan Fund.

Beatrice Catanzaro produces public art interventions with a special focus on social and political dynamics. In this exhibition, an installation representing the final outcome of A Needle in the Binding, her long-term research project with former Palestinian prisoners, will be on display. The project began with the prisoners’ book section of the Nablus Municipality Library which hosts approximately 8000 books read by Palestinian political prisoners between 1972 and 1995, alongside 870 hand-written notebooks; it considered access to books in prison and included the conservation of old and neglected books by the former prisoners and Catanzaro.

Curandi Katz (Valentina Curandi and Nathaniel Katz) are an artistic duo who have been working collaboratively since 2008. The Pacifist Library is an ongoing project of diverse interventions, centred on a mobile library articulated in different ways. All the books within the mobile library have a strong focus on ethical concerns and the connection between art and social change. The rucksack used for the nomadic, travelling library in Queens, New York will be on display during this exhibition, along with a selection of books from the project.

Benjamin Forster and Sean Dockray have been developing /dat library/ together, a peer-to-peer library of libraries that is built on top of the decentralised data-sharing tool called dat. Their work in The House that Heals the Soul is a desktop app which disseminates, shares and copies digital libraries. It allows users to add to, and create, their own libraries. It will be displayed on a computer in the gallery, alongside other computers in the space where visitors can access design software, links to artists projects and other online tools.

Emily Jacir is an artist and filmmaker who is primarily concerned with transformation, questions of translation, resistance and silenced historical narratives. Six photographs – extracts from a project called Untitled (fragment from ex libris) – will be on display during this exhibition. ex libris (2010-2012) commemorates the approximately thirty thousand books from Palestinian homes, libraries and institutions that were looted by Israeli authorities in 1948.

Founded in Glasgow in 2014 by artist Cristina Garriga, My Bookcase is a social enterprise that creatively explores the role of the book and its reader in today’s society. In 2017, Katie Reid and Julia Doz joined Garriga to expand My Bookcase across Glasgow, Barcelona and Amsterdam. My Bookcase will host a space in the gallery where books will be shared and exchanged in an informal way, and will present a workshop detailing how the space was produced. Following the exhibition, the exhcange space will be transferred to the bookshelves in the CCA foyer.

One of My Kind (OOMK) is a highly visual, handcrafted small-press printed zine; OOMK is run by Sofia Niazi, Rose Nordin and Heiba Lamara who also host regular creative events. OOMK welcomes contributions from women of diverse ethnic and spiritual backgrounds, and is especially keen to be inclusive of Muslim women. A bookshelf with their publications and zines will be in the gallery, and OOMK will also lead an all-day workshop on creating a publication or book on 1 September.

Publication Studio Glasgow is also an open source printing facility housed at CCA. During The House that Heals the Soul, it will move into the gallery spaces as an open-source resource for self-publishing. CCA and Publication Studio partners – My Bookcase, Good Press Gallery, A Feral Studio and Joanna Peace – will run a series of workshops and inductions, enabling any member of the public to design, print and bind their own book edition.

The Serving Library is an artist-run organisation founded in 2011 to develop a shared toolkit for artist-centred education and discourse through publishing and collecting. The Serving Library commission artworks that respond to text and language including framed prints, photographs, objects and ephemera. More than 100 objects are on display at The Serving Library’s building in Liverpool; a selection of these commissions will come to CCA this summer.

Temporary Services (Brett Bloom and Marc Fischer) started as an experimental exhibition space in Chicago, and now produces exhibitions, events, projects and publications. The Booklet Cloud – forty publications from Temporary Services and Half Letter Press, hung from above – will be installed at CCA. Also available will be booklets from the Self Reliance Library, which collates reference materials and information about books – exploring a multitude of ideas including skills sharing, technologies, design and ecology.

For the show, Nick Thurston will present Drag-Nets, an adjusted re-print of James Joyce’s Ulysses – a book effectively banned in the US in the 1920s. The installation includes a stack of free-to-take dust jackets for censored books, and a single copy of Ulysses with the title, author and dates matching the new Drag-Nets cover. The dust jackets can be taken and creased around any book that one wishes to secretly distribute. The book will be legally registered and any time the cover jacket is seen or the barcode scanned it will identify the volume it conceals as Drag-Nets by Arthur West.

Ainslie Roddick, CCA Curator said: “This exhibition brings together several important projects which look at how knowledge and histories have been shared across, and despite of, borders and regimes of censorship. Our temporary library of libraries will become space for exchange, where the ‘political’ potential of books and texts is explored in many facets.”

Public libraries have become one of the last remaining spaces where people can gather without expectation or requirement. As the future of libraries becomes increasingly precarious, The House that Heals the Soul aims to expand on the potential of libraries as sites of resistance, shelter, preservation, creation and restitution, and to do so in a dynamically public way as a functioning library of libraries.

Viviana Checchia, Public Engagement Curator at CCA said: “Galleries and libraries have something quite significant in common; they both represent a safe and welcoming platform where conversations can happen in a way no other public place can offer. That is one of the reasons we decided to transform our galleries into a social hub consisting of an open exhibition space, a library and a publication studio. We hope this will foster and encourage even greater engagement in our already vivid spaces.”

This project marks the beginning of a series of summer exhibitions in CCA’s main galleries that will open the rooms up as spaces for meeting and exchange, providing the resources and facilities for more activities to be led by our communities.

Francis McKee, CCA Director said: “We are very excited about our forthcoming show – The House that Heals the Soul – which will stretch our regular exhibition format. There will be a series of curated artworks but we are also setting aside space in the main gallery where artists and community groups who responded to an open call will present their own projects. This is an experiment to see if we can introduce a greater degree of autonomy into our exhibition format, testing the role of open source in that context as well as in our partner programme.”

Following an open call for proposals from individuals and groups to contribute library collections, host their own events or use the gallery as a space to meet during The House That Heals the Soul, a related programme of events has been created. Events will take place throughout the run of the exhibition.

The House that Heals the Soul

The Book Lovers, Beatrice Catanzaro, Curandi-Katz, Sean Dockray & Benjamin Forster, Emily Jacir, My Bookcase, OOMK, Publication Studio Glasgow, The Serving Library, Temporary Services & Nick Thurston

Saturday 22 July – Sunday 3 September 2017

Preview: Friday 21 July, 7pm-9pm

Tue-Sat: 11am-6pm // Sun: 12noon-6pm // Free

Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, G2 3JD

For full details, please see www.cca-glasgow.com

Events:

The Book Lovers, Not a Concept but a Story – talk

Sat 22 Jul, 1pm, CCA Galleries, Free on the door

Yon Afro, In Our Own Words – workshop

Sun 13 Aug, 6pm-8pm, Free but ticketed

OOMK workshop

Fri 1 Sep, 11am -3pm, Free but ticketed

Artists Self-Publishing Book Fair

Sat 2 Sep, From 11am, Free on the door

My Bookcase – Meeting Point workshop

Sat 2 Sep, 1pm-3.30pm, Free but ticketed

Ten Books workshop with Sarah Forrest and Amy Todman

Sat 2 Sep, 4.30pm-6pm, Free but ticketed

My Bookcase Small Talk – discussion event

Sun 3 Sep, 1pm-2.30pm, Free but ticketed

/Ends

For more information, images or interviews, please contact Julie Cathcart, Communications Manager, CCA – julie@cca-glasgow.com / 0141 352 4911.

