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Exhibition on libraries’ political & social status @ CCA Glasgow

Press release from CCA Glasgow:

The House that Heals the Soul brings social spaces, publishing resources and library collections from around the world to CCA Glasgow this summer (22 July – 3 September 2017).

This summer’s exhibition at CCA focuses on the political and social status of libraries.

Programmed in collaboration with artist Nick Thurston, CCA’s exhibition spaces will be opened up to house a selection of library and self-publishing resources alongside artworks that look at various histories of – and approaches towards – the protection and presentation of libraries’ collections, infrastructures and users.

The House that Heals the Soul includes artworks that explore the loss of libraries and books, and questions how controlling access to them can be a political strategy of occupation. Alongside typical and atypical library resources, the exhibition will also include a series of artworks examining readers’ relationships to publications, alternative politics of collecting publications, and technologies for disseminating and archiving them. Digital sharing platforms will also have a presence in the space, and there will be a series of talks by artists and practitioners throughout the show exploring our ever-changing relationships with public sites for knowledge development and exchange. The exhibition will support a dialogue around the importance of the librarian as an interlocutor, artist and curator, as well as giving access to CCA’s spaces for visitors to read, view and produce.

Artists and organisations

A wide range of artists and organisations will be part of The House that Heals the Soul including The Book Lovers, Beatrice Catanzaro, Curandi Katz, Sean Dockray & Benjamin Forster, Emily Jacir, My Bookcase, OOMK, Publication Studio Glasgow, The Serving Library, Temporary Services and Nick Thurston.

The Book Lovers is a collaboration between curator Joanna Zielińska and artist David Maroto focused on research into the artist’s novel employed as a medium in the visual arts. The Book Lovers’ entire collection of books will be on display in The House that Heals the Soul. Over 400 publications will be in the gallery – the largest collection in the exhibition – all artist’s novels. The books will be available for people to read within the gallery. The Book Lovers’ participation in The House that Heals the Soul is supported by the Mondriaan Fund.

Beatrice Catanzaro produces public art interventions with a special focus on social and political dynamics. In this exhibition, an installation representing the final outcome of A Needle in the Binding, her long-term research project with former Palestinian prisoners, will be on display. The project began with the prisoners’ book section of the Nablus Municipality Library which hosts approximately 8000 books read by Palestinian political prisoners between 1972 and 1995, alongside 870 hand-written notebooks; it considered access to books in prison and included the conservation of old and neglected books by the former prisoners and Catanzaro.

Curandi Katz (Valentina Curandi and Nathaniel Katz) are an artistic duo who have been working collaboratively since 2008. The Pacifist Library is an ongoing project of diverse interventions, centred on a mobile library articulated in different ways. All the books within the mobile library have a strong focus on ethical concerns and the connection between art and social change. The rucksack used for the nomadic, travelling library in Queens, New York will be on display during this exhibition, along with a selection of books from the project.

Benjamin Forster and Sean Dockray have been developing /dat library/ together, a peer-to-peer library of libraries that is built on top of the decentralised data-sharing tool called dat. Their work in The House that Heals the Soul is a desktop app which disseminates, shares and copies digital libraries. It allows users to add to, and create, their own libraries. It will be displayed on a computer in the gallery, alongside other computers in the space where visitors can access design software, links to artists projects and other online tools.

Emily Jacir is an artist and filmmaker who is primarily concerned with transformation, questions of translation, resistance and silenced historical narratives. Six photographs – extracts from a project called Untitled (fragment from ex libris) – will be on display during this exhibition. ex libris (2010-2012) commemorates the approximately thirty thousand books from Palestinian homes, libraries and institutions that were looted by Israeli authorities in 1948.

Founded in Glasgow in 2014 by artist Cristina Garriga, My Bookcase is a social enterprise that creatively explores the role of the book and its reader in today’s society. In 2017, Katie Reid and Julia Doz joined Garriga to expand My Bookcase across Glasgow, Barcelona and Amsterdam. My Bookcase will host a space in the gallery where books will be shared and exchanged in an informal way, and will present a workshop detailing how the space was produced. Following the exhibition, the exhcange space will be transferred to the bookshelves in the CCA foyer.

