A collective voice for literature and languages in Scotland

Creative Scotland launches new initiative, Our Creative Voice

Creative Scotland, in collaboration with people and organisations from across the culture sector in Scotland, and with the support of Scottish Government, today launches a new initiative aimed at promoting the value that art and creativity contributes to all our lives.

With a dedicated website at its centre, Our Creative Voice is a new platform for demonstrating the tangible benefits that art and creativity contribute to our lives.

Our Creative Voice presents a range of case studies that evidence the impact that participation in arts and creativity has, supported by compelling data and researchOur Creative Voice also provides the tools for others to help make the case for culture, and the ambition is to grow and expand this initiative over the coming months and years.

For launch, a series of animations have been created by BAFTA winning animator Will Anderson for Our Creative voice, featuring the voices of people from across Scotland highlighting the difference creativity makes to their lives.

Among the extensive data available through Our Creative Voice, independent research tells us that:

  • the Creative Industries contribute £4.6bn to the Scottish economy each year, supporting 90,000 jobs – Latest Scottish Government Creative Industries Growth Sector Statistics, 2020
  • 63% of the Scottish public agree that arts and culture are an important part of their life – Scottish Opinion Survey 56 Degree Insight, December 2020
  • 84% believe it is right that there should be public funding of arts and cultural activities in Scotland – Scottish Opinion Survey 56 Degree Insight, December 2020
  • The most commonly reported benefits of taking part in creative activities are helping us to relax and making us feel good – 68% and 65% respectively - Scottish Opinion Survey 56 Degree Insight, December 2020
  • 93% of the Scottish population believes that creative activity is essential for children and young people’s learning and well-being - Scottish Opinion Survey 56 Degree Insight, December 2020

Speaking of the new approach, Iain MunroChief Executive Creative Scotland said:

“The evidence is overwhelming – art and creativity make an enormous difference to society in Scotland, making a vital contribution to our health and wellbeing, our communities, our education, our economy, and our environment.

“We want to tell that story as widely as possible to inform, influence and inspire people from all parts of society about the value of culture, support it and, ultimately, participate in any way they can.

“That’s what Our Creative Voice is about, and I’d like to encourage as many people as possible to find out more and to help us grow and develop this initiative by using the tools and assets and contributing their own case studies, evidence and stories.”

Culture Minister Jenny Gilruth said:

“I welcome this new, positive and proactive initiative from Creative Scotland and partners in Scotland’s culture sector.

“A key part of Scottish Government’s Culture Strategy is to empower people and communities through culture, and this initiative will make an important contribution to that, championing the benefits that culture delivers to us all and encouraging broader participation.

“I look forward to seeing Our Creative Voice develop and grow ever louder over the coming months.”

Jennifer Hunter, Director of Culture Counts said:

“I’ve been supportive of an initiative like this for a long time, so it’s great to see Our Creative Voice come to life.

“The campaign will be a powerful central voice in our collective work to raise awareness of the value of cultural participation and it’s also a great resource of stories and evidence for us all to tap into, complementing the work we all do in our specific art-forms. I will actively support its growth and development.”

-Ends-

Background

Access quotes from creative voices across the arts in Scotland on the importance of creativity.

Get the Facts from published research covering diverse sectors, such as health, tourism, education, social care and the economy, demonstrating the significant contribution that creativity makes to all our lives.

Read stories from people across Scotland sharing the life changing impact of art and creativity, on our health, economy, education, communities and more.

Spread the word and get involved by downloading the Our Creative Voice toolkit which contains all the info and assets you need to be a part of the campaign to build awareness of the value of art and creativity.

Creative Scotland is the public body that supports the arts, screen and creative industries across all parts of Scotland on behalf of everyone who lives, works or visits here. We distribute funding provided by the Scottish Government and The National Lottery.  Follow us on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

Media Contacts: You can find contact details of the Creative Scotland media team here.

September 8, 2021

CPG on Culture – Connection: Impact of Brexit on Scotland’s cultural sector, 25 Sept

The next CPG on Culture will be held on Tuesday 25 September 2018 between 5.30pm-8.00pm at the Scottish Parliament in Committee Room 2 and is entitled Connection: Impact of the Referendum on EU Membership on Scotland’s cultural sector.

The meeting will also be the AGM of the group.

A full agenda will be made available in due course, however the meeting will follow the usual format:

  • 5.30pm-6pm                Social Discussion
  • 6pm-6.10pm                AGM business
  • 6.10pm -6.40pm          Panel Presentations and Discussion
  • 6.40pm – 8pm              Group Discussion

Unfortunately, due to room capacity only 60 non-MSPs can be accommodated at the meeting. Demand is expected to be high so please RSVP to Karen.Dick@creativescotland.com  to secure your spot.