Notes to Editors

About CCA: The Centre for Contemporary Arts, on Glasgow’s Sauchiehall Street, has been a hub for visual art, film, performance, festivals and literature since 1992 and celebrates its 25th anniversary this year. Previously home to The Third Eye Centre, the building is steeped in history and the organisation has played a key role in the cultural life of the city for decades. CCA’s year-round programme includes exhibitions, film, music, literature, spoken word, festivals, and talks. With building admissions of 335,650 in 2016-17, the venue hosted 253 programme partners across 1,075 events and 26 festivals. CCA also provides residencies for artists in the on-site Creative Lab space, as well as working internationally with residencies in Quebec, Palestine and the Caribbean. CCA curates six major exhibitions a year, presenting national and international contemporary artists, and is home to Intermedia Gallery which showcases emerging artists. CCA is supported by Creative Scotland, Glasgow Community Planning Partnership and Esmée Fairbairn Foundation. www.cca-glasgow.com

About The Book Lovers: Established in 2011, The Book Lovers is a collaboration between curator Joanna Zielińska and artist David Maroto. It is focused on research into the artists’ novel employed as a medium in the visual arts, exploring the different ways in which the artist’s novel is not a literary artefact but a medium employed by visual artists, exactly as they employ installation, video or performance. Its base is the creation of a collection of artists’ novels with a parallel online database, which is complemented by a series of exhibitions and public programmes, pop-up bookstores and publications. The Book Lovers work in partnership with a number of art institutions including M HKA, Museum of Contemporary Art in Antwerp; de Appel, Amsterdam; Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; EFA Project Space, NYC; Sternberg Press; Fabra i Coats – Centre d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona. Currently The Book Lovers are commissioning the creation of a new artist’s novel, called Tamam Shud, by Alex Cecchetti, produced by the Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art, Warsaw. The two-year long art project features five episodic performances and an exhibition intended to create a murder mystery narrative to be published in early 2018. www.thebooklovers.info

About Beatrice Catanzaro: Beatrice Catanzaro is an artist and researcher. Her projects create situations for shared learning and public participation and have been developed and hosted throughout Europe, the Middle East, and India. Between 2010 and 2015, Catanzaro lived in Palestine and initiated the women’s centre Bait al Karama (House of Dignity), an ongoing long-term community project (social enterprise) in Nablus. Her work has been exhibited in numerous international venues including MART of Rovereto (Italy) in the context of Manifesta 7, Espai d’Art Contemporani de Castelló (Spain), Jerusalem Show by Al-Ma’mal Foundation (Jerusalem), Land Art Biennial (Mongolia), CIC Cairo (Egypt), Quadriennale of Roma (Italy). Catanzaro taught practice-based research at the International Art Academy of Palestine in Ramallah from 2012 and 2015. Invited lectures and participation in seminars includes: the Creative Time Summit ‘Curriculum’ at the Venice Biennale; Campus in Camps educational program at the Dheisheh refugee camp in Bethlehem (Palestine); the University of Hyderabad and at the CEPT University for Architecture, Urban Planning and Interior Design, Ahmedabad (India). She is currently a doctoral candidate at the Oxford Brookes University in Social Sculpture.

About Curandi Katz: Valentina Curandi (Cattolica, RN, 1980) and Nathaniel Katz (Woodstock, CA, 1975) have been working collaboratively as Curandi Katz since 2008. Their work explores modes of delegation and imposition underlined by forms of negotiation and collaboration. It acts in the space in which interactions with different ecosystems form, operating between linguistic inscription and incorporation into the functions and internal dynamics of different bodies. The artists were awarded the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship (USA) and ICEBERG (IT). They have shown work at 16ma Quadriennale di Roma (IT), Yermilov Art Centre (UKR), Konstfak Stockholm (SWE), Motherlode Centrale Fies (IT), Passavamo sulla Storia Leggeri (IT), Rural in Action (IT), Bienal del Fin del Mundo (AR), ARTSTAYS (SLO), Hangart (IT), Kunstraum Munich (D), Galleria Artericambi (IT), ar/ge kunst (IT), MAC Lissone (IT), Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale (FL), VIAFARINI (IT), MOMA P.S.1 (NY), Flux Factory (NY), Center for Book Arts (NY), neon>campobase (IT), MEDRAR (EGY), Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Villa Croce (IT), Moscow Biennial for Young Art (RU).

About Sean Dockray & Benjamin Forster: Benjamin Forster and Sean Dockray live in Australia, 876km apart. They have rarely met in person, but they have worked on similar things in similar ways (e.g. a.library, AAAARG.ORG, Frontyard and the Frontyard Library, The Public School). Based on mutual trust rather than any formal notion of collaboration or collectivity, they have been developing /dat library/ together, a peer-to-peer library of libraries that is built on top of the decentralised data-sharing tool called “dat”. Like a library, dat is as much a community as it is a protocol; and as an open source project /dat library/ resists simple attributions of authorship, indebted as it is to this broader community.

About Emily Jacir: Emily Jacir is an artist and filmmaker who is primarily concerned with transformation, questions of translation, resistance and silenced historical narratives. Her work investigates personal and collective movement through public space and its implications on the physical and social experience of trans-Mediterranean space and time. She lives and works around the Mediterranean. Jacir is the recipient of several awards, including a Golden Lion at the 52nd Venice Biennale (2007); a Prince Claus Award (2007); the Hugo Boss Prize (2008); and the Herb Alpert Award (2011). Jacir’s works have been in important group exhibitions internationally, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA); Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin; dOCUMENTA (13) (2012);  Venice Biennale (2005, 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2013); 29th Bienal de São Paulo, Brazil (2010); 15th Biennale of Sydney (2006); Sharjah Biennial 7 (2005); Whitney Biennial (2004); and the 8th Istanbul Biennial (2003). Jacir’s recent solo exhibitions include Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2016); Whitechapel Gallery, London (2015); Darat il Funun, Amman (2014-2015); Beirut Art Center (2010); and Guggenheim Museum, New York (2009).

