A collective voice for literature and languages in Scotland

The Highland Book Prize 2019 shortlist

The Highland Book Prize organisers are delighted to announce the four books published in 2019 which judges deem the best titles with a Highland connection.

They are:

The Frayed Atlantic Edge: A Historian’s Journey from Shetland to the Channel by David Gange (William Collins)

Surfacing by Kathleen Jamie (Sort of Books)

Spring by Ali Smith (Penguin Random House)

Moder Dy by Roseanne Watt (Polygon)

The winner will be announced at the Ullapool Book Festival on Saturday May 9 2020 at a free-to-attend evening event, at which all four shortlisted authors will be present and will read from their work. The winner will receive a cash prize of £1000 and a place on a writing retreat at Moniack Mhor.

The judges made their selection of which books published during 2019 would make the shortlist and concluded:

The Frayed Atlantic Edge “An impressive intellectual and physical journey, allowing the reader to experience the Atlantic Coast from a fresh, deeply informed and invigorating perspective; rarely have our coastlines and cultures been explored with such understanding and respect.”

Surfacing “A compelling collection of essays, alive with captivating details and large – indeed, vital – ideas. With precision and eloquence, we are guided through deep time, expressive place and protean culture, the better to understand ourselves and our environment. What emerges is a book that not only melds clarity and depth, but does so while offering, and exemplifying, compassion, empathy and wisdom.”

Spring “An exciting, engrossing and timely novel, richly layered with necessary themes, marvellous characterisation and a transfixing plot. That the book achieves its ambitions with such persuasion, insight and unwavering commitment to sheer human decency is, in itself, a triumph.”

Moder Dy “To encounter a debut collection that is so emotionally and intellectually vivid is rare indeed. These poems – linguistically rich, profound, imaginative – announce a talent that is already making waves internationally. This is not only thoughtful, lyrical poetry but poetry that will last.”

The Highland Book Prize was established in 2017 to help celebrate the finest work that recognises the rich culture, heritage and landscape of the Highlands. The Highland Book Prize aims to showcase the literary talent of the region and to raise the profile of work created in or about the Highlands.

On behalf of the Highland Society of London, Alex Ogilvie said: “Thanks to our discerning panel of volunteer readers, the judges were presented with a diverse and high-quality longlist. Selecting the shortlist from those titles was a challenging but rewarding process, and I am delighted that each of the four outstanding books that we chose displays the author’s unique response to the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Across both fiction and non-fiction – but also, for the first time, poetry – the Highland Book Prize shortlist is truly representative of this wonderful region.”

Kevin MacNeil, writer and member of the judging panel commented: “Quite simply the most sublime shortlist I have ever read. I urge anyone interested in literature to treat their mind to anyone – better still, all – of these books. I feel like a wiser and more engaged human being for having had the pleasure of reading and re-reading them.”

Liz Beer, member of the judging panel and of the Ullapool Book Festival committee added: “2020 is our sixteenth year of running the Ullapool Book Festival. From small beginnings it has turned into a much-loved annual event for our audience, guest writers and chairmen/women not to mention the committee and volunteers. This will be the third year that we have hosted the Highland Book Prize and this year I had the pleasure of being one of the judges of this prize. It has been an absorbing process. In a weekend at Moniack Mhor the judges had in-depth discussions and debate and decided on the shortlist. I think we all feel that the list of four books is a strong one and very varied in content.”

For further information please contact Mirren Rosie or Eilidh Smith via:

Tel:                01463741675 or 07842040165

E-mail:          highlandbookprize@moniackmhor.org.uk

Visit:             www.highlandbookprize.org.uk

Twitter:         @highlandbook1

Instagram:    @highlandbookprize

Facebook:     @highlandbookprize

High-Resolution images and of each book cover and author are available to download here: https://we.tl/t-rEmJJLyHH8

ENDS   

NOTES TO EDITORS

Moniack Mhor, Scotland’s Creative Writing Centre is based fourteen miles from Inverness, just a stone’s throw away from Loch Ness. As well as five-day residential writing courses, the centre runs one-off events, day courses and works in partnership with other organisations to help people to enjoy creative writing in all its forms. www.moniackmhor.org.uk

The Highland Society of London is a charity which exists to promote and support the traditions and culture of the Highlands of Scotland.www.highlandsocietyoflondon.org

