A collective voice for literature and languages in Scotland

LAS support for Western Isles mobile library service

We wrote the following letter in February to show our support for the outstanding mobile service already being delivered to residents of the Western Isles and to urge the Comhairle nan Eileen Siar to invest in three new library vehicles to ensure continuity of this vital service. A decision is expected to be made at the Comhairle’s Policy & Resources Committee in May.

 

A letter in support of the mobile library service delivered by Comhairle nan Eilean Siar

My name is Peggy Hughes and I am the Chair of Literature Alliance Scotland (LAS), which represents the principal literature and languages organisations in Scotland.

I’m writing in support of the existing mobile library service and to urge Comhairle nan Eilean Siar to invest in the procurement of three new library vehicles to ensure the continuity of this vital service to the communities of the Western Isles.

While I do of course fully appreciate that the Comhairle is under financial pressure, the argument for long-term investment in public libraries – both static and mobile –  is strong.

The mobile library provides access to library and information services, including literature, culture and knowledge to all those who live too far away from a static library. With only four static libraries in the Outer Hebrides, the mobile vehicles cover huge areas and are vital in providing an adequate library service for all residents, as per the requirements of the Local Government Act.

The service supports reading for pleasure and their stock is vital in supporting literacies. Reading is Scotland’s favourite cultural activity, which brings with it important health benefits. In fact, a 2013 study conducted by the Scottish Government shows clear and significant links between cultural participation and improved health and wellbeing.

They also facilitate better quality of life through greater access to services, reducing service inequalities between towns and rural communities, and lower social isolation in all demographic groups, including vulnerable adults and the elderly.

Libraries provide equal opportunities for everyone, therefore renewing the current vehicles, which are no longer fit for purpose, is crucial to ensuring the Comhairle’s continued contribution to national outcomes such as reducing inequality and improving literacy, life chances and health.

Importantly, the mobile library service demonstrates the value the Comhairle places on its communities. And, despite the current state of the vehicles, local residents clearly value the service delivered with a consistent growth in membership nearly doubling in the past four years. Such impressive statistics speak volumes and would be the envy of other Councils across Scotland in putting forward a strong case for continued library investment.

Scotland has long been known for its strong support for public libraries, and for the excellent network of libraries that has already been created.

On behalf of our members, we call on the Comhairle to acknowledge the outstanding service already being delivered by your mobile library service staff.

We would urge you to protect it for the long-term by investing in new up-to-date vehicles to make sure that the people living in the Western Isles can continue to have regular access to a library service and the myriad benefits they offer both now and in the future.

Yours faithfully,

Peggy Hughes, Chair

 

Literature Alliance Scotland Membership at February 2018

MEMBERS

  • Association for Scottish Literary Studies (ASLS)
  • Association of Scottish Literary Agents (ASLA)
  • Bookdonors CIC
  • CILIPS (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in Scotland)
  • Edinburgh International Book Festival
  • Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature Trust
  • The Gaelic Books Council
  • Moniack Mhor
  • National Library of Scotland
  • Peter Pan Moat Brae Trust
  • Playwrights’ Studio Scotland
  • Publishing Scotland
  • The Saltire Society
  • Scottish Book Trust
  • Scottish Library and Information Council (SLIC)
  • SLAM (Scottish Literary and Arts Magazines)
  • Scottish Society of Playwrights
  • Scottish PEN
  • Scottish Poetry Library
  • Scottish Storytelling Forum
  • Scottish Writers Centre
  • Society of Authors in Scotland
  • Universities Committee for Scottish Literature
  • Wigtown Festival Company
  • Writers’ Guild of Great Britain (Scottish Region)

NETWORK ASSOCIATES

  • Ayton Publishing
  • Florida State Universities Library
  • Indie Authors World
  • Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh
  • Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication @ Stirling University
  • The Poetry Association of Scotland

 

 

April 3, 2018

Guest blog: Scottish children are reading what they want

Shelagh Toonen, Librarian at Elgin Academy, responds to an article in the national press that  ‘Scottish children are not reading challenging enough books’ (BBC News, 22 February 2018)

The report reads that we are failing our pupils in Scotland. It highlights a study which leads us to believe that we have a Scottish education system clearly heading for catastrophe. Librarians, teachers, parents, pupils, education authorities and concerned citizens have reason for alarm. There are signs of literacy failure nationwide.

However, in my own school, Elgin Academy, in 2016, 87% of our pupils left school with a literacy level of level 5 in literacy or better. This was compared with 80% of our virtual comparator.

This refutes the claim in the study that “many 16-year-olds sitting National 4 and 5 exams have the reading ability of a 13 year old or lower.”

However, the education company Renaissance Learning, Inc. has made the claim that Scottish children are not reading challenging enough books and this was reprinted in the Scottish media. Renaissance Learning’s flagship product is a software package called Accelerated Reader. The company claims that AR (as it is called) is “the world’s most widely used reading software.”

It has been established in the UK since 1999 and claims to have a presence in over 40,000 schools in more than 60 countries worldwide. Renaissance’s purpose is to accelerate reading and learning for all. A minimum subscription rate for 50 pupils is £450, or £9 per pupil. AR is, by its very nature, a system of providing extrinsic motivation and extrinsic rewards for reading. A very expensive system with very expensive rewards.