About My Bookcase: Founded in Glasgow in 2014, My Bookcase is a social enterprise that creatively explores the role of the book and its reader in today’s society. My Bookcase focuses on the book as a social tool for the exchange of knowledge – creatively deconstructing and exploring this object through art, architecture, design and literature, as well as with communities beyond these fields. The project’s starting point is an online platform, My Bookcase Platform, where readers open up their personal libraries to share their books in a free and participatory way. The initiative is supported by a network of meeting points – selected spaces in the city encouraging the sharing of books and encounters between readers. The aim of My Bookcase is to empower the reader by offering a creative space to unfold the knowledge gathered through private readings and bring individual knowledge into shared experience to support collective intelligence. My Bookcase was founded in 2014 by artist Cristina Garriga. In 2017, Katie Reid and Julia Doz joined Garriga to expand My Bookcase across the cities of Glasgow, Barcelona and Amsterdam. mybookcase.org

About OOMK: One of My Kind (OOMK) is a highly visual, handcrafted small-press publication. Printed biannually, its content pivots upon the imaginations, creativity and spirituality of women. Each issue centres around a different creative theme, with more general content exploring topics of faith, activism and identity. As well as producing a printed zine, OOMK is present online and hosts regular creative events including DIY Cultures. While OOMK welcomes contributions from women of diverse ethnic and spiritual backgrounds, it is especially keen to be inclusive of Muslim women. Studio OOMK is a design studio run by the editors of OOMK Zine, working with a host of clients, in particular galleries and museums, to host workshops, produce publications and undertake various projects. OOMK is run by Sofia Niazi, Rose Nordin and Heiba Lamara. oomk.net

About Publication Studio Glasgow: Publication Studio Glasgow is a collaboration with partners My Bookcase, Good Press Gallery, A Feral Studio and artist Joanna Peace. It is a publishing enterprise founded in 2009 in Portland, Oregon – an international network of sibling studios, with a presence in thirteen cities including New York, London, Rotterdam and now Glasgow. Publication Studio prints and binds books one at a time on-demand, creating original work with artists and writers. It is a laboratory for publication in its fullest sense – not just the production of books, but the production of a public. It is also an open source printing facility housed at CCA. Every few weeks, Publication Studio Glasgow runs inductions to teach people how to use the equipment, who can then book the space to make a small run of their own books. For more information and to book an induction email publicationstudioglasgow@gmail.com

About The Serving Library: The Serving Library is an artist-run non-profit organisation founded in 2011 to develop a shared toolkit for artist-centered education and discourse through related activities of publishing and collecting. It comprises a biannual journal (Bulletins of The Serving Library) published both online and in print, an archive of framed objects on permanent display, and a public programme of workshops and events. The Serving Library currently resides at Exhibition Research Lab, School of Art & Design at Liverpool John Moores University, where the gallery space serves as a satellite seminar room to host occasional classes for university-level art, design and writing students from schools across the world, as well as a regular series of public talks and exhibitions building upon the library’s archival material. servinglibrary.org

About Temporary Services: Temporary Services is Brett Bloom and Marc Fischer, and is based in Ft. Wayne (IN) and Chicago. Salem Collo-Julin worked with Temporary Services from 2001-2014. Temporary Services has existed, with several changes in membership and structure, since 1998, and produces exhibitions, events, projects and publications. Temporary Services started as an experimental exhibition space in a working class neighborhood of Chicago. The name directly reflects the desire to provide art as a service to others. It is a way for us to pay attention to the social context in which art is produced and received. Having “Temporary Services” displayed on the window helped to blend in with the cheap restaurants, dollar stores, currency exchanges and temporary employment agencies on the street. It was not immediately recognisable as an art space. This was partly to stave off the stereotypical role it might have played in the gentrification of the neighborhood. Experiencing art in the places we inhabit on a daily basis remains a critical concern. It helps to move art from a privileged experience to one more directly related to how we live our lives. A variety of people should decide how art is seen and interpreted, rather than continuing to strictly rely on those in power. Temporary Services collaborate amongst themselves and with others, even though this may destabilise how people understand the work. Temporaryservices.org

About Nick Thurston: Nick Thurston (b.1982, UK) is a writer and editor who makes artworks. He is the author or co-author of several books and editor of many more. Recent exhibitions include Reading as Art at Bury Museum & Sculpture Centre, 2016; Reading Matters at Printed Matter, New York, 2016 and Hate Library at Foksal Gallery, Warsaw, 2017. Since 2006, he has been co-editor of publishing collective Information As Material, with whom he was Writer in Residence at the Whitechapel Gallery, London, 2011-12. In 2014, he was Artist in Residence at the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin and in 2016 he was Visiting Research Fellow in Contemporary Writing at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. He teaches at the University of Leeds.

June 28, 2017

Portobello Prize for non-fiction launches

The inaugural 2017 Portobello Prize celebrates the art of narrative non-fiction and aims to discover and launch a star of the future.

The 2017 #PortobelloPrize – from Portobello Books – is open to any UK citizen or UK-based writer who is unpublished in book form.

Entries can be submitted until midnight 16th October 2017.

The winner will receive a competitive book deal, representation by C+W, and publication by Portobello Books, backed by a dynamic marketing and publicity campaign, with promotional support from legendary independent bookstore, Foyles.

Judging panel:

  • Ben Rawlence (author of City of Thorns)
  • Sharmaine Lovegrove (film & TV scout and literary editor)
  • Sophie Lambert (Literary Agent, C+W)
  • Marion Rankine (book-buyer at Foyles)
  • Laura Barber (Publishing Director, Portobello Books).

More info and how to enter.

Questions: prize@portobellobooks.com

@PortobelloBooks

Info from Portobellobooks.com

June 27, 2017

Peggy Hughes appointed as new LAS Chair

The Board of Trustees of Literature Alliance Scotland is delighted to announce Peggy Hughes as its new Chair.

Peggy Hughes. Photo: Chris Scott

The appointment was unanimously approved at our Members’ and Trustees’ meeting on 17 May at University of Stirling where Ms Hughes, who directs Literary Dundee, was welcomed with a round of applause by the membership.

Peggy Hughes, said: ‘I’m truly delighted to be joining Literature Alliance Scotland as chairperson, and really looking forward to building on the work of the inimitable Ann Matheson, and working in concert with wonderful colleagues across our literary community – it’s like getting the chance to conduct a world class orchestra!

“Literature Alliance Scotland plays such a vital and exciting role in uniting writers, publishers, educators, librarians and literature organisations and presenting a strong collective voice for Scotland’s literature.

“It’s a challenging global picture, but literature and stories have a huge part to play in understanding ourselves and in bridging understanding with others, and LAS is central to making those stories and voices travel. I can’t wait to get stuck in.”

