A collective voice for literature and languages in Scotland

LAS appoints Jenny Niven as new Chair

The Board of Trustees of Literature Alliance Scotland (LAS) is delighted to announce the appointment of Jenny Niven as its new Chair.

The appointment was unanimously approved by the LAS Board following an open recruitment process and Ms Niven will begin her three-year term in the role from the beginning of August 2021.

Jenny Niven said: “I am delighted and honoured to be taking up the role of Chair of Literature Alliance Scotland. Scottish literature and languages is full of talent and expertise, both in terms of individual writers, practitioners and producers, but also in the numerous internationally recognised organisations and institutions who all sit round the LAS table. I’m looking forward to working with so many respected friends and colleagues and to playing a role in championing our collective voice, while working to understand the needs of Scotland’s writers and organisations as we rebuild post-Covid.

“We’re in interesting times, to say the least, and we need strong representation for the role of the arts across society and the vital contribution made by writers and professionals in the sector. Literature has always played an exciting role in how we tell our stories and there are lots of possibilities and challenges ahead, from Scotland’s Year of Stories to harnessing digital to showcase and promote Scottish writing in a new era internationally. With LAS’ recent brilliant work in recognising the diversity of writing in Scotland and creating real talent development platforms, there is plenty to do; I feel privileged to be entrusted to get started and to play a part in our collective rebuilding effort at this crucial time.”

Jenny Niven is a highly regarded and well-known figure operating within the literature, languages and publishing sector. As a freelance producer and director, she is the director of Push the Boat Out, a new festival of poetry, spoken word and hip hop, which launches for the first time in Edinburgh in October 2021. She is also Executive Producer at the Edinburgh International Culture Summit Foundation and a sought-after chair for literature events, having interviewed a wealth of leading authors worldwide.

From 2014-2019, Jenny was Head of Literature, Languages and Publishing at Creative Scotland, where she provided strategic guidance across the sector, and fostered investment in hundreds of organisations and writers. During her time at Creative Scotland, Jenny led in the creation of the sectoral review of Literature and Publishing in Scotland, the Muriel Spark 100 Centenary celebrations in 2018, and Creative Scotland’s first Scots Language Policy.

In 2016, Jenny led the Edinburgh International Book Festival organisation on secondment as Acting Director over the winter months of 16/17, winning the festival a Herald Angel Award for the ground-breaking ‘Outriders’ program.

Jenny has worked internationally, as Associate Director at the Wheeler Centre for Books Writing and Ideas, Program Manager at the Melbourne Writers Festival and inaugural Director of The Bookworm International Literary Festival, in Beijing, China. She was also on the founding Board of the Stella Prize for Australian Women’s Writing and has judged a range of literary prizes.

Out-going Chair Peggy Hughes has been in the role since May 2017, leading the development of LAS to where it is now recognised as a vital connector between the organisations in the literature, languages and publishing ecosystem.

During her four-year term, Peggy has overseen the creation of a “life changing” career development programme, a series of challenging writer commissions, a new Writers’ Advisory Group and a host of professional development and networking opportunities for members and the wider sector at LAS meetings and events. Not to mention pivoting the programme to online and advocating for the sector throughout the pandemic.

Peggy Hughes, who will stand down as a Trustee at the AGM in the Autumn, said: “Scotland’s ecosystem of literature and languages is a rich, breathing, inspiring place to be, and it’s been my honour and pleasure to chair this network of organisations and practitioners working with and for it. The past 18 months have brought huge challenges and changes to the literature and creative sectors at large, but the Literature Alliance Scotland network has shown that innovation, imagination, resilience and collaboration can help us navigate the stormiest waters.

“Collectively, our priority is to ensure that our brilliant writers and readers, librarians and teachers, play makers and festival builders remain connected, that their work is amplified, that they are able to lean on and learn from each other, and Jenny Niven is a superlative Chair for the times we’re in, and for a network which creates the conditions ‘where the hammer hits the stane an sparks / ur made’ (as William Letford has it in his poem ‘This Is It’). I look forward very much to the next chapter of the story of this brilliant network under her leadership.”

 

 

July 14, 2021

Introducing the Writers’ Advisory Group 2021

We were delighted to receive so many strong applications to our April call-out for five published writers living and working in Scotland who want to advocate for writers on our Writers’ Advisory Group (WAG).

The WAG strengthens the advice to the Board which also comes from our writer members. It aims to develop direct contact with a more diverse and inclusive community and use the knowledge and expertise of all the writers we engage with to help shape our activities in providing what writers need.