Most pupils, even those with less reading ability, quickly realise that one way to accumulate points is volume, volume, volume. Read easier books and lots of them so you can quickly take as many AR quizzes as possible with minimal challenge. This competitive race is likely to discourage weaker readers while proficient readers may find the joy and power of reading reduced to vocabulary words and computer-generated comprehension quizzes. Our young people should not be reading to achieve tangible rewards. They should read because they want to. AR gets motivation wrong. It assumes that the reason our young people don’t read is that they need to be bribed into doing so with extrinsic awards.

Bestselling YA author Judy Blume is unequivocal: “What I don’t like and what I really don’t like — intensely hate, you could say — is the Accelerated Reader program, even though many of my books are in that program, because they rate books, not on emotional content or emotional readiness. They’re rated by machine — how many words in a sentence, how long is a paragraph. Nothing to do with character, nothing to do with subject and again, nothing to do with emotional readiness.”

Our pupils in Scottish schools read because their school librarian selected and recommended a book they thought they would enjoy based on knowing them and on their interests. Our pupils read to escape, to heal, to experience, to have adventures, to escape into other worlds and to dream. We provide them with the means to do that. School librarians provide a reader-friendly, safe, nurturing space with time to read and be read to and with time to select and to talk about reading. We provide access to books and, more importantly, choice. Young people are given free rein in the library, to read anything and everything they want.

Free choice is a powerful motivator in reading. For a young person, to have the opportunity to independently choose their own book, surely demonstrates their willingness and desire to read? It does not matter what that choice is. It should not be frowned upon nor the reader discouraged. Choice empowers our young people and if we value their choices, then we value them. Their choice leads to discussion, firstly about the books, but also then helps to create and to strengthen relationships. Ultimately, choice develops independent readers and learners.

If secondary school pupils do choose the same books they enjoyed in primary school, or choose to remain with one series of books, then they are reading books they have known, enjoyed and loved. If these books provide a comforting or nurturing value during what might be challenging or difficult times at secondary school, then that is a good thing. If pupils want to remain with Robert Muchamore, or Jeff Kinney or Anthony Horowitz and want to re-read the whole series, then let them.

School librarians are there to help our pupils to make choices based on their interests and to develop their enthusiasm for books. We are there to motivate and to enable our pupils to have choice in their reading. Strong and capable readers are those who read widely and diversely in a wide variety of genres and in the quest to build capable readers, promoting independent, self-selected reading remains key. Creating keen, lifelong readers doesn’t just happen. It takes a school library, with a diverse, relevant and vibrant collection of books and a professionally qualified librarian to help reach that goal.

My own proposal would be that all pupils be given the gifts of time and books they want to read throughout their school lives and that all young children would have an adult who would read aloud to them each and every day.

Parents of our pupils have a role to play in developing their reading habit and their literacy skills too. What parents do is more important than who parents are. A study involving 4000 children in the UK found parents who provided learning support at home had a positive impact on their child’s cognitive, language and socio-emotional development, regardless of the parent’s class or educational background. This can be anything from reading to their child, library visits, singing songs, reading poems or nursery rhymes.

The powerful influence of the early home learning environment was apparent in the pre-school period, and when children started school, and continued right through to the end of secondary school. Closing the gap in educational attainment between children from affluent and disadvantaged homes is a current priority of the Scottish Government.

A quality school library can contribute to reducing the attainment gap and enable vulnerable students to improve academic success. Evidence reveals the difference a school library can make at both primary level and to disadvantaged pupils who have limited access to reading resources in the home.

Nurturing my school’s reading culture gives me the opportunity to raise the profile of books and reading in school, while at the same time sharing my passion for high-interest titles, favourite authors and the joy of books.

I believe that, through independent reading and freedom of choice, our young people gain a wealth of background knowledge about many different things and they will build vocabulary, fluency and will want to read more. I want our pupils to enjoy reading and I know that school librarians’ role in creating readers is one of the most exciting and satisfying parts of our job.

Now, with changing technologies and concepts, the school library is a much more exciting place to explore than ever before. We all relish the excitement on a pupil’s face, when they come into the library, knowing that they are entering a world of creativity, adventure, learning, fun and warmth. It is a reminder every day of why our school libraries and reading are so important to our young people.

Professional library support and choice really do help to make our make young people into readers. I firmly believe that our libraries should be the beating heart of the reading culture in our schools in Scotland.

“Students will read if we give them the books, the time, and the enthusiastic encouragement to do so. If we make them wait for the one unit a year in which they are allowed to choose their own books and become readers, they may never read at all. To keep our students reading, we have to let them.”
― Donalyn Miller The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child.

This guest blog originally appeared on the CILIPS’ website. It is reproduced here with kind permission. 

March 1, 2018

ICYMI: Watch the #ThisIsIt2017 videos

If you didn’t make it to the Literary Cabaret 2017 on 23 November, or to watch the speakers again, here are the videos.

Please share your comments with us @LitScotland using #ThisIsIt2017.

