A collective voice for literature and languages in Scotland

#PayTheCreator – calling for all creative freelancers to be paid professionally and promptly

The Creators’ Rights Alliance (CRA) has launched a campaign: Pay the Creator. It calls for creators (creative freelancers) to be paid professionally and promptly, and to be given the same considerations enjoyed by other workers in the areas of pay, business support and policy making.

The CRA is asking everyone to share the #PayTheCreator hashtag, to link it to their campaigns for better practice and to call out good and bad examples of payment and contract practices.

How you can help:

As an organisation: Promote the campaign to your members via your newsletters and forums.

  • Download the Pay the Creator logo and use it on your website and email signatures – https://www.creatorsrightsalliance.org/paythecreator
  • Link your campaigns to the CRA website
  • Tell the CRA about the campaigns you’re running so they can share them with others; write to contact@creatorsrightsalliance.org.
  • Use #PayTheCreator on your social media feeds to highlight the best and worst in pay and contract practices.
  • Contact the CRA with case studies so they can highlight how these practices are affecting creators.
  • Pledge your support to the Pay the Creator campaign here.

As a creator:

  • Download the Pay the Creator logo to use on your own website and email signatures, linking to the Pay the Creator CRA page
  • Use #PayTheCreator on your social media feeds to highlight the best and the worst in pay and contract practices.
  • Pledge your support to the Pay the Creator campaign here.

As a member of the public: Use #PayTheCreator on your social media feeds. Pledge your support to the Pay the Creator campaign here.

As a Creative Business:

  • Use the Pay the Creator logo to show your support for the campaign to your team, colleagues in the industry, and the creators you work with.
  • Use #PayTheCreator on your social media feeds to show your support and to highlight your good practice.
  • Pledge your support to the Pay the Creator campaign here.

Nicola Solomon, chief executive of the Society of Authors and CRA chair, said: “It is always unacceptable to expect creators to receive ‘exposure’ or ‘experience’ in place of payments, but this has become especially prevalent throughout the pandemic. Our creative freelancers are a key cornerstone of our economy, providing important creativity, knowledge, and expertise. Without them our books, films, magazines, television, film, theatre and music venues would be empty, devoid of content. They have been dismissed far too long as irrelevant and unimportant to those who use their services and work, as well as to policy decision makers. This must stop. Pay the Creator brings together CRA member campaigns and the work they do tirelessly championing creators’ working rights.”

#PayTheCreator: The challenge

Too often creators are offered payment in kind, through “exposure” or “opportunity”, rather than financial payment for their work.  Creators’ work is the foundation of the largest sector within the UK economy. Yet their needs are repeatedly ignored when policy, economic and support decisions are being made.

The CRA and its members are working to ensure that all creators are:

  • Paid for the work they do, on time and reflecting their contributions, skills and worth
  • Recognised for the contribution they make to the creative industries, the UK’s economy, and our wellbeing
  • At the heart of the government’s and the creative industries’ policy and decision making processes 

Inequitable payment disproportionally affects those who are under-represented within the industry, limiting their chances to make a living from their creativity and to remain in the sector. It sets back any progress toward the inclusive industry that we all want to see. These unfair practices ensure that only those who come from backgrounds where they can be financially supported, can sustain a career in the sector.

Context

The creative industries are hugely important to our wellbeing. They contributed £115.9bn in Gross Value Added to the UK economy in 2019 – this was more than aerospace, automotive, life sciences and oil and gas sectors combined.

A third of people working in the creative industries are freelancers (33 per cent – around 2 million people). In some sections of the industry this proportion reaches 70 per cent. This is double the level of self-employment in the wider economy. (* Creative UK). Creative freelancers are a key cornerstone of our economy, with their work providing important creativity, knowledge and expertise.

A lack of professional and prompt payment makes this vital industry unnecessarily fragile, both in the short and the long-term. In a post-Brexit, post-pandemic world, we must nurture our assets to ensure we retain our world-leading economic and cultural vibrancy.

You can read more and add your support to their campaign by visiting the CRA Pay the Creator page: www.creatorsrightsalliance.org

*About Creators’ Rights Alliance (CRA) 
The CRA is a collective of organisations that exists to promote, protect and further the interests of creators through policy, advocacy and campaigning work. We incorporate represents the major membership organisations and trade unions who collectively represent over 350,000 individual members – from authors, artists, photographers and illustrators to translators, performers, musicians and journalists – although their true reach far exceeds this number, with thousands more working in the creative industries and benefiting from their work.

Reproduced from the CRA website and press release.

March 17, 2022