The first Ullapool Book Festival was held in May 2005. It was founded by a group of literary enthusiasts in Ullapool Entertainments, the local voluntary arts organisation founded in 1982. www.ullapoolbookfestival.co.uk

 The family shareholders of William Grant & Sons established the William Grant Foundation in 2014 as a non-profit association to oversee and direct their charitable donations. The William Grant Foundation is committed to a future where everyone in Scotland has the opportunity to thrive, a belief that is deeply rooted in the core values shared by the family and the company.www.williamgrantfoundation.org.uk

February 19, 2020

National Poetry Day 2017 – Thurs 28 Sept

National Poetry Day is coming! On Thursday, 28 September, the Scottish Poetry Library (SPL) will take the lead in Scotland in promoting the UK’s annual celebration of poetry and poets.

The theme for National Poetry Day (NPD) 2017 is ‘freedom’.

In addition to providing unique resources to mark the day, the SPL is co-hosting three events and supporting the launch of BBC Scotland’s Poet in Residence.

Poets Don Paterson, Christine De Luca and Hugh McMillan will read at special events to celebrate NPD.

Award-winner Paterson will read in the unique setting of the Jupiter Artland sculpture park outside Edinburgh.

Christine De Luca will mark the end of her time as Edinburgh Makar with the publication of a collection of poems about the capital, Edinburgh: Singing the City, which she will launch at the SPL on NPD.

At the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum in Ayr, Hugh McMillan will perform his own work alongside competition winners from Alloway Primary, who have written their own poems for NPD.

National Poetry Day also marks the launch of BBC Scotland’s Poet in Residence.

Earlier this year, after an open call for submissions, BBC Scotland announced the second poet to take up the post is Stuart A. Paterson (succeeding Rachel McCrum, who held the post in 2015).

The residency, which is four months long and will conclude on Burns Night, begins with Paterson performing his own specially-written poem about ‘freedom’ to mark National Poetry Day.

The poem will incorporate a distinctive local word as part of UK-wide NPD celebrations: on that day, each of the 12 regional BBC areas will broadcast 12 poems by 12 local poets, with each poem inspired by a distinctive local word chosen through a call out for listener suggestions across the country.

The SPL is already making available resources for teachers and readers specially commissioned for 2017’s NPD.

The notes are based on six poems, all on this year’s theme of ‘freedom’, which have been turned into poem postcards.

The poems are in English, Gaelic and Scots, and are available from public libraries in Scotland for free.

The poems chosen include work by Kathleen Jamie and Julia Donaldson.

Audio and educational content – exclusive to the SPL – based on the six poems is available on our website now at http://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/connect/national-poetry-day-2017-freedom.

– ENDS –

For further information, please contact Colin Waters
T: 0131-557-2876 or 0740-052-9150. E:
colin.waters@spl.org.uk

About the Scottish Poetry Library

The Scottish Poetry Library is a unique national resource and advocate for the art of poetry. The SPL is one of three poetry libraries in the UK, but the only one to be independently constituted and housed. The SPL now has over 45,000 items and has recently completed an extensive renovation of its building. Discover more about the SPL and its work throughout Scotland and beyond on the Library’s website: http://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk

About National Poetry Day

National Poetry Day is an annual celebration that inspires people throughout the UK to enjoy, discover and share poems. Everyone is invited to join in, whether by organising events, displays, competitions or by simply posting favourite lines of poetry on social media using #nationalpoetryday. National Poetry Day was founded in 1994 by the charity Forward Arts Foundation, whose mission is to celebrate excellence in poetry and increase its audience. Discover more about NPD: https://nationalpoetryday.co.uk/

 

September 27, 2017

Saltire Society Literary Awards 2016

LAS warmly congratulates all the winners of the Saltire Society Literary Awards announced last night (Thursday 24 November 2016) in a ceremony at Central Hall, Edinburgh.

Now recognised as Scotland’s foremost literary awards, the #SaltireLiterary Awards celebrate and support literary and academic excellence across six distinct categories with the winner of each of the individual book categories going forward to be considered for the Saltire Book of the Year Award.

The Book Award winners are:

Credit: saltiresociety.org.uk

Credit: saltiresociety.org.uk

The Publishing Award winners are:

2016 Saltire Society Publisher of the Year:
Floris Books

2016 Emerging Publisher of the Year Award:
Leah McDowell, Design and Production Manager at Floris Books

Congratulations to the shortlisted nominees too, listed here.

November 25, 2016