Fiona Hyslop MSP, Scotland’s Culture Secretary opens the show.

“Words matter, writers matter…Scotland is a country of the word. You are guardians and nurturers of that word. You are creators of that word. Thank you.”

 

Francis Bickmore, Publishing Director of Canongate, on publishing:

“Novels are literally a crash-course in empathy…Books can not only make us care but they can also give us hope.”

 

Adrian Turpin, Artistic Director of Wigtown Book Festival on book festivals:

 

Pamela Tulloch, CEO of Scottish Library and Information Council on public and school libraries:

 

Award-winning poet William Letford on writers:

 

Best-selling author Louise Welsh on international perspective:

December 4, 2017

This is it! Scotland’s literary talent in the spotlight at cabaret event

Author Louise Welsh, poet William Letford (l) and Francis Bickmore of Canongate Books.

Best-selling author Louise Welsh and award-winning poet William Letford are set to headline an inaugural literary cabaret taking place this month, which shines a light on the nation’s literary scene in 2017.

The fast-paced, 90-minute show – called This Is It! –  will highlight the year’s literary happenings across five strands – publishing, book festivals, school and public libraries, writers, and the international perspective.

Fiona Hyslop MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Culture, Tourism and External Affairs will open this first public event from Literature Alliance Scotland (LAS) – the nation’s largest network of literature and languages organisations – on Wednesday 23 November from 7pm at Central Hall, Edinburgh.

Speakers include, respectively, Canongate Books’ Publishing Director Francis Bickmore, Adrian Turpin, Artistic Director of Wigtown Book Festival, and Pamela Tulloch, Chief Executive of Scottish Libraries Information Council (SLIC).

Poet William Letford, who hails from Stirling, will cover writer development and perform a reading of his poem This Is It from which the event takes its name.

Closing the show will be Glasgow-based author, Louise Welsh, who will speak about Scotland’s books and literature on the international stage as well as the importance of literary exchange between nations.

In addition, attendees will be able to browse and buy books from Scotland’s writers and publishers courtesy of Blackwell’s Bookshop, Edinburgh while librarians from South Lanarkshire’s digital library programme ‘ACTIVEe’ will be on hand to demonstrate 3D printers which are now available in all of Scotland’s public libraries.

Peggy Hughes, Chair of LAS said:

“With over 40 book festivals a year, ambitious new publishing houses such as 404ink emerging, stalwarts such as Birlinn celebrating 25 years, another Man Booker shortlisting for Ali Smith, Muriel Spark’s centenary on the horizon, not to mention the many, many Scottish books and authors that are going into the world every day and taking our stories and voices with them, it seemed high time that we take a moment to celebrate the wealth of our literature sector and shout about its cultural and social value.”

“At a time when Scotland’s Culture Strategy is being developed, it’s vital that we champion our sector and all the talented people working within and for it. Our literary cabaret is a chance for everyone with an interest in Scotland’s literature and book community to gather together and say, ‘This is it, this is a snapshot of what’s been happening this year’. It’s about carving out a space to celebrate the wonderful success, highlight the exciting potential and address the challenges. That’s why we’re so delighted that Fiona Hyslop is officially opening the event and giving this rich and vibrant sector the recognition it deserves.”

Culture Secretary Fiona Hyslop said:

“Scotland’s distinguished literary culture is a notable part of our national identity. It also attracts visitors to Scotland and raises our cultural profile around the world.

“I am pleased that the Literature Alliance Scotland is extending its reach beyond its membership of key individuals and agencies which promote writers and publishers to engage with the public.

“We are doing all we can to support the literary sector to ensure this rich legacy is maintained and strengthened in future years. We do this through for example our support for Creative Scotland, literacy, libraries, festivals, Book Week Scotland, the First Minister’s Reading Challenge and the post of Makar.”

Jenny Niven, Head of Literature, Languages & Publishing, Creative Scotland, said:

“We have a unique, distinctive and rich cultural asset in literature that not only makes an enormous impact to people’s lives in Scotland but also enhances our reputation internationally.  From poets to storytellers, screenwriters and playwrights the quantity and quality of writing being published here is truly inspiring. This is It! and Literature Alliance Scotland creates an important opportunity to bring together authors, publishers, libraries, festivals and literary organisations, and champion the work being done to make literature more visible to a greater number of people. We look forward to continuing this work with Scottish Government, partner agencies and individuals to create the best conditions to support a thriving literature and publishing sector in Scotland and internationally.”