Details of proceedings will be posted on the website (www.cpgonculture.com) after the meeting.

September 13, 2018

Findings: Holyrood inquiry into CS Regular Funding 2018-21

Creative Scotland must urgently address its strategic failings following a catalogue of criticism from Scotland’s creative sector, says Holyrood’s Culture, Tourism, Europe and External Relations Committee.

The cross-party committee of MSPs say the organisation’s decision-making process on funding for touring theatre and dance companies fell “well below the standard expected” of a non-departmental public body.

In a 12 page letter to the Chief Executive Officer of Creative Scotland, the committee sets out the findings from its parliamentary inquiry into Regular Funding for 2018-21.

Committee Convener Joan McAlpine MSP said: “We received unprecedented levels of representations from within the sector following Creative Scotland’s handling of regular funding for 2018-21.

“With more than 50 responses from artists and arts organisations, it is clear to us that the confidence of a significant element of the cultural sector in Creative Scotland’s regular funding process has been badly damaged.

“In particular we felt that the handling of the process in relation to touring theatre and dance companies fell well below the standard that is expected from a non-departmental public body.”

Deputy Convener, Claire Baker MSP said: “The Committee has expressed serious concern over Creative Scotland’s Regular Funding for the 2018-21 period. We keenly await its written response to the issues we have raised and have set a deadline of 31 August. We will also invite representatives of Creative Scotland to appear before the committee again when Parliament returns from summer recess.”

Background

Joan McAlpine’s letter to Janet Archer, Chief Executive Officer of Creative Scotland, will be available on the Committee’s inquiry page.

Key findings and recommendations from the Committee’s inquiry include:

  • The Committee considers it is a serious matter that Creative Scotland’s evidence about whether the Board was aware of factual inaccuracies contained in assessment reports before its emergency meeting on 2 February has been challenged by the written evidence received. The Committee invites Creative Scotland to review this issue urgently and to report back on its findings.
  • The Committee is disappointed that the strategic issues identified by Creative Scotland were not recognised at an earlier stage so that they could be addressed before applications for regular funding were opened. The failure to do so left the sector in a very challenging position and has ultimately had an impact on a significant element of the cultural sector’s confidence in the regular funding process. . These issues must be urgently addressed by Creative Scotland so that a revised strategy is in place before applications for the next round of regular funding are opened. The Committee intends to scrutinise Creative Scotland’s plans for a refreshed strategy.
  • The Committee considers Creative Scotland’s handling of the regular funding decision-making process in relation to touring theatre and dance companies fell well below the standard that is expected from a non-departmental public body. Creative Scotland should have made a decision about touring companies’ eligibility for regular funding before applications were opened and communicated its decision clearly to the sector. The failure to do so has meant that artists and organisations have committed staff and financial resources unnecessarily to complete regular funding applications. This approach has hampered the sector’s trust in Creative Scotland and added to ongoing uncertainty for the sector at a time when the funding pressures on the sector are already high.
  • The cultural sector is concerned that too much regular funding is being directed away from artists towards network organisations. The Committee therefore invites Creative Scotland to consider an alternative model for the funding of network organisations going forward.

The above press release has been reproduced from the Scottish Parliament’s News & Media Centre here.   

June 15, 2018

LAS submission to Culture Committee

Following the Call for Views from the Parliamentary Committee for Culture, Tourism, Europe and External Relations, we submitted the following written response at the end of March 2018.

The Committee is due to share all written responses on the website from Wednesday 18 April 2018.

Literature Alliance Scotland (LAS) is the collective voice for Scotland’s literature and languages. We are a membership organisation committed to advancing the interests of literature and languages at home and abroad. As Scotland’s largest network for literature and languages, with more than 30 member organisations, we bring together writers, publishers, educators, librarians, literature organisations and national cultural bodies.

Last week we surveyed our membership anonymously for their views on Creative Scotland funding. We asked them to share the survey among their own networks and obtained 34 responses, which have informed this submission.

Respondents are writers, poets and people who work in publishing, festivals, teaching, charities and organisations involved with the literature, publishing and languages sector. They are based across Scotland, from the Outer Hebrides to Aberdeen and from Shetland to Wigtown.

Of the 121 organisations in the 2018-21 Regular Funding Network, nine represent the literature, languages and publishing sector. They were awarded just over £7m of the total RFO budget of £101.6m.