Ms Hughes has a wealth of experience within Scotland’s literature community, working in various roles over the years at StAnza, Edinburgh International Book Festival, Scottish Poetry Library and Edinburgh City of Literature Trust before joining Literary Dundee, at the University of Dundee, as Director in July 2013 where she produces and delivers the annual Dundee Literary Festival, coordinates the Dundee International Book Prize and a variety of events, publications and projects throughout the year.

She also founded Edinburgh’s Electric Bookshop and co-founded the West Port Book Festival. In addition to her new role leading the LAS Board of Trustees, Ms Hughes is a board member of Craigmillar Literacy Trust and regularly chairs events at literary festivals and panels.

Donald Smith, LAS Vice-Chair, who led the recruitment process for the position, said: “Peggy’s experience, vigour and demonstrable track record makes her the best person with the will, capacity and opportunity to lead LAS for the next two years.”

-Ends-

May 23, 2017

Emergents joins LAS

We’re delighted to announce that Emergents CIC Ltd, which supports the development of writing and publishing in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, has become a Network Associate of LAS.

Emergents works to develop writing and writers with real commercial potential in the contemporary publishing, self-publishing and digital industries, and aims to assist the growth and sustainability of the publishing sector in the region.

Funded by Creative Scotland, HIE and ERDF, Emergents is a key part of HIE’s support strategy for the creative industries in the Highlands and Islands.

Peter Urpeth, Director (Writing & Publishing), will be the company’s representative for LAS and we look forward to welcoming him to the AGM in November 2017.

Follow them on Twitter @emergentwriters and on Facebook

 

April 19, 2017

Indie Authors’ World joins LAS

We’re delighted to welcome Indie Authors’ World, a provider of self-publishing services, training and support, as a new Network Associate member of LAS.

Founders Kim and Sinclair Macleod first created Indie Authors Scotland, which grew and developed into Indie Authors World through the desire to create practical and economical ways for writers to get their books on sale in a supportive and friendly environment.

Over the past four years, the business has helped indie authors from Scotland, UK, Australia, Canada, USA and Germany publish more than 60 books across fiction, non-fiction, biography and poetry.

 

Follow them on Twitter @IndiAuthorWorld or on Facebook.

 

March 17, 2017

2022: Year of Scotland’s Stories

As part of Scottish Tourism Week, Cabinet Secretary for Culture, Tourism & External Affairs, Fiona Hyslop, announced today that 2022 will be the Year of Scotland’s Stories.

Scotland’s Stories will be a showcase of the country’s rich literature, film, oral traditions and myths and legends.

It will be the first themed year on literature, which our members have been asking for for a long time and we’re delighted that today’s announcement comes with good time to plan for a stand-out year.

Huge thanks to everyone who helped make this happen.

The full announcement from the Cabinet Secretary is here. VisitScotland’s press release is here.

March 15, 2017

Libraries Matter – help spread the word

CILIP in Scotland is running a new campaign – Libraries Matter – in the lead up to the local government election in May – and needs your help! 
 
The campaign focuses on school and public libraries and involves two main activities – contacting those standing for election and asking them to support libraries if elected and also raising the profile of the campaign’s key messages via the press and social media.
To join in with the campaign and spread the word that Libraries Matter you can:
 
1. Share the campaign details and link with any wider networks you have: http://www.cilips.org.uk/advocacy-campaigns/campaigns/libraries-matter/
 
2. Provide a quote for CILIPS’ campaign support page (these can be provided by organisations or by individuals): http://www.cilips.org.uk/advocacy-campaigns/campaigns/libraries-matter/libraries-matter-campaign-support/
 
3. Post a picture of yourself, your staff and/or members of the public you may work with holding a ‘#LibrariesMatter’ sign (download from CILIPS’ website here) and post them on Twitter or Instagram with the #LibrariesMatter hashtag.

Graeme MacRae Burnet at The Mitchell Library. Photo: Kirsty Anderson

 For further information please email Sean McNamara or call 0141 353 5637. Follow the campaign on Twitter @CILIPScotland or via the hashtag #LibrariesMatter
 
February 17, 2017

LAS seeks new Chair

LAS seeks to appoint a new Chair in early 2017 and welcomes expressions of interest from potential candidates. A description of the position and the candidate qualities sought is attached below. The person appointed will have a sound knowledge of Scottish literature and languages at a local, national and international level, familiarity with the principles and practice of leadership and management and knowledge of the principles of corporate governance.

The Chair serves for a term of three years, which is renewable for a further term of three years.

As Literature Alliance Scotland is a SCIO (Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation), the position is unremunerated but expenses reasonably incurred in connection with carrying out the duties of Chair will be met.

How to Apply
If you are interested in putting your name forward for this position, please send a CV and covering letter by email to Dr Donald Smith, Vice-Chair on admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk by 31 January 2017.

Key Responsibilities

  • Advance the interests of Scottish literature and languages at a local, national and international level.
  • Fulfil a strong ambassadorial role for Scottish literature and languages in consultation with members of Literature Alliance Scotland.
  • Provide leadership to the Board of Trustees and Members of Literature Alliance Scotland and ensure that Trustees and Members fulfil their duties and responsibilities as a SCIO (Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation).

Main Duties

  • Provide leadership to the Board of Trustees and Members in setting the future strategy for Literature Alliance Scotland.
  • Ensure that the values and objectives of Literature Alliance Scotland are regularly reviewed.
  • Chair Board and Member meetings and oversee an effective administration.
  • Represent Literature Alliance Scotland and promote the organisation to government, local authorities, external partners, stakeholders and funders.

Candidate Qualities

Knowledge

  • A sound knowledge of Scottish literature and languages at a local, national and international level
  • Familiarity with the principles and practice of leadership and management
  • Knowledge of the principles of corporate governance

Experience

  • Active involvement with Scottish literature and languages in one or more fields
  • Acquaintance with leadership and management within the public sector
  • Familiarity with working collectively and in partnership

Skills

  • Strategic thinking and problem solving
  • Strong ambassadorial skills
  • Sound independent thinker and ability to think creatively
  • Ability to work as a member of a team
  • Managing finance and accounts
  • Excellent spoken and written communications skills

Personal Qualities

  • Strong commitment to the values and objectives of Literature Alliance Scotland

Other Factors

  • Convenient access to Edinburgh is desirable since most (but not all) meetings are held there.
January 10, 2017

Development meeting for overseas literature promotion set for January 2017

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LAS is set to hold a development meeting in January 2017 as part of the next steps agreed with delegates at their International Literature Summit in November 2016.

The meeting will take place on Wednesday 25 January 2017 from 12-2pm at the Saltire Society in Edinburgh and welcomes individuals and organisations with a remit in the international promotion of Scotland’s literature, languages & books.