This Is It! is hosted by Siân Bevan and tickets are £7 /£6 – https://this-is-it-literary-cabaret-2017.eventbrite.com/

-Ends-

Issued by JK Consultancy on behalf of Literature Alliance Scotland. For further information, please contact LAS Communications Officer Jenny Kumar on 07989 557198 / jenny@jkconsultancy.com

Notes to Editor

Literature Alliance Scotland, a membership organisation, represents the principal literature and languages organisations in Scotland, and is committed to advancing their interests at home and abroad. We exist to provide a strong, trusted collective voice on their behalf. Formed in Spring 2015, LAS is a successor to the Literature Forum for Scotland. For further information visit www.literaturealliancescotland.co.uk or follow us on Twitter: @LitScotland

Creative Scotland is the public body that supports the arts, screen and creative industries across all parts of Scotland on behalf of everyone who lives, works or visits here. We enable people and organisations to work in and experience the arts, screen and creative industries in Scotland by helping others to develop great ideas and bring them to life. We distribute funding provided by the Scottish Government and the National Lottery. For further information about Creative Scotland, please visit www.creativescotland.com Follow us @creativescots and www.facebook.com/CreativeScotland

November 6, 2017
This is it! Scotland’s literary talent in the spotlight at cabaret event

Scottish Libraries receive Carnegie UK Trust Funding

Public libraries across the UK, including 2 in Scotland, are to receive new funding to help their communities explore major health and wellbeing issues including stress, obesity, body image and even death in new ways.

The ‘Engaging Libraries’ funding, announced by the Carnegie UK Trust and global charitable foundation Wellcome, will support libraries to engage local people in imaginative and interactive projects exploring health and wellbeing.

Libraries in East Dunbartonshire will engage with young and older people to explore brain development at different stages in life, and use the celebration the Year of Young People to work with young people and make intergenerational links via a project called Brainworks.

Dundee libraries’ project Talking ‘Bout Teddies will work with Dr Zeedyk to highlight the importance of teddies to children’s wellbeing, by recording and screening stories and short films of children and adults talking about their teddies and hosting a public lecture on attachment as part of the Dundee Science Festival.

Information courtesy of CILIP in Scotland.

October 31, 2017

Notes on Visions of the Future: Libraries @ Edinburgh International Book Festival

Sunday 27 August 2017, 7.30-9pm, Edinburgh International Book Festival.

Featuring: Julia Donaldson, Pete White, Dr Jenny Peachey, chair: David Chipakupaku

Format: short presentation by each guest, followed by group discussion, then audience questions.

Julia Donaldson, children’s author and Children’s Laureate 2011-2013

Read out two examples of letters from parents who use the libraries in different ways, including the difficulties in accessing ‘hubs’ – rather than smaller local libraries – for some parents. She had heard comments that some librarians didn’t dare speak out: “librarians are not allowed to say, ‘our libraries are doing well'”. Emphasised that although understandable some cuts need to be made in times of financial difficulty, it would be disastrous if buildings were sold and we couldn’t get them back.

Jenny Peachey, Senior Policy and Development Officer, Carnegie UK Trust

Shared stats from Carnegie Trust report ‘Shining a Light: The future of public libraries across the UK and Ireland.’ Showed that although library membership is doing well, frequency of use is down (from 2011-2016), and that there’s a value action gap (i.e.libraries are seen as crucial but are not necessarily being used). Issue of two very different user groups, who need two different messages. There’s an appetite for change amongst the public, including increased council services available in libraries, more events and more cafes). Increased range of books was not seen as a priority for many people. Potential improvements: digital offer, a more tailored offer, which recognises that it’s not a universal/broad service? Also: Create a workplace culture of innovation which empowers library staff and share learning across the jurisdictions, which all have different strengths and weaknesses.

Pete White, Chief Executive of Positive Prison

Pete talked about his experience in the prison system, including being allocated to work in the library during his sentence. Shared key stats including: 80% of prisoners are from the top 5% more impoverished areas. Two thirds of prisoners have a reading age of less than 11, two thirds have mental health issues and two thirds have issues with addiction. Each year 250,000 people have a court report written about them. The prison population remains about steady with approx 19,000 in and out each year. He explained how libraries are the “opportunity to take something forward”, emphasising that they are linked to communication as a whole. The average middle-class household will use around 32,000 words per day, whereas a family with two children and one parent with an addiction is likely to use around 600. “That’s a lot of missing words by the time they grow up”. He ended with “libraries are vital, simple as.”

Further discussion points and key quotations

– importance of recognising that it’s not patronising to teach reading or stories to adults

– discussion of important of libraries to people once released from prison – JP pointed out we could connect the dots.

– JP: Explained that something is being lost in communication, for example many people surveyed said they wanted to be able to reserve books online, which they already can. Also: think about the ‘why’ of libraries when spreading the message, and recognise it’s not a universal message.

– PW: Libraries could “step sideways from tradition” and become more fearless, with more involvement from young people. Can be intimidating to some people.

– JD: Libraries as a physical place v. important – vital role as a community centre.

– JP: “Libraries are the last free, safe, civic space we have.”

– Discussion of the social return on investment, e.g. training volunteers, which means they’re seen as people with the ability to contribute. Importance of quantifying long-term value and preventative spend, e.g. libraries save the NHS millions each year.

– Questions raised about who do we expect to invest in libraries? (US model of philanthropy mentioned). How can they generate money? How to change the social mindset about libraries?

Describe your dream library!

DC: Birmingham! But with all local services still intact.

JD: I love the variety, and how each one is so different.

JP: A library which is immediately welcoming and full of people

PW: Wee free libraries, available to all.