The WAG will meet three times, in June, September and November 2021. Along with Projects and Communications Manager Jenny Kumar and LAS Trustee Vikki Reilly, they will discuss their agreed key issues and provide their knowledge and advice to help make sure that writers’ concerns are reflected in LAS activities and advocacy work.

We pay all our writers £175 per two-hour meeting in line with the Live Literature Funding rate and our Access Fund is available to assist with any accessibility requirements.

Meet our Writers’ Advisory Group 2021

AJ Clay is an Edinburgh-based nonbinary author who has been writing fiction and creative nonfiction since 2014. Their work has been published by Scottish Book Trust, Monstrous Regiment, Dangerous Women, and Shoreline Of Infinity Press. Their focus is on marginalised LGBTQ+ and working-class characters and amplifying under-represented voices. They are currently querying an own voices YA urban fantasy set in Edinburgh. In their spare time they engage in LGBTQ+ outreach as part of a global queer drag collective and write reviews of the bad films they watched in lockdown.
Twitter: @uisgebeatha
Instagram: @ajclayauthor
https://about.me/ajclay

 

 

Emily Dodd is an author of picture books and non-fiction science books, a screenwriter for CBeebies and a writer of BBC radio plays for children. She also writes and performs comedy and spoken word for adults. Emily loves being outside, drawing, playing football and wild swimming and travels widely, taking her interactive science events to schools, libraries and festivals. Emily lives on the Isle of Skye, the perfect place for adventures.
Twitter: @auntyemily
Instagram: @auntyemily
Facebook: auntyemily
https://auntyemily.wordpress.com/about/

 

Cal Flyn is an award-winning writer from the Highlands of Scotland. She writes literary nonfiction and long-form journalism. Her first book, Thicker Than Water which explored questions of colonialism and intergenerational guilt, was a Times book of the year. Her acclaimed second book, Islands of Abandonment—about the ecology and psychology of abandoned places—is out now. Cal’s journalistic writing has been published in Granta, The Sunday Times Magazine, Telegraph Magazine, The Wall Street Journal and others. She is a columnist for Prospect, deputy editor of literary recommendations site Five Books, and a regular contributor to The Guardian. Cal was made a MacDowell fellow in 2019.
Twitter: @calflyn
Instagram: @calflyn
calflyn.com

Sonali Misra (she/her) is an Indian author and PhD researcher in Publishing Studies at the University of Stirling. Her debut nonfiction, 21 Fantastic Failures, released in 2020 and her short prose has appeared in Scottish, Canadian and Indian anthologies. Most recently, she was a top-10 winner of the National Library of Scotland’s Fresh Ink programme, and her personal essay will be added to the Library’s archives. Sonali is the Co-founder of The Selkie Publications CIC, which publishes underrepresented voices, and Co-chair of the Society of Young Publishers Scotland. She has previously worked in editorial and product roles in Indian publishing at organisations such as Scholastic and Hachette.
Twitter: @MisraSonali
Instagram: @sonali.writes
www.sonalimisra.com

 

Credit: Dave Parry

Heather Parry is a Glasgow-based writer and editor. Her short stories and nonfiction have appeared internationally in numerous magazines and books, and she is currently working on her first novel. She is the editorial director of Extra Teeth, a Scottish literary magazine, co-presents the podcast Teenage Scream and with comics artist Maria Stoian, received Creative Scotland funding to create The Illustrated Freelancer’s Guide, a free resource to assist self-employed creatives in understanding their working rights and protections. She also organises for creative freelancers with the IWW.
Twitter: @heatherparryuk
Instagram: @heatherparryuk

 

Following their first meeting June, the WAG will focus on the following issues:

  1. Increased inclusivity with more opportunities particularly for LGBT+ community, Gaelic learners and writers, the literary community outwith the Central Belt, children’s writers and international residents with fixed-term visas.
  2. Increased accessibility for events (especially digital) and development opportunities for disabled people and those with a chronic illness, neurodiverse people, people from lower socio-economic backgrounds.
  3. Creative freelancers /Authors’ Rights, particularly payment and income; contracts Code of Conduct – publishers/ orgs; and inequalities within the arts funding frameworks.
  4. Global opportunities afforded by digital events and looking at models of intercommunity support, non-competitiveness and Scottish identity to better promote Scotland’s writing across the UK and internationally.
July 12, 2021

Prìosanachd nan Còisir / The Choirs’ Imprisonment by Sandy NicDhòmhnaill Jones

Tha sinn air ar dòigh a bhith a’ foillseachadh ar ciad Òraid Litreachais de 2021 – dàn dealasach le Sandaidh NicDhòmhnaill Jones, Bàrd a’ Chomuinn Ghàidhealaich, a tha cliùiteach mar bhàrd, seinneadair, co-ghleusaiche, clarsair agus cànanaiche, mu bhacaidhean air luchd-ealain tron ghlasadh-sluaigh.