One of My Kind (OOMK) is a highly visual, handcrafted small-press printed zine; OOMK is run by Sofia Niazi, Rose Nordin and Heiba Lamara who also host regular creative events. OOMK welcomes contributions from women of diverse ethnic and spiritual backgrounds, and is especially keen to be inclusive of Muslim women. A bookshelf with their publications and zines will be in the gallery, and OOMK will also lead an all-day workshop on creating a publication or book on 1 September.

Publication Studio Glasgow is also an open source printing facility housed at CCA. During The House that Heals the Soul, it will move into the gallery spaces as an open-source resource for self-publishing. CCA and Publication Studio partners – My Bookcase, Good Press Gallery, A Feral Studio and Joanna Peace – will run a series of workshops and inductions, enabling any member of the public to design, print and bind their own book edition.

The Serving Library is an artist-run organisation founded in 2011 to develop a shared toolkit for artist-centred education and discourse through publishing and collecting. The Serving Library commission artworks that respond to text and language including framed prints, photographs, objects and ephemera. More than 100 objects are on display at The Serving Library’s building in Liverpool; a selection of these commissions will come to CCA this summer.

Temporary Services (Brett Bloom and Marc Fischer) started as an experimental exhibition space in Chicago, and now produces exhibitions, events, projects and publications. The Booklet Cloud – forty publications from Temporary Services and Half Letter Press, hung from above – will be installed at CCA. Also available will be booklets from the Self Reliance Library, which collates reference materials and information about books – exploring a multitude of ideas including skills sharing, technologies, design and ecology.

For the show, Nick Thurston will present Drag-Nets, an adjusted re-print of James Joyce’s Ulysses – a book effectively banned in the US in the 1920s. The installation includes a stack of free-to-take dust jackets for censored books, and a single copy of Ulysses with the title, author and dates matching the new Drag-Nets cover. The dust jackets can be taken and creased around any book that one wishes to secretly distribute. The book will be legally registered and any time the cover jacket is seen or the barcode scanned it will identify the volume it conceals as Drag-Nets by Arthur West.

Ainslie Roddick, CCA Curator said: “This exhibition brings together several important projects which look at how knowledge and histories have been shared across, and despite of, borders and regimes of censorship. Our temporary library of libraries will become space for exchange, where the ‘political’ potential of books and texts is explored in many facets.”

Public libraries have become one of the last remaining spaces where people can gather without expectation or requirement. As the future of libraries becomes increasingly precarious, The House that Heals the Soul aims to expand on the potential of libraries as sites of resistance, shelter, preservation, creation and restitution, and to do so in a dynamically public way as a functioning library of libraries.

Viviana Checchia, Public Engagement Curator at CCA said: “Galleries and libraries have something quite significant in common; they both represent a safe and welcoming platform where conversations can happen in a way no other public place can offer. That is one of the reasons we decided to transform our galleries into a social hub consisting of an open exhibition space, a library and a publication studio. We hope this will foster and encourage even greater engagement in our already vivid spaces.”

This project marks the beginning of a series of summer exhibitions in CCA’s main galleries that will open the rooms up as spaces for meeting and exchange, providing the resources and facilities for more activities to be led by our communities.

Francis McKee, CCA Director said: “We are very excited about our forthcoming show – The House that Heals the Soul – which will stretch our regular exhibition format. There will be a series of curated artworks but we are also setting aside space in the main gallery where artists and community groups who responded to an open call will present their own projects. This is an experiment to see if we can introduce a greater degree of autonomy into our exhibition format, testing the role of open source in that context as well as in our partner programme.”

Following an open call for proposals from individuals and groups to contribute library collections, host their own events or use the gallery as a space to meet during The House That Heals the Soul, a related programme of events has been created. Events will take place throughout the run of the exhibition.