Following consensus at the International Literature Summit for a joint service between organisations for overseas promotion, the meeting aims to work out the detail with a practical, pragmatic and focused universal approach.

Please register here

Summary notes on the Literature Summit can be read here.

December 15, 2016

Headline notes on the International #LiteratureSummit 2016

We were delighted to welcome an impressive turnout of literary delegates and speakers – writers, publishers, literature organisations, literary agents, literary editors, translators and academics – to the Summit on the International Promotion of Literature & Books 2016 on 23 November for what many have described from the feedback as a stimulating discussion. We’re grateful to all the speakers, including Alasdair Allan MSP, Minister for International Development & Europe who delivered the opening address, and delegates for their contribution. Photos of the day are here.

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Dr Alasdair Allan MSP.

Below are the headline notes, including, at the end, the consensus reached and the agreed key action, on which we will move forward quickly, so watch this space!

Headline Notes

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Keynote – Dr James Robertson

  • Joined up thinking and acting to be done
  • Are Scottish Literature and Languages part of soft diplomacy’s toolkit and if so to build what, with whom and for what purpose?
  • With less money available, need to spend wisely and efficiently
  • Economically and ecologically best to send writers overseas? – use resources differently e.g. podcasts, more translations
  • How to judge success? Number of book sales or literary prize wins?
  • ASLS good example of how patience in building international contacts can yield rich outcomes over a long period
  • What do mean, whom do we mean by Scottish writers?
  • What does Scottish Literature look like from elsewhere?
  • If literature represents the kind of society from which it grows, historically, Scottish Literature tells the world a very different story to English Literature
  • Need to balance literary identities and aspirations with practicalities and the realities of the political world.

Session One – Literature Organisations’ Perspective: what needs to be done?

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Fiona Brownlee, Brownlee Donald Associates for Association of Scottish Literary Agents (ASLA)

  • Focus on best use of resources
  • Fund authors to travel with dedicated promotion
  • Point of contact in international / foreign offices, offering / driving coherent promotional support for authors
  • Promotion and book appearances tied together e.g. Saltire offices in NYC
  • Join up disparate organisations

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Duncan Jones, Director, Association for Scottish Literary Studies (ASLS)

  • University network as natural ambassadors for Scottish Literature, engaging with students internationally
  • Readers regularly not realising strong Scottish writers are actually Scottish
  • Scottish universities to recognise Scottish Literature alongside other courses
  • Availability of texts is vital, online and at home, classic texts to be brought back in to publication

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Eleanor Pender, Communications Executive, Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature Trust

  • Balance of home and abroad working together to create a strong basis for international collaboration

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Nick Barley, Festival Director, Edinburgh International Book Festival

  • Authors needs to travel to develop relationships
  • Global relationships and exchange are vital in promoting Scottish Literature – it’s an ongoing conversation

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Marion Sinclair, Chief Executive, Publishing Scotland

  • Coming from a position of strength in collaborative working
  • Build on existing assets to work better internationally
  • Recommends new joint venture / service from a number of organisations rather than new body in charge – with dedicated staff to handle work

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Asif Khan, Director, Scottish Poetry Library

  • Sustainability – share authors and writers abroad, visiting poets and residencies, translation workshops and media collaborations
  • Joined up thinking
  • Historically Scottish poetry is more outward looking
  • Synchronise Scottish Poetry to where it’s looking out to the world

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Session 2: Public Agencies & Tourism Panel

Chair: Magnus Linklater; Panellists: Jenny Niven, Creative Scotland (JN), Cortina Butler, British Council – Literature (CB), Jeni Oliver, SDI (JO), James McVeigh, Festivals Edinburgh & Edinburgh Tourism Action Group (JMcV).

JN: important to consider what success looks like. Four key themes of CS’ framework for international approach: import, export, cultural exchange, and cultural diplomacy.

JMcV: Arts and tourism separated by semantics – visitors = readers, audience. Literary tourism generally packaged as heritage as easier to engage with place marketing. Challenge is how tourism sector works with contemporary writers. Engage with organisations to find the ‘hook’.

Soft power
JN: Cultural diplomacy and relationships are fluid. Difficult to match countries and agency objectives with artists’ creative suggestions and where they want to go.

Tourism
JMcV: Readers are the audience. Engage with the cultural tourism offering of all kinds of countries.

CB: We need to understand and recognise the differing priorities for organisations, agencies, writers, publishers etc. to find where they overlap – the sweet spot.

Branding a culture
JO: Need to understand what starts the conversation with a country, which varies from country to country. Need to start thinking about its audiences, tourists, readers – where do we want to engage? Don’t rely on what is already out there and the known writers. Need to do more about content that resonates here – different across Scotland. Businesses here are identifying new ideas, taking on the risk and offering support with that risk.

CB: English and Scottish book activity looks for a range of writers from across the country, depending on what the project is looking for.

JO: What is your audience, where are they and what is the hook? How to bring it all together?

JN: An atmosphere where organisations are championing each other’s efforts. Need for a collective mechanism to bring these efforts together. New agency not feasible, but tangible efforts can be made. Persuade Scottish media to focus on the arts more. Work in development visibility on increasing Scottish arts in the media.

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Session 3: Writers’ Panel – what additional support do writers need?

Chair: David Robinson; Panellists: Ronald Frame (RF); Gavin Francis (GF), Vivian French (VF) and Kathleen Jamie (KJ).

VF: When do you decide that an author is Scottish and that their work is Scottish?
Children’s picture books are a massive export. 80% of books in a Copenhagen bookstore originated from the UK. Live aspect is very important for children’s books.

GF: Attending events or travelling has been under different provisos, different organisations and mechanisms. It’s very precarious, often fortuitous. It would be useful for authors if they knew that British Council would help fly them if there was a bursary or more information available.

RF: Scottish fiction doesn’t seem to sell well. It sells well in the US but less so here.

KJ: Scotland is a country of landscape, not of crime.

VF: With the children’s book world, it’s our books going out but not many books coming in.

GF: There are hopeful signs with basic minimums to pay writers travelling to events. Most writers have a couple of jobs to support themselves too.

Jenny Niven mentioned Open Project Funding less than £5k – smaller pots of money available with quicker turnaround.

Key issues: writers and bureaucracy for applications and rights issues, points raised about the issue of selection of writers, perception that the same writers get chosen for agency projects, writers not being aware of how their work is used or what organisations offer.

Also highlighted was International Literature Showcase in Norwich, which CS is partner funding.

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Session 4: Publishers’ Panel – what more could be done internationally?