Points from audience discussion

  • Pamela Tulloch (CEO of Scottish Library and Information Council) pointed out that the situation in Scotland is not as dire as often portrayed: new libraries are opening around the country, and it’s important to celebrate the positives.
  • importance of communicating with your local library about what you want
  • use your library, and encourage others, to help the stats.
  • celebrate the diversity of library users, without judgment
  • make sure communicate the contemporary offer to those who don’t value their libraries.

Notes courtesy of Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature Trust.

 

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September 6, 2017

Exhibition on libraries’ political & social status @ CCA Glasgow

Press release from CCA Glasgow:

The House that Heals the Soul brings social spaces, publishing resources and library collections from around the world to CCA Glasgow this summer (22 July – 3 September 2017).

This summer’s exhibition at CCA focuses on the political and social status of libraries.

Programmed in collaboration with artist Nick Thurston, CCA’s exhibition spaces will be opened up to house a selection of library and self-publishing resources alongside artworks that look at various histories of – and approaches towards – the protection and presentation of libraries’ collections, infrastructures and users.

The House that Heals the Soul includes artworks that explore the loss of libraries and books, and questions how controlling access to them can be a political strategy of occupation. Alongside typical and atypical library resources, the exhibition will also include a series of artworks examining readers’ relationships to publications, alternative politics of collecting publications, and technologies for disseminating and archiving them. Digital sharing platforms will also have a presence in the space, and there will be a series of talks by artists and practitioners throughout the show exploring our ever-changing relationships with public sites for knowledge development and exchange. The exhibition will support a dialogue around the importance of the librarian as an interlocutor, artist and curator, as well as giving access to CCA’s spaces for visitors to read, view and produce.

Artists and organisations

A wide range of artists and organisations will be part of The House that Heals the Soul including The Book Lovers, Beatrice Catanzaro, Curandi Katz, Sean Dockray & Benjamin Forster, Emily Jacir, My Bookcase, OOMK, Publication Studio Glasgow, The Serving Library, Temporary Services and Nick Thurston.

The Book Lovers is a collaboration between curator Joanna Zielińska and artist David Maroto focused on research into the artist’s novel employed as a medium in the visual arts. The Book Lovers’ entire collection of books will be on display in The House that Heals the Soul. Over 400 publications will be in the gallery – the largest collection in the exhibition – all artist’s novels. The books will be available for people to read within the gallery. The Book Lovers’ participation in The House that Heals the Soul is supported by the Mondriaan Fund.

Beatrice Catanzaro produces public art interventions with a special focus on social and political dynamics. In this exhibition, an installation representing the final outcome of A Needle in the Binding, her long-term research project with former Palestinian prisoners, will be on display. The project began with the prisoners’ book section of the Nablus Municipality Library which hosts approximately 8000 books read by Palestinian political prisoners between 1972 and 1995, alongside 870 hand-written notebooks; it considered access to books in prison and included the conservation of old and neglected books by the former prisoners and Catanzaro.

Curandi Katz (Valentina Curandi and Nathaniel Katz) are an artistic duo who have been working collaboratively since 2008. The Pacifist Library is an ongoing project of diverse interventions, centred on a mobile library articulated in different ways. All the books within the mobile library have a strong focus on ethical concerns and the connection between art and social change. The rucksack used for the nomadic, travelling library in Queens, New York will be on display during this exhibition, along with a selection of books from the project.

Benjamin Forster and Sean Dockray have been developing /dat library/ together, a peer-to-peer library of libraries that is built on top of the decentralised data-sharing tool called dat. Their work in The House that Heals the Soul is a desktop app which disseminates, shares and copies digital libraries. It allows users to add to, and create, their own libraries. It will be displayed on a computer in the gallery, alongside other computers in the space where visitors can access design software, links to artists projects and other online tools.

Emily Jacir is an artist and filmmaker who is primarily concerned with transformation, questions of translation, resistance and silenced historical narratives. Six photographs – extracts from a project called Untitled (fragment from ex libris) – will be on display during this exhibition. ex libris (2010-2012) commemorates the approximately thirty thousand books from Palestinian homes, libraries and institutions that were looted by Israeli authorities in 1948.

Founded in Glasgow in 2014 by artist Cristina Garriga, My Bookcase is a social enterprise that creatively explores the role of the book and its reader in today’s society. In 2017, Katie Reid and Julia Doz joined Garriga to expand My Bookcase across Glasgow, Barcelona and Amsterdam. My Bookcase will host a space in the gallery where books will be shared and exchanged in an informal way, and will present a workshop detailing how the space was produced. Following the exhibition, the exhcange space will be transferred to the bookshelves in the CCA foyer.

One of My Kind (OOMK) is a highly visual, handcrafted small-press printed zine; OOMK is run by Sofia Niazi, Rose Nordin and Heiba Lamara who also host regular creative events. OOMK welcomes contributions from women of diverse ethnic and spiritual backgrounds, and is especially keen to be inclusive of Muslim women. A bookshelf with their publications and zines will be in the gallery, and OOMK will also lead an all-day workshop on creating a publication or book on 1 September.

Publication Studio Glasgow is also an open source printing facility housed at CCA. During The House that Heals the Soul, it will move into the gallery spaces as an open-source resource for self-publishing. CCA and Publication Studio partners – My Bookcase, Good Press Gallery, A Feral Studio and Joanna Peace – will run a series of workshops and inductions, enabling any member of the public to design, print and bind their own book edition.