The House that Heals the Soul

The Book Lovers, Beatrice Catanzaro, Curandi-Katz, Sean Dockray & Benjamin Forster, Emily Jacir, My Bookcase, OOMK, Publication Studio Glasgow, The Serving Library, Temporary Services & Nick Thurston

Saturday 22 July – Sunday 3 September 2017

Preview: Friday 21 July, 7pm-9pm

Tue-Sat: 11am-6pm // Sun: 12noon-6pm // Free

Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, G2 3JD

For full details, please see www.cca-glasgow.com

Events:

The Book Lovers, Not a Concept but a Story – talk

Sat 22 Jul, 1pm, CCA Galleries, Free on the door

Yon Afro, In Our Own Words – workshop

Sun 13 Aug, 6pm-8pm, Free but ticketed

OOMK workshop

Fri 1 Sep, 11am -3pm, Free but ticketed

Artists Self-Publishing Book Fair

Sat 2 Sep, From 11am, Free on the door

My Bookcase – Meeting Point workshop

Sat 2 Sep, 1pm-3.30pm, Free but ticketed

Ten Books workshop with Sarah Forrest and Amy Todman

Sat 2 Sep, 4.30pm-6pm, Free but ticketed

My Bookcase Small Talk – discussion event

Sun 3 Sep, 1pm-2.30pm, Free but ticketed

/Ends

For more information, images or interviews, please contact Julie Cathcart, Communications Manager, CCA – julie@cca-glasgow.com / 0141 352 4911.

Notes to Editors

About CCA: The Centre for Contemporary Arts, on Glasgow’s Sauchiehall Street, has been a hub for visual art, film, performance, festivals and literature since 1992 and celebrates its 25th anniversary this year. Previously home to The Third Eye Centre, the building is steeped in history and the organisation has played a key role in the cultural life of the city for decades. CCA’s year-round programme includes exhibitions, film, music, literature, spoken word, festivals, and talks. With building admissions of 335,650 in 2016-17, the venue hosted 253 programme partners across 1,075 events and 26 festivals. CCA also provides residencies for artists in the on-site Creative Lab space, as well as working internationally with residencies in Quebec, Palestine and the Caribbean. CCA curates six major exhibitions a year, presenting national and international contemporary artists, and is home to Intermedia Gallery which showcases emerging artists. CCA is supported by Creative Scotland, Glasgow Community Planning Partnership and Esmée Fairbairn Foundation. www.cca-glasgow.com

About The Book Lovers: Established in 2011, The Book Lovers is a collaboration between curator Joanna Zielińska and artist David Maroto. It is focused on research into the artists’ novel employed as a medium in the visual arts, exploring the different ways in which the artist’s novel is not a literary artefact but a medium employed by visual artists, exactly as they employ installation, video or performance. Its base is the creation of a collection of artists’ novels with a parallel online database, which is complemented by a series of exhibitions and public programmes, pop-up bookstores and publications. The Book Lovers work in partnership with a number of art institutions including M HKA, Museum of Contemporary Art in Antwerp; de Appel, Amsterdam; Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; EFA Project Space, NYC; Sternberg Press; Fabra i Coats – Centre d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona. Currently The Book Lovers are commissioning the creation of a new artist’s novel, called Tamam Shud, by Alex Cecchetti, produced by the Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art, Warsaw. The two-year long art project features five episodic performances and an exhibition intended to create a murder mystery narrative to be published in early 2018. www.thebooklovers.info

About Beatrice Catanzaro: Beatrice Catanzaro is an artist and researcher. Her projects create situations for shared learning and public participation and have been developed and hosted throughout Europe, the Middle East, and India. Between 2010 and 2015, Catanzaro lived in Palestine and initiated the women’s centre Bait al Karama (House of Dignity), an ongoing long-term community project (social enterprise) in Nablus. Her work has been exhibited in numerous international venues including MART of Rovereto (Italy) in the context of Manifesta 7, Espai d’Art Contemporani de Castelló (Spain), Jerusalem Show by Al-Ma’mal Foundation (Jerusalem), Land Art Biennial (Mongolia), CIC Cairo (Egypt), Quadriennale of Roma (Italy). Catanzaro taught practice-based research at the International Art Academy of Palestine in Ramallah from 2012 and 2015. Invited lectures and participation in seminars includes: the Creative Time Summit ‘Curriculum’ at the Venice Biennale; Campus in Camps educational program at the Dheisheh refugee camp in Bethlehem (Palestine); the University of Hyderabad and at the CEPT University for Architecture, Urban Planning and Interior Design, Ahmedabad (India). She is currently a doctoral candidate at the Oxford Brookes University in Social Sculpture.