Chair: Jenny Brown; Panellists: Hugh Andrew, Birlinn (HA); Andrea Joyce, Canongate Books (AJ); Katy Lockwood-Holmes, Floris Books (KL-H); Adrian Searle, Freight Books (AS); Rosemary Ward, Gaelic Books Council (RW), Robert Davidson, Sandstone Press (RD).

AS: Sell more books to International publishers, more resource to Publishing Scotland to expand on success. Foundation of success based on books that have done well in their own country – over 10,000 copies. Build the market in Scotland. Pressure the media for support.

KL-H: Children’s part of Scottish Literature is building readers of the future. Authors & illustrators’ success overseas translates in sales and rights sales.

RD: Action on sales – we have a team in North America selling Scottish books. Face to face contact is key.

AJ: AJ: Key for Scottish publishers to get out and build relationships with international publishers to persuade them to take risk on a new voice and new writer. Need Go See follow up fund, Reverse Fellowship internship.

RW: Co-ordinated initiative to promote writers and authors.

HW: Home market is dysfunctional. If we don’t make any money at home, can’t expand and invest in foreign markets. Need self-sustaining home market.

Cortina Butler, British Council – on looking at other countries – recommended Polish Book Institute as a good example of online resource providing support and information available to writers. Translation needs with marketing component.

AS: Good examples is NORLA, great engagement, success in home market but doing it for 25 years – long term investment.

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Q&A highlights

  • New Books in German – Publishing Scotland produces similar title for Scotland
  • Invite translators to conferences
  • Irish Literature Exchange (name clearly says what it does)
  • Why does Irish diaspora support their books more?
  • Discover books via link with television and film adaptations / improve link with development directors
  • AS: need more independent bookshops – call to remove business rates

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Session 5: Resolutions & Next Steps

Magnus Linklater (ML); Donald Smith (DS); Marion Sinclair (MS)

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Headline discussion points

  • Need for coherence, communication and some co-ordination
  • No desire for uniformity or imposition of one single strategic line
  • Agreement for a shared strategy that encompasses the different aspects and is understood by all
  • How might this be expressed and developed?
  • Joined up thinking – can different bodies and organisations release boundaries in guarding own patch to work in coordination?
  • New agency model may be applicable in the longer term
  • At present, agreed that the model had to be structured co-operation amongst the existing lead organisations working closely with the public bodies and agencies
  • Consensus around the idea of a joint service – jointly between organisations. Detail tba – see key action below
  • Festivals Edinburgh suggested as a possible comparator.

Jeni Oliver, SDI, made a commitment for

  • Further support for Go See Fund for follow-up visits to new markets, showcasing a new product to a new market or looking to build new relationships.
  • More support for Translation Fund for marketing element

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Headline audience discussion
Donald Smith: Mission critical that Creative Scotland support those who already exist so it’s difficult to find new resources for a new organisation.

Jenny Niven: Some seed money is available from Creative Scotland to move things forward.

Joy Hendry: Literary editors and magazines not discussed. No recognition for literary editors’ unique links and relationships on international stage with writer networks. Need formal recognition and input from literary magazines.

Ian Brown: Problem of not overlapping – clear need for more coordinating and communicating within the sector.

Fiona Brownlee: Very positive day. Publishing Scotland and EIBF bring a great deal and should be involved.

James Robertson: Opportunity to promote literature in collaboration with other cultural forms – overlap with music and other art forms, especially film.

Ron Butlin: Need to help Scottish Government understand that the arts are cost-effective PR for Scotland.

Kaite Welsh: Soon to be four literature officers at Creative Scotland – please contact us to ask questions.

Linda Strachan: Authors don’t know what’s going on and how their work is being used. How to communicate information to the grassroots level? It needs to reach the writers and the creative people.

Robyn Marsack: Poets needs to try and subscribe to literature organisations such as SPL. Writers need to make an effort too – it’s a two-way system.

Graeme Hawley: Scottish Literature on Wikipedia needs updating. Far less info, photos, links available than Irish Literature – missed opportunity, can be updated by anyone!

Cathy Agnew: Highlighted DG Unlimited – new online membership organisation for those who care about Dumfries & Galloway’s creative sector and cultural life. Shared press & publicity.

In addition, Jenny Niven presented an update on work achieved or underway since publication of Creative Scotland’s Literature and Publishing Review in 2015, based on news release issued the morning of the Summit – Growing Scotland’s Literature & Publishing Sector

Key Action

A meeting will be convened, under the auspices of LAS, via an open call, that both members and interested non-members can attend to discuss and work out the detail of the Summit’s consensus for a joint service between organisations with a practical, pragmatic and focused universal approach.

Timescale: by end February 2017.

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November 30, 2016

Saltire Society Literary Awards 2016

LAS warmly congratulates all the winners of the Saltire Society Literary Awards announced last night (Thursday 24 November 2016) in a ceremony at Central Hall, Edinburgh.

Now recognised as Scotland’s foremost literary awards, the #SaltireLiterary Awards celebrate and support literary and academic excellence across six distinct categories with the winner of each of the individual book categories going forward to be considered for the Saltire Book of the Year Award.

The Book Award winners are:

Credit: saltiresociety.org.uk

Credit: saltiresociety.org.uk

The Publishing Award winners are:

2016 Saltire Society Publisher of the Year:
Floris Books

2016 Emerging Publisher of the Year Award:
Leah McDowell, Design and Production Manager at Floris Books

Congratulations to the shortlisted nominees too, listed here.

November 25, 2016

Creative Scotland news: Growing Scotland’s Literature and Publishing Sector

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Jenny Niven, Head of Literature, Languages and Publishing at Creative Scotland today, Wednesday 23 November 2016, provides an update on Creative Scotland’s work to support Scotland’s Literature and Publishing Sector, since the publication of its Literature and Publishing Review.

The update coincides with Niven’s appearance at Literature Alliance Scotland’s International Summit, taking place at Edinburgh’s Storytelling Centre, during Book Week Scotland.

Jenny Niven, Head of Literature, Languages and Publishing at Creative Scotland, commented:
“Convened in direct response to recommendations within the Literature and Publishing Sector Review published in June 2015, the Summit is bringing together – for the first time – writers, publishers, literature organisations and public bodies to plan how Scotland can better support the international promotion and presentation of Scotland’s writers and literature.

“A range of other projects, including new support for translation as well as investment in the recently established International Literature Showcase are part of our increased focus on international working, in response to feedback from the Literature sector in 2015’s sector review.

“That consultation has helped shape our Arts and Creative Industries Strategies and we thank everyone who has contributed to this work so far.  We look forward to continuing this work with Scottish Government, partner agencies and individuals to create the best conditions to support a thriving literature and publishing sector in Scotland and internationally.”