The Serving Library is an artist-run organisation founded in 2011 to develop a shared toolkit for artist-centred education and discourse through publishing and collecting. The Serving Library commission artworks that respond to text and language including framed prints, photographs, objects and ephemera. More than 100 objects are on display at The Serving Library’s building in Liverpool; a selection of these commissions will come to CCA this summer.

Temporary Services (Brett Bloom and Marc Fischer) started as an experimental exhibition space in Chicago, and now produces exhibitions, events, projects and publications. The Booklet Cloud – forty publications from Temporary Services and Half Letter Press, hung from above – will be installed at CCA. Also available will be booklets from the Self Reliance Library, which collates reference materials and information about books – exploring a multitude of ideas including skills sharing, technologies, design and ecology.

For the show, Nick Thurston will present Drag-Nets, an adjusted re-print of James Joyce’s Ulysses – a book effectively banned in the US in the 1920s. The installation includes a stack of free-to-take dust jackets for censored books, and a single copy of Ulysses with the title, author and dates matching the new Drag-Nets cover. The dust jackets can be taken and creased around any book that one wishes to secretly distribute. The book will be legally registered and any time the cover jacket is seen or the barcode scanned it will identify the volume it conceals as Drag-Nets by Arthur West.

Ainslie Roddick, CCA Curator said: “This exhibition brings together several important projects which look at how knowledge and histories have been shared across, and despite of, borders and regimes of censorship. Our temporary library of libraries will become space for exchange, where the ‘political’ potential of books and texts is explored in many facets.”

Public libraries have become one of the last remaining spaces where people can gather without expectation or requirement. As the future of libraries becomes increasingly precarious, The House that Heals the Soul aims to expand on the potential of libraries as sites of resistance, shelter, preservation, creation and restitution, and to do so in a dynamically public way as a functioning library of libraries.

Viviana Checchia, Public Engagement Curator at CCA said: “Galleries and libraries have something quite significant in common; they both represent a safe and welcoming platform where conversations can happen in a way no other public place can offer. That is one of the reasons we decided to transform our galleries into a social hub consisting of an open exhibition space, a library and a publication studio. We hope this will foster and encourage even greater engagement in our already vivid spaces.”

This project marks the beginning of a series of summer exhibitions in CCA’s main galleries that will open the rooms up as spaces for meeting and exchange, providing the resources and facilities for more activities to be led by our communities.

Francis McKee, CCA Director said: “We are very excited about our forthcoming show – The House that Heals the Soul – which will stretch our regular exhibition format. There will be a series of curated artworks but we are also setting aside space in the main gallery where artists and community groups who responded to an open call will present their own projects. This is an experiment to see if we can introduce a greater degree of autonomy into our exhibition format, testing the role of open source in that context as well as in our partner programme.”

Following an open call for proposals from individuals and groups to contribute library collections, host their own events or use the gallery as a space to meet during The House That Heals the Soul, a related programme of events has been created. Events will take place throughout the run of the exhibition.

The House that Heals the Soul

The Book Lovers, Beatrice Catanzaro, Curandi-Katz, Sean Dockray & Benjamin Forster, Emily Jacir, My Bookcase, OOMK, Publication Studio Glasgow, The Serving Library, Temporary Services & Nick Thurston

Saturday 22 July – Sunday 3 September 2017

Preview: Friday 21 July, 7pm-9pm

Tue-Sat: 11am-6pm // Sun: 12noon-6pm // Free

Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, G2 3JD

For full details, please see www.cca-glasgow.com

Events:

The Book Lovers, Not a Concept but a Story – talk

Sat 22 Jul, 1pm, CCA Galleries, Free on the door

Yon Afro, In Our Own Words – workshop

Sun 13 Aug, 6pm-8pm, Free but ticketed

OOMK workshop

Fri 1 Sep, 11am -3pm, Free but ticketed

Artists Self-Publishing Book Fair

Sat 2 Sep, From 11am, Free on the door

My Bookcase – Meeting Point workshop

Sat 2 Sep, 1pm-3.30pm, Free but ticketed

Ten Books workshop with Sarah Forrest and Amy Todman

Sat 2 Sep, 4.30pm-6pm, Free but ticketed

My Bookcase Small Talk – discussion event

Sun 3 Sep, 1pm-2.30pm, Free but ticketed

/Ends

For more information, images or interviews, please contact Julie Cathcart, Communications Manager, CCA – julie@cca-glasgow.com / 0141 352 4911.