Leugh Prìosanachd nan Còisir / The Choirs’ Imprisonment

Faodaidh tu cuideachd èisteachd ri Sandaidh a’ leughadh an dàin aice sa Ghàidhlig agus an uair sin sa Bheurla air SoundCloud. Gheibhear seo fo na pìosan sgrìobhte air ar làraich-lìn aig a’ cheangal gu h-àrd.

Gabh pàirt sa chòmhradh air Twitter a’ cleachdadh #LiteratureTalks2021

Bidh LAS a’ coimiseanadh Literature Talks 2021 – sreath de pìosan sgrìobhaidh leis na prìomh sgrìobhadairean agus luchd-litreachais ann an Alba, ag iarraidh orra còmhradh a thòiseachadh gus atharrachaidhean san àrainneachd litreachais a bhrosnachadh.

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We’re thrilled to launch our first Literature Talks commission of 2021 – a passionate poem on the frustrations of artists in lockdown by Gaelic Crowned Bard, prizewinning poet, singer, composer, harpist and linguist, Sandy NicDhòmhnaill Jones.

Read Prìosanachd nan Còisir / The Choirs’ Imprisonment

You can also listen to Sandy reading her poem in Gaelic followed by the translation in English via SoundCloud. The link is included below the written version on the above link.

Please join the conversation on Twitter using #LiteratureTalks2021

Literature Talks 2021 is a series of pieces commissioned by LAS, asking Scotland’s leading writers and literature producers to respond to the literary landscape by starting a conversation that challenges us to make change happen.

July 8, 2021

Introducing the Next Level 2021 Awardees

We’re thrilled to introduce the Next Level Awardees for 2021: Keira Brown and Heather McDaid.

Next Level is LAS’ career development programme that aims to equip two mid-career arts professionals on the path to a senior position with the intended outcome of increasing diversity within the literature, languages and publishing sector. The free Programme includes training, mentoring and facilitated industry connections tailored to each Awardee’s career goals. As both Awardees are freelancers, they will each receive a Living Wage stipend to cover their time participating in the Programme. This is supported by our funding from Creative Scotland.

Peggy Hughes, LAS Chair, said: “We’re thrilled to appoint Keira and Heather who both have the ambition to make positive change in the literature, languages and publishing sector. We’ve seen the impact that Next Level has had on awardees’ mindsets and driving forward their career goals and we can’t wait to work with Keira and Heather and see the positive outcomes from their journey. Both Awardees are freelancers and we appreciate how important this time and space is to allow for reflection on career development while having a dedicated support to take the steps towards future goals and aspirations.”

Keira Brown said: “I am excited to be chosen for the Next Level programme and to see what opportunities for development stem from the programme. Whilst working on Paisley Book Festival I have been keen to learn and grow in areas of accessibility, outreach and engagement, as it feels like a festival in which we can really expand and offer a great deal in these fields. As an industry freelancer, I am enormously grateful for the time and insight offered from others in the literature sector and look forward to the valuable knowledge and learning that will come from Next Level. It’s fantastic that Literature Alliance offer such a space for professional development.”

Heather McDaid said: I’m delighted to have been selected for the Next Level programme. As a freelancer, I have been able to work with a number of organisations I admire these last few years, and through my own publisher 404 Ink have been able to undertake a lot of work and projects on what matters most personally, including strides to demystify and make the publishing industry more accessible for those looking to enter it, as writers or behind the scenes. The opportunity to focus on these ideas and longer-term goals, and work towards making that a reality, is something I’m really excited about. I’ve found great support within Scotland’s thriving literature sector in my own career, and hope that as my work progresses, particularly with the amazing support of Literature Alliance Scotland now, I can continue to pay that forward for those to come.”