Published 18 months ago, the Literature Sector Review produced a broad spread of recommendations aimed at improving the health of literature in Scotland, sustaining the sector as a vibrant form of cultural expression, and as an important creative industry. The review covered a range of areas including individual writers, the publishing industry, developing readers, and the international promotion and development of Scottish writing.

In addition to the £4m awarded to writers, poets, book festivals, storytellers, publishers and literary organisations, over the last year, to support their work in Scotland and internationally, a number of measures have been undertaken in the past 18 months to help grow the Sector, including:

International Promotion
Developing a strategic approach to the international promotion of Scottish writers and Literature

  • Today’s International Summit has been co-ordinated by LAS, in direct response to a specific recommendation from Creative Scotland’s Literature and Publishing Sector Review, to explore a more strategic approach to the international promotion of Scottish writing and literature.  Dr. Alasdair Allan MSP, Scotland’s Minister for International Development and Europe, will open the event. The aim of the day is to lay the groundwork for a stronger international presence for Scottish literature.

Donald Smith, Vice-Chair of LAS said: The issue of Scotland’s international presence has been discussed a great deal over the years. This Summit marks the first time that the key players will be together in the same space with the same goal of agreeing what needs to be done and how we might work together to do it.”

  • Creative Scotland is partner funding a major new initiative with Writers Centre Norwichand the British Council to promote UK writers and literature organisations overseas.  Launched in September 2016, the online International Literature Showcase is supporting talented upcoming writers with promotional opportunities, new commissions and the development of their international profile.

Developing Talent and Skills

  • In the last financial year, 2015-16, Creative Scotland awarded more than £4million to writers, poets, book festivals, storytellers, publishers and literary organisations to support their work in Scotland and internationally. For further information on Creative Scotland’s support for Literature, languages and publishing please visit, here.
  • Creative Scotland’s Open Project Fundoffers support for individual writers at all stages of their careers.  Awards made this year include Janice Galloway, Kirsty Logan, Amy Liptrot, Ewan Morrison, Merryn Glover, Malachy Tallack and Gordon Meade.
  • The Gavin Wallace Fellowship enables writers to take time out of their usual environment to develop their practice over the course of a year.  Writer Kirsty Logan, who undertook her Fellowship in 2015, commented: “The past year has been absolute bliss. Having the freedom to read, think and explore is truly priceless for a writer. The fellowship came at exactly the right time in my writing life, and I can’t recommend it enough.”
  • Creative Scotland has partnered with the Scottish Review of Books to run the Emerging Critics Mentoring Programme, which was launched with a talk at the Edinburgh International Book Festival in August 2016. Between November 2016 and February, 2017, 20 writers looking to break into literary criticism are being mentored in small groups by critics Alan Taylor, Rosemary Goring, David Robinson, Kaite Welsh and Dave Coates. Mentees are receiving guidance on writing literary criticism for print and online platforms and are receiving individual feedback with a view to showcasing their work on a special Emerging Critics section of the Scottish Review of Books website.

Mentee Ian Abbott, commented: “The emerging critics programme is bringing together different voices and practices from inside and outside the field of literature to learn from, share with and challenge each other. It offers the opportunity to reset, refocus and deepen our thinking on what criticism is, could be and how relevant it is; I’m interested in who isn’t represented, the gaps that exist and why some voices are invisible. There is already a generosity and exchange amongst our group and I believe it’s going to produce a series of stimulating debates, new sets of knowledge and a hearty barrel of the unknown.”

Translation

  • Launched in August 2015, the new Translation Fund, delivered by Publishing Scotland, is designed to encourage international publishers to translate works by Scottish writers. The £25,000 fund has already supported the translation of work from authors such as Amy Liptrot, Gavin Francis, Jenni Fagan and Jackie Kay translated into a variety of languages including Spanish, Italian and German amongst others.

Aly Barr, Literature Officer at Creative Scotland, said “The Publishing Scotland translation fund is now attracting applications from leading publishers around the world. The fund forms part of a pathway for international publishers-working in parallel with the annual international publishing fellowship. The fund is the amongst the largest awards schemes for translating books in Britain and positions Scottish publishing as an outwardly facing industry keen to share its stories with the world.”

  • The Fellowship Programme launched in August 2015 with the aim of forging stronger and more strategic links between international and Scottish publishers and agents to discover and acquire the rights to Scottish books.  Developed in partnership between Creative Scotland, Emergents and Publishing Scotland, the programme has engagedeighteen international publishing fellows.
  • The newly established Translation Residency Programme is offering writers the opportunity to take the time to work on the translation of Scottish works.  Delivered by Cove Park in partnership withPublishing Scotland and the British Centre for Literary Translation.  Anne Brauner (Germany) and Clara Pezzuto (Italy) undertook residencies in September 2016 and translated works byScotland based authors – The Nowhere Emporium by Ross Mackenzie and And The Land Lay Still by James Robertson, respectively.
  • In 2017, the Translation Programme will expand to include partnerships with Writers Centre Norwich and University of Glasgow, in addition to a continuing relationship with Publishing Scotland, creating a UK-wide and outward looking programme. Highlights include residential mentoring for translators and poet-poet translation, as well as an increase in the number of translation residencies available.

Advocating for literature

  • Literature Alliance Scotland was awarded £50,000 in April 2016 to undertake a two-year programme of advocacy and networking involving its 26 member organisations (e.g. EIBF, Scottish Poetry Library, Scottish Book Trust, Saltire Society). The programme of activity will be rolled out over the next 18 months and the first output is today’s international summit.

Writer’s Pay

  • Creative Scotland’s recently published Arts Strategy underlines its ambition to improve the financial context in which artists and other creative professionals develop and make their work.  The Strategy has been informed by findings reported in the Literature Sector Review which found that that 81% of Scottish writers who responded to the survey earn below the National Minimum Wage. Together with the Society of Authors in Scotland, and other partners, Creative Scotland is exploring ways to address this issue and encourage organisations representing writers to continue to work closely with the sector in setting  standards  and  terms  of  engagements  for  activities  such as travel,  speaking  engagements, residencies, and publishing  contracts.

Access to literature and support for Scotland’s languages

  • In August 2015, Creative Scotland and the National Libraries of Scotland announced the first Scots Scriever – poet, novelist and playwright, Hamish MacDonald.  Responsible for working with the cultural sector, communities, and in particular, schools across Scotland, the Scriever will work to enhance awareness, understanding and use of Scots.  The Scriever post is also directly complementing Education Scotland’s work through their Scots language co-ordinators to broaden engagement of the Scots language policy.