Notes to Editors

About CCA: The Centre for Contemporary Arts, on Glasgow’s Sauchiehall Street, has been a hub for visual art, film, performance, festivals and literature since 1992 and celebrates its 25th anniversary this year. Previously home to The Third Eye Centre, the building is steeped in history and the organisation has played a key role in the cultural life of the city for decades. CCA’s year-round programme includes exhibitions, film, music, literature, spoken word, festivals, and talks. With building admissions of 335,650 in 2016-17, the venue hosted 253 programme partners across 1,075 events and 26 festivals. CCA also provides residencies for artists in the on-site Creative Lab space, as well as working internationally with residencies in Quebec, Palestine and the Caribbean. CCA curates six major exhibitions a year, presenting national and international contemporary artists, and is home to Intermedia Gallery which showcases emerging artists. CCA is supported by Creative Scotland, Glasgow Community Planning Partnership and Esmée Fairbairn Foundation. www.cca-glasgow.com

About The Book Lovers: Established in 2011, The Book Lovers is a collaboration between curator Joanna Zielińska and artist David Maroto. It is focused on research into the artists’ novel employed as a medium in the visual arts, exploring the different ways in which the artist’s novel is not a literary artefact but a medium employed by visual artists, exactly as they employ installation, video or performance. Its base is the creation of a collection of artists’ novels with a parallel online database, which is complemented by a series of exhibitions and public programmes, pop-up bookstores and publications. The Book Lovers work in partnership with a number of art institutions including M HKA, Museum of Contemporary Art in Antwerp; de Appel, Amsterdam; Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; EFA Project Space, NYC; Sternberg Press; Fabra i Coats – Centre d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona. Currently The Book Lovers are commissioning the creation of a new artist’s novel, called Tamam Shud, by Alex Cecchetti, produced by the Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art, Warsaw. The two-year long art project features five episodic performances and an exhibition intended to create a murder mystery narrative to be published in early 2018. www.thebooklovers.info

About Beatrice Catanzaro: Beatrice Catanzaro is an artist and researcher. Her projects create situations for shared learning and public participation and have been developed and hosted throughout Europe, the Middle East, and India. Between 2010 and 2015, Catanzaro lived in Palestine and initiated the women’s centre Bait al Karama (House of Dignity), an ongoing long-term community project (social enterprise) in Nablus. Her work has been exhibited in numerous international venues including MART of Rovereto (Italy) in the context of Manifesta 7, Espai d’Art Contemporani de Castelló (Spain), Jerusalem Show by Al-Ma’mal Foundation (Jerusalem), Land Art Biennial (Mongolia), CIC Cairo (Egypt), Quadriennale of Roma (Italy). Catanzaro taught practice-based research at the International Art Academy of Palestine in Ramallah from 2012 and 2015. Invited lectures and participation in seminars includes: the Creative Time Summit ‘Curriculum’ at the Venice Biennale; Campus in Camps educational program at the Dheisheh refugee camp in Bethlehem (Palestine); the University of Hyderabad and at the CEPT University for Architecture, Urban Planning and Interior Design, Ahmedabad (India). She is currently a doctoral candidate at the Oxford Brookes University in Social Sculpture.

About Curandi Katz: Valentina Curandi (Cattolica, RN, 1980) and Nathaniel Katz (Woodstock, CA, 1975) have been working collaboratively as Curandi Katz since 2008. Their work explores modes of delegation and imposition underlined by forms of negotiation and collaboration. It acts in the space in which interactions with different ecosystems form, operating between linguistic inscription and incorporation into the functions and internal dynamics of different bodies. The artists were awarded the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship (USA) and ICEBERG (IT). They have shown work at 16ma Quadriennale di Roma (IT), Yermilov Art Centre (UKR), Konstfak Stockholm (SWE), Motherlode Centrale Fies (IT), Passavamo sulla Storia Leggeri (IT), Rural in Action (IT), Bienal del Fin del Mundo (AR), ARTSTAYS (SLO), Hangart (IT), Kunstraum Munich (D), Galleria Artericambi (IT), ar/ge kunst (IT), MAC Lissone (IT), Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale (FL), VIAFARINI (IT), MOMA P.S.1 (NY), Flux Factory (NY), Center for Book Arts (NY), neon>campobase (IT), MEDRAR (EGY), Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Villa Croce (IT), Moscow Biennial for Young Art (RU).

About Sean Dockray & Benjamin Forster: Benjamin Forster and Sean Dockray live in Australia, 876km apart. They have rarely met in person, but they have worked on similar things in similar ways (e.g. a.library, AAAARG.ORG, Frontyard and the Frontyard Library, The Public School). Based on mutual trust rather than any formal notion of collaboration or collectivity, they have been developing /dat library/ together, a peer-to-peer library of libraries that is built on top of the decentralised data-sharing tool called “dat”. Like a library, dat is as much a community as it is a protocol; and as an open source project /dat library/ resists simple attributions of authorship, indebted as it is to this broader community.

About Emily Jacir: Emily Jacir is an artist and filmmaker who is primarily concerned with transformation, questions of translation, resistance and silenced historical narratives. Her work investigates personal and collective movement through public space and its implications on the physical and social experience of trans-Mediterranean space and time. She lives and works around the Mediterranean. Jacir is the recipient of several awards, including a Golden Lion at the 52nd Venice Biennale (2007); a Prince Claus Award (2007); the Hugo Boss Prize (2008); and the Herb Alpert Award (2011). Jacir’s works have been in important group exhibitions internationally, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA); Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin; dOCUMENTA (13) (2012);  Venice Biennale (2005, 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2013); 29th Bienal de São Paulo, Brazil (2010); 15th Biennale of Sydney (2006); Sharjah Biennial 7 (2005); Whitney Biennial (2004); and the 8th Istanbul Biennial (2003). Jacir’s recent solo exhibitions include Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2016); Whitechapel Gallery, London (2015); Darat il Funun, Amman (2014-2015); Beirut Art Center (2010); and Guggenheim Museum, New York (2009).