 

Keira Brown has an in depth understanding of the commercial side within the book trade and the long-term impact of book events. She has a local knowledge of the writing and spoken word scene in Scotland having co-produced Paisley Book Festival two years running. As well as the work she does for the literature sector she is also Editor of cultural review site, The Fountain, and Board Trustee for Scottish PEN.
@DowntownKeiraB
https://thefountain.scot

 

 

Heather McDaid is an award-winning publisher and freelancer. She is currently co-founder of indie publisher 404 Ink, Books Editor at The Skinny magazine, and Events and Programme Support Officer at Publishing Scotland. Previous roles have included Coordinator of The Saltire Society’s virtual book festival #ScotLitFest, and Co-Chair of the Society of Young Publishers Scotland; she has worked in a freelance capacity with organisations including Scottish Book Trust, BHP Comics, Canongate, Girlguiding Scotland, and many more. She received the London Book Fair Trailblazers award for those ‘blazing a trail through their 20s’, was jointly awarded the Saltire Society Emerging Publisher of the Year, shortlisted for the Kim Scott Walwyn Prize for the professional achievements and promise of women in publishing, and was named by Margaret Atwood as ‘a woman shaping the future’ based on her work within publishing.
@heathermmcd
heathermcdaid.com

June 14, 2021

LAS seeks new Chair

Literature Alliance Scotland is looking to appoint a new Chair of the Board of Trustees in June 2021 with a sound knowledge of and passion for Scottish literature and languages at a local, national and international level. Familiarity with the principles and practice of leadership, advocacy, management and knowledge of the principles of corporate governance are also valuable.

We want our Board and activity to have broader representation from all communities and actively encourage applications from people of colour and those from ethnically diverse communities as well as people who identify as working-class, disabled, LGBTQ+ and their intersections. We reserve the right to supplement the shortlist with invited candidates.

We’d intend for the new Chair to take up their role in June 2021. The current Chair, Peggy Hughes, intends to continue as a Trustee until the AGM in the Autumn to ensure a smooth handover.

Literature Alliance Scotland (LAS) is a membership organisation committed to advancing the interests of literature and languages at home and abroad. With more than 30 member organisations, we’re Scotland’s largest literary network for literature and languages, bringing together writers, publishers, educators, librarians, literature organisations and national cultural bodies.

As LAS is a SCIO (Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation), the Chair role is  voluntary and unpaid, however, reasonable out of pocket expenses will be met.

Please see below for further information about the role and candidate’s qualities and experience.

The Chair serves for a term of three years, which is renewable for a further term of three years.

If you’re interested in being the new Chair of LAS, please send a CV (two pages max) and a short  accompanying statement (one page max) telling us why you’d like to get involved and what you think you can offer. Please email your CV and statement to LAS Chair Peggy Hughes via  admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk

The deadline for applications is midnight on Fri 4 June 2021.

We will contact shortlisted candidates to arrange a convenient time to meet via Zoom with LAS Chair Peggy Hughes, Projects and Communications Manager Jenny Kumar and another Trustee to have an informal interview.

If you have any questions, please contact Peggy Hughes via admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk 

Information about being the Chair of Literature Alliance Scotland.

About LAS

Literature Alliance Scotland (LAS) is a membership organisation committed to advancing the interests of literature and languages at home and abroad. It is Scotland’s largest literary network for literature and languages, of more than 30 member organisations, bringing together writers, publishers, educators, librarians, literature organisations and national cultural bodies.

Our vision is that LAS is a trusted, strong collective voice for Scotland’s literature and languages, which are celebrated locally, nationally and internationally.

LAS was formed in spring 2015 as successor to the Literature Forum for Scotland, which was first set up in 2001, at the invitation of the then Literature Committee of the Scottish Arts Council. In 2006, following a review of its remit by the Scottish Arts Council, the Literature Forum was formally recognised as a national Advisory Council for Literature, and acted in this capacity. In mid-2014, Literature Forum members decided to review the organisation’s future role and to consider how it should develop to become a stronger and more inclusive voice for literature and languages in Scotland and abroad, leading to the transition in spring 2015 to Literature Alliance Scotland.

Our 2021 programme of work – A New Chapter: To Meet The Times We’re In – places equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI) at its heart and offers two interconnected programme strands of ‘upskill’ and ‘connect and collaborate’ supported by effective communications and advocacy that will:

  1. Deliver a responsive programme for members and the sector to better communicate, connect and collaborate in challenging times.
  2. Be more inclusive and accessible to engage more people and diverse voices
  3. Provide professional development opportunities for members
  4. Utilise improved digital communications to advocate for the sector and tell the stories of Scotland’s literature and languages.

This will give us the tools to become a healthier, more robust, and resilient ecosystem for the collective good of our membership and our sector.