About Curandi Katz: Valentina Curandi (Cattolica, RN, 1980) and Nathaniel Katz (Woodstock, CA, 1975) have been working collaboratively as Curandi Katz since 2008. Their work explores modes of delegation and imposition underlined by forms of negotiation and collaboration. It acts in the space in which interactions with different ecosystems form, operating between linguistic inscription and incorporation into the functions and internal dynamics of different bodies. The artists were awarded the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship (USA) and ICEBERG (IT). They have shown work at 16ma Quadriennale di Roma (IT), Yermilov Art Centre (UKR), Konstfak Stockholm (SWE), Motherlode Centrale Fies (IT), Passavamo sulla Storia Leggeri (IT), Rural in Action (IT), Bienal del Fin del Mundo (AR), ARTSTAYS (SLO), Hangart (IT), Kunstraum Munich (D), Galleria Artericambi (IT), ar/ge kunst (IT), MAC Lissone (IT), Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale (FL), VIAFARINI (IT), MOMA P.S.1 (NY), Flux Factory (NY), Center for Book Arts (NY), neon>campobase (IT), MEDRAR (EGY), Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Villa Croce (IT), Moscow Biennial for Young Art (RU).

About Sean Dockray & Benjamin Forster: Benjamin Forster and Sean Dockray live in Australia, 876km apart. They have rarely met in person, but they have worked on similar things in similar ways (e.g. a.library, AAAARG.ORG, Frontyard and the Frontyard Library, The Public School). Based on mutual trust rather than any formal notion of collaboration or collectivity, they have been developing /dat library/ together, a peer-to-peer library of libraries that is built on top of the decentralised data-sharing tool called “dat”. Like a library, dat is as much a community as it is a protocol; and as an open source project /dat library/ resists simple attributions of authorship, indebted as it is to this broader community.

About Emily Jacir: Emily Jacir is an artist and filmmaker who is primarily concerned with transformation, questions of translation, resistance and silenced historical narratives. Her work investigates personal and collective movement through public space and its implications on the physical and social experience of trans-Mediterranean space and time. She lives and works around the Mediterranean. Jacir is the recipient of several awards, including a Golden Lion at the 52nd Venice Biennale (2007); a Prince Claus Award (2007); the Hugo Boss Prize (2008); and the Herb Alpert Award (2011). Jacir’s works have been in important group exhibitions internationally, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA); Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin; dOCUMENTA (13) (2012);  Venice Biennale (2005, 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2013); 29th Bienal de São Paulo, Brazil (2010); 15th Biennale of Sydney (2006); Sharjah Biennial 7 (2005); Whitney Biennial (2004); and the 8th Istanbul Biennial (2003). Jacir’s recent solo exhibitions include Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2016); Whitechapel Gallery, London (2015); Darat il Funun, Amman (2014-2015); Beirut Art Center (2010); and Guggenheim Museum, New York (2009).

About My Bookcase: Founded in Glasgow in 2014, My Bookcase is a social enterprise that creatively explores the role of the book and its reader in today’s society. My Bookcase focuses on the book as a social tool for the exchange of knowledge – creatively deconstructing and exploring this object through art, architecture, design and literature, as well as with communities beyond these fields. The project’s starting point is an online platform, My Bookcase Platform, where readers open up their personal libraries to share their books in a free and participatory way. The initiative is supported by a network of meeting points – selected spaces in the city encouraging the sharing of books and encounters between readers. The aim of My Bookcase is to empower the reader by offering a creative space to unfold the knowledge gathered through private readings and bring individual knowledge into shared experience to support collective intelligence. My Bookcase was founded in 2014 by artist Cristina Garriga. In 2017, Katie Reid and Julia Doz joined Garriga to expand My Bookcase across the cities of Glasgow, Barcelona and Amsterdam. mybookcase.org