About My Bookcase: Founded in Glasgow in 2014, My Bookcase is a social enterprise that creatively explores the role of the book and its reader in today’s society. My Bookcase focuses on the book as a social tool for the exchange of knowledge – creatively deconstructing and exploring this object through art, architecture, design and literature, as well as with communities beyond these fields. The project’s starting point is an online platform, My Bookcase Platform, where readers open up their personal libraries to share their books in a free and participatory way. The initiative is supported by a network of meeting points – selected spaces in the city encouraging the sharing of books and encounters between readers. The aim of My Bookcase is to empower the reader by offering a creative space to unfold the knowledge gathered through private readings and bring individual knowledge into shared experience to support collective intelligence. My Bookcase was founded in 2014 by artist Cristina Garriga. In 2017, Katie Reid and Julia Doz joined Garriga to expand My Bookcase across the cities of Glasgow, Barcelona and Amsterdam. mybookcase.org

About OOMK: One of My Kind (OOMK) is a highly visual, handcrafted small-press publication. Printed biannually, its content pivots upon the imaginations, creativity and spirituality of women. Each issue centres around a different creative theme, with more general content exploring topics of faith, activism and identity. As well as producing a printed zine, OOMK is present online and hosts regular creative events including DIY Cultures. While OOMK welcomes contributions from women of diverse ethnic and spiritual backgrounds, it is especially keen to be inclusive of Muslim women. Studio OOMK is a design studio run by the editors of OOMK Zine, working with a host of clients, in particular galleries and museums, to host workshops, produce publications and undertake various projects. OOMK is run by Sofia Niazi, Rose Nordin and Heiba Lamara. oomk.net

About Publication Studio Glasgow: Publication Studio Glasgow is a collaboration with partners My Bookcase, Good Press Gallery, A Feral Studio and artist Joanna Peace. It is a publishing enterprise founded in 2009 in Portland, Oregon – an international network of sibling studios, with a presence in thirteen cities including New York, London, Rotterdam and now Glasgow. Publication Studio prints and binds books one at a time on-demand, creating original work with artists and writers. It is a laboratory for publication in its fullest sense – not just the production of books, but the production of a public. It is also an open source printing facility housed at CCA. Every few weeks, Publication Studio Glasgow runs inductions to teach people how to use the equipment, who can then book the space to make a small run of their own books. For more information and to book an induction email publicationstudioglasgow@gmail.com

About The Serving Library: The Serving Library is an artist-run non-profit organisation founded in 2011 to develop a shared toolkit for artist-centered education and discourse through related activities of publishing and collecting. It comprises a biannual journal (Bulletins of The Serving Library) published both online and in print, an archive of framed objects on permanent display, and a public programme of workshops and events. The Serving Library currently resides at Exhibition Research Lab, School of Art & Design at Liverpool John Moores University, where the gallery space serves as a satellite seminar room to host occasional classes for university-level art, design and writing students from schools across the world, as well as a regular series of public talks and exhibitions building upon the library’s archival material. servinglibrary.org

About Temporary Services: Temporary Services is Brett Bloom and Marc Fischer, and is based in Ft. Wayne (IN) and Chicago. Salem Collo-Julin worked with Temporary Services from 2001-2014. Temporary Services has existed, with several changes in membership and structure, since 1998, and produces exhibitions, events, projects and publications. Temporary Services started as an experimental exhibition space in a working class neighborhood of Chicago. The name directly reflects the desire to provide art as a service to others. It is a way for us to pay attention to the social context in which art is produced and received. Having “Temporary Services” displayed on the window helped to blend in with the cheap restaurants, dollar stores, currency exchanges and temporary employment agencies on the street. It was not immediately recognisable as an art space. This was partly to stave off the stereotypical role it might have played in the gentrification of the neighborhood. Experiencing art in the places we inhabit on a daily basis remains a critical concern. It helps to move art from a privileged experience to one more directly related to how we live our lives. A variety of people should decide how art is seen and interpreted, rather than continuing to strictly rely on those in power. Temporary Services collaborate amongst themselves and with others, even though this may destabilise how people understand the work. Temporaryservices.org

About Nick Thurston: Nick Thurston (b.1982, UK) is a writer and editor who makes artworks. He is the author or co-author of several books and editor of many more. Recent exhibitions include Reading as Art at Bury Museum & Sculpture Centre, 2016; Reading Matters at Printed Matter, New York, 2016 and Hate Library at Foksal Gallery, Warsaw, 2017. Since 2006, he has been co-editor of publishing collective Information As Material, with whom he was Writer in Residence at the Whitechapel Gallery, London, 2011-12. In 2014, he was Artist in Residence at the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin and in 2016 he was Visiting Research Fellow in Contemporary Writing at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. He teaches at the University of Leeds.

June 28, 2017