Notes to Editors

About Creative Scotland 

Creative Scotland is the public body that supports the arts, screen and creative industries across all parts of Scotland on behalf of everyone who lives, works or visits here.  We enable people and organisations to work in and experience the arts, screen and creative industries in Scotland by helping others to develop great ideas and bring them to life.  We distribute funding provided by the Scottish Government and the National Lottery. For further information about Creative Scotland please visit www.creativescotland.com.  Follow us @creativescots and www.facebook.com/CreativeScotland

Media Contact

Sophie Bambrough
Media Relations and PR Officer, Creative Scotland

D +44 131 523 0015 +44 7916 137 632

E: Sophie.bambrough@CreativeScotland.com

November 23, 2016

Summit to Debate Promotion of Scotland’s Literature & Books Overseas

A Summit to debate how Scotland’s literature sector should promote its writing and writers overseas is set to take place on Wednesday 23 November 2016 at the Storytelling Centre in Edinburgh.

Taking place during Book Week Scotland, the Summit is hosted by Literature Alliance Scotland (LAS), Scotland’s largest network of literature and languages organisations.

Dr. Alasdair Allan MSP, Scotland’s Minister for International Development and Europe, will open the event that brings together – for the first time – writers, publishers, literature organisations and the main public agencies in Scotland with a responsibility for the international promotion of Scotland’s literature and languages.

Author and publisher James Robertson will deliver a keynote speech. Speakers also include non-fiction award-winning writer Dr. Gavin Francis, poet Kathleen Jamie and children’s author Vivian French, publishers Canongate and Birlinn, literature organisations Publishing Scotland, Edinburgh International Book Festival and Association of Scottish Literary Studies, and public bodies and agencies Creative Scotland, British Council and Scottish Development International. The full programme is here.

The ‘by invitation’ Summit responds to recommendation 31 of Creative Scotland’s Literature and Publishing Review, published in June 2015, to ‘lay the groundwork for a strategic and coordinated international presence.’

Minister for International Development and Europe, Dr Allan said: “The Scottish Government is committed to supporting Scotland’s literature internationally. This event will bring together for the first time public agencies, writers and literary organisations to discuss ways to strengthen the presence of Scotland’s literature and publishing on the international stage.

“I look forward to opening this event and being part of the discussions on how we can work together to promote our literary culture at every possible opportunity.”

Donald Smith, Vice-Chair of LAS said: “The issue of Scotland’s international presence has been discussed a great deal over the years. This Summit marks the first time that the key players will be together in the same space with the same goal of agreeing what needs to be done and how we might work together to do it.

“We’re honoured to welcome Dr Allan MSP to open the day and look forward to hearing from a range of different voices across the sector – both speakers and delegates. We don’t expect to find an answer in only one day, but we’re ambitious to reach a consensus of how we move forward practically, which is a step in the right direction.”

Jenny Niven, Head of Literature, Languages and Publishing at Creative Scotland, said: “Writing from Scotland, both historic and contemporary, is recognised worldwide for its excellence. However, a stronger, more visible and better coordinated international presence would bring benefit for Scottish writers, publisher and organisations alike, which in turn is of benefit to Scottish culture and society as a whole. This view was voiced across the sector during the consultation commissioned by Creative Scotland in 2015, so it’s terrific to see that work is being made tangible via the upcoming summit. There is a range of partners with a vested interest in working towards this goal and having everyone brought together is of enormous value. I look forward to a vibrant discussion, which foregrounds the strengths on which we can build, and lays the foundations for a practical approach in the future.”

-Ends-

Issued by JK Consultancy on behalf of Literature Alliance Scotland. For further information, please contact LAS Communications Officer Jenny Kumar on 07989 557198 / jenny@jkconsultancy.com

Notes to Editor

  • Published in July 2015, Creative Scotland’s Literature Sector Review provides an overview of contemporary literature provision, reflecting the successes and the distinct qualities of Literature and Publishing in Scotland whilst at the same time identifying development needs, future challenges and opportunities, which will help inform the future work to best support literature and publishing in Scotland.
  • The Review produced a broad spread of recommendations aimed at improving the health of literature in Scotland and sustaining the sector as a vibrant and resonant form of cultural expression, and as an important creative industry. It covers a range of areas including writers, the publishing industry, developing readers, the sector ecology and the international promotion and development of Scottish writing.
  • This event responds to a recommendation with the review that leading literature institutions and publishers convene a summit for laying the groundwork for a strategic and coordinated international presence. More info here:
  • http://www.creativescotland.com/resources/our-publications/sector-reviews/literature-and-publishing-sector-review

Literature Alliance Scotland, a membership organisation, represents the principal literature and languages organisations in Scotland, and is committed to advancing their interests at home and abroad. We exist to provide a strong, trusted collective voice on their behalf. Formed in Spring 2015, LAS is a successor to the Literature Forum for Scotland.

For further information visit www.literaturealliancescotland.co.uk or follow us @LitScotland

Book Week Scotland is a week-long celebration of books and reading that takes place every November. During Book Week, people of all ages and walks of life will come together in libraries, schools, community venues and workplaces to share and enjoy books and reading. They will be joined in this celebration by Scotland’s authors, poets, playwrights, storytellers and illustrators to bring a packed programme of events and projects to life.

Working with a range of partners, it is delivered by Scottish Book Trust, a national charity changing lives through reading and writing. Scottish Book Trust believes that books and reading have the power to change lives. As a national charity, we inspire and support the people of Scotland to read and write for pleasure. For more information about Book Week Scotland, visit www.bookweekscotland.com. Follow @Bookweekscot on Twitter, check out #bookweekscot or like the Book Week Scotland Facebook page.

Creative Scotland is the public body that supports the arts, screen and creative industries across all parts of Scotland on behalf of everyone who lives, works or visits here. We enable people and organisations to work in and experience the arts, screen and creative industries in Scotland by helping others to develop great ideas and bring them to life. We distribute funding provided by the Scottish Government and the National Lottery. For further information about Creative Scotland, please visit www.creativescotland.com Follow us @creativescots and www.facebook.com/CreativeScotland

November 15, 2016

End of LAS Chair’s term marked at first AGM

LAS held their first AGM yesterday (9 November 2016) at Saltire Society under their new constitution as a SCIO, which marked the end of Dr Ann Matheson’s term as LAS Chair.

The meeting was well attended by members and the board who made a special presentation to Ann for her dedication to Scotland’s literature and languages and her incredibly hard work and inimitable leadership in overseeing the transition of the organisation into Literature Alliance Scotland.

In addition, yesterday marked LAS Administrator Catherine Allan’s last board and members’ meeting as she is due to leave the organisation in December 2016. Catherine, who has worked tirelessly to keep the organisation running smoothly from its inception, also received a presentation to thank her for her important contribution.

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Dr Ann Matheson (left) and Catherine Allan

LAS is in the process of seeking a new Chair and more information will follow in due course.

Meanwhile, the role of administration will be handed over to Communications Officer Jenny Kumar from January 2017.

November 10, 2016