 

The extent to which Regular Funding supports the arts and creative organisations throughout Scotland

More than half of respondents (53%) consider Regular Funding to support the arts and creative organisations throughout Scotland ‘a great deal’, or ‘a lot’ (19%) while 22% say ‘a moderate amount’ and 6% ‘a little’.

The impact of awards for Regular Funding on other funding streams

This was a comment-only question. Key comments include:

  • With shrinking budgets and more money for RFOs, other funds such as Open Project Funding will become even more competitive with longer waiting times thereby inhibiting support for innovative work from individual artists and smaller organisations, especially those outwith the central belt.
  • Regular Funding offers stability and can open access to other match- or part-funding resources. However, ittakes up a large share of the total arts budget and can lead to unsuccessful bid organisations turning to Open Project Funding, involving more time spent on form-filling and rendering it even more oversubscribed.
  • Open Project Funding needs to be redesigned to accommodate the wide variety of applicants, from large organisations to individual writers and artists.
  • With so much focus placed on Regular Funding, the possibility of other funding sources being sustainable for an organisation’s future can often be ignored.
  • The exclusion of RFOs from applying for Open Project Funding could be perceived as an inhibitor of spontaneity over the three-year funding deal. Any deviation from the three-year programme of work would need to be in agreement with the organisation’s lead officer at CS and would mean that something else on the programme would need to give to allow a new initiative a chance.  

Other relevant issues

6% of respondents said there were errors and 3% said there were speculations in their RFO assessment. Another respondent stated that in addition to errors there were also assumptions and contradictions in their RFO assessment. 6% said there were no errors, assumptions or speculations in their RFO assessment. 65% of respondents didn’t apply for RFO.

47% of respondents agree or strongly agree with the statement ‘I am concerned that the recent RFO process introduced major strategic change at a late stage in the process without consultation.’

Link strategies to funding decisions

97% agree or strongly agree that there should be a clear link between Creative Scotland’s strategies and its funding decisions (assuming the strategies are sound).

Key comments:

  • Clear, well-communicated strategies are a must for organisations distributing public money. This also ensures equitable treatment of those applying for funds and makes it clear why applications were not successful.
  • However, there should be caution around strategies becoming agendas, and essentially reducing those strategies to a box-ticking exercise as part of the application process.
  • A policy of positive discrimination was suggested in order to contribute to the revitalisation of Scotland’s languages among all art forms and to adequately represent diversity.

 Funding flexibility

70% of respondents agree or strongly agree that there needs to be more flexibility in Creative Scotland’s funding routes and timescales to meet different needs within the sector.

Key comments:

  • Review all existing funding routes and strategic development routes, funding purposes, application processes (one form does not fit all), and the language used to make them more artist- and organisation-friendly, less competitive, and to encourage a more stable sector that is able to plan ahead (even if organisations are not RFOs).
  • Flexibility should be supported by transparency and accessibility.
  • A positive comment about the OpenProject Fund application was that it was exceptional in the timescales and with the help and advice offered during the application process.
  • Suggestions were put forward for a rolling programme for Regular Funding rather than once every three years. This would help with CS cash-flow and relieve the intense pressure in assessing applications, affording more time to better understand organisations being assessed, to fact-check and source evidence thereby reducing assumptions and errors. 

Decision-making and peer review

64% strongly agree or agree that decision-making should include appropriate peer review.

Key comments:

  • Peer review would empower artists by enabling the years of experience within the sector to reflect and influence its future.
  • Respondents questioned how to define ‘appropriate’ peer review and cautioned of the additional cost peer review is likely to entail and the potentially onerous impact on funding, timescales as well as the challenge of finding unbiased peers representing Scotland-wide, not just the central belt.
  • Alternative suggestions are for consultation with artists in setting criteria for funding and for strong formal and informal opportunities for feedback on decisions, or a panel of appropriate (non-CS) peer reviewers.
  • Other comments noted the strong backgrounds of CS officers in their art forms and highlighted the need for CS to rebuild trust and confidence so their expertise is respected and they can stand by decisions, which are rigorous and evidence-based.

Future priorities

Members were asked what Creative Scotland’s top priorities should be for the future as a comment-only question. The range of views have been prioritised below by volume.

  • Review all funding streams with input from artists and those working in the sector
  • Advocate for the importance of Scotland’s cultural sector by demonstrating its value
  • Be transparent in funding, decision-making and communications
  • Increase equitable access to culture
  • Equity in funding organisations and individual artists, and work Scotland-wide not just Central Belt.

 

April 17, 2018