About OOMK: One of My Kind (OOMK) is a highly visual, handcrafted small-press publication. Printed biannually, its content pivots upon the imaginations, creativity and spirituality of women. Each issue centres around a different creative theme, with more general content exploring topics of faith, activism and identity. As well as producing a printed zine, OOMK is present online and hosts regular creative events including DIY Cultures. While OOMK welcomes contributions from women of diverse ethnic and spiritual backgrounds, it is especially keen to be inclusive of Muslim women. Studio OOMK is a design studio run by the editors of OOMK Zine, working with a host of clients, in particular galleries and museums, to host workshops, produce publications and undertake various projects. OOMK is run by Sofia Niazi, Rose Nordin and Heiba Lamara. oomk.net

About Publication Studio Glasgow: Publication Studio Glasgow is a collaboration with partners My Bookcase, Good Press Gallery, A Feral Studio and artist Joanna Peace. It is a publishing enterprise founded in 2009 in Portland, Oregon – an international network of sibling studios, with a presence in thirteen cities including New York, London, Rotterdam and now Glasgow. Publication Studio prints and binds books one at a time on-demand, creating original work with artists and writers. It is a laboratory for publication in its fullest sense – not just the production of books, but the production of a public. It is also an open source printing facility housed at CCA. Every few weeks, Publication Studio Glasgow runs inductions to teach people how to use the equipment, who can then book the space to make a small run of their own books. For more information and to book an induction email publicationstudioglasgow@gmail.com

About The Serving Library: The Serving Library is an artist-run non-profit organisation founded in 2011 to develop a shared toolkit for artist-centered education and discourse through related activities of publishing and collecting. It comprises a biannual journal (Bulletins of The Serving Library) published both online and in print, an archive of framed objects on permanent display, and a public programme of workshops and events. The Serving Library currently resides at Exhibition Research Lab, School of Art & Design at Liverpool John Moores University, where the gallery space serves as a satellite seminar room to host occasional classes for university-level art, design and writing students from schools across the world, as well as a regular series of public talks and exhibitions building upon the library’s archival material. servinglibrary.org

About Temporary Services: Temporary Services is Brett Bloom and Marc Fischer, and is based in Ft. Wayne (IN) and Chicago. Salem Collo-Julin worked with Temporary Services from 2001-2014. Temporary Services has existed, with several changes in membership and structure, since 1998, and produces exhibitions, events, projects and publications. Temporary Services started as an experimental exhibition space in a working class neighborhood of Chicago. The name directly reflects the desire to provide art as a service to others. It is a way for us to pay attention to the social context in which art is produced and received. Having “Temporary Services” displayed on the window helped to blend in with the cheap restaurants, dollar stores, currency exchanges and temporary employment agencies on the street. It was not immediately recognisable as an art space. This was partly to stave off the stereotypical role it might have played in the gentrification of the neighborhood. Experiencing art in the places we inhabit on a daily basis remains a critical concern. It helps to move art from a privileged experience to one more directly related to how we live our lives. A variety of people should decide how art is seen and interpreted, rather than continuing to strictly rely on those in power. Temporary Services collaborate amongst themselves and with others, even though this may destabilise how people understand the work. Temporaryservices.org

About Nick Thurston: Nick Thurston (b.1982, UK) is a writer and editor who makes artworks. He is the author or co-author of several books and editor of many more. Recent exhibitions include Reading as Art at Bury Museum & Sculpture Centre, 2016; Reading Matters at Printed Matter, New York, 2016 and Hate Library at Foksal Gallery, Warsaw, 2017. Since 2006, he has been co-editor of publishing collective Information As Material, with whom he was Writer in Residence at the Whitechapel Gallery, London, 2011-12. In 2014, he was Artist in Residence at the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin and in 2016 he was Visiting Research Fellow in Contemporary Writing at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. He teaches at the University of Leeds.

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June 28, 2017

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