The LAS membership actively participate in shaping and contributing to LAS’ main areas of work: our Writers’ Advisory Group; our Literature Talks series of writing commissions; our “lifechanging” career development programme Next Level for mid-career literature professionals not represented at senior levels; championing the sector through advocacy and at events; our members’ professional development programme; and at our dynamic meetings and annual Sector Away Day & AGM offering rich learning, discussion and connection.

Our income comes from membership fees and funding from The National Lottery through Creative Scotland.

LAS became a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Institution (SCIO) in March 2016. Under its Constitution LAS has a Board of Trustees elected by the membership at the Annual General Meeting, which takes place in the Autumn. The Board is headed by a Chair and Co-Vice-Chair(s) and these office bearer roles, along with a Treasurer, are appointed from amongst the Board of Trustees by the Trustees.

ROLE DESCRIPTION

Key Responsibilities

  • Advance the interests of Scottish literature and languages at a local, national and international level.
  • Fulfil a strong ambassadorial role for Scottish literature and languages in consultation with members of Literature Alliance Scotland.
  • Provide leadership to the Board of Trustees and Members of Literature Alliance Scotland and ensure that Trustees and Members fulfil their duties and responsibilities as a SCIO (Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation).

Main Duties

  • Provide leadership to the Board of Trustees and Members in setting the future strategy for Literature Alliance Scotland.
  • Ensure that the values and objectives of Literature Alliance Scotland are regularly reviewed.
  • Ensure the organisation complies with its constitution, charity law and any other relevant legislation or regulation.
  • Establish policies and procedures to govern organisational activity
  • Ensure that the charity pursues its objectives as defined in its governing document
  • Chair the Board and Member meetings and oversee an effective administration and its financial stability.
  • Represent Literature Alliance Scotland and promote the organisation to government, local authorities, external partners, stakeholders and funders.
  • Work closely with the Projects and Communications Manager to deliver the programme.

Time commitment

We anticipate an average of 2.5 hours per week, which includes a regular catch up with the Projects & Communications Manager. Additionally, there will be time chairing the Trustees’ Zoom meetings (3 remaining in 2021, duration 60 mins each), Member Zoom meetings (3 remaining in 2021, duration 90mins each) as well overseeing the virtual Sector Away Day and AGM in the Autumn and occasional meetings representing the sector. The Chair also leads on fundraising responsibilities in concert with the Board of Trustees.

Expenses

As LAS is a SCIO, all Trustees, which includes the Chair, volunteer their time and the role is unpaid, however, out-of-pocket expenses reasonably incurred in connection with carrying out the Chair’s duties will be met.

Candidate Qualities

Knowledge & experience

  • A sound knowledge of and active experience with Scottish literature and languages at a local, national and international level
  • Strong commitment to the vision and objectives of Literature Alliance Scotland
  • Be committed to devoting the necessary time and effort to the role of Chair
  • Good independent judgment and the ability to think creatively.
  • Familiarity with the principles and practice of leadership and management
  • Knowledge of the principles of corporate governance.
  • Acquaintance with leadership and management within the public sector
  • Familiarity with working collectively and in partnership.

 Skills

  • An understanding and acceptance of the legal duties, responsibilities and liabilities of trusteeship. Strategic thinking and problem solving
  • Strong ambassadorial skills
  • Sound independent thinker and ability to think creatively
  • Ability to work as a member of a team
  • Managing finance and accounts
  • Excellent spoken and written communications skills

The deadline for applications is midnight on Fri 4 June 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 10, 2021

LAS seeks writers for Advisory Group

Literature Alliance Scotland (LAS) is looking to appoint a new cohort of five published writers living and working in Scotland for our 2021 Writers’ Advisory Group.

With writer organisations already active in our membership, we want to build on the success of the first Group of writers which strengthened the advice to our Board from a diverse and inclusive writing community.

Our second Writers’ Advisory Group will enable a direct and formalised channel of communication between writers and their communities, the LAS Board and the membership network. They will provide expert knowledge to help ensure that the key issues that affect writers are at the heart of the LAS mission and strategy and are reflected in our activities and advocacy work.

More details about the Writers’ Advisory Group’s purpose and role are below.

We want the Advisory Group to reflect Scottish literature in its diversity of language, genre, form and geography. We seek to ensure broad representation from all communities and actively encourage applications from under-represented groups, particularly people of colour and those from ethnically diverse communities as well as people who identify as working-class, disabled, LGBTQ+ and their intersections. We reserve the right to supplement the shortlist with invited candidates.

This is a paid opportunity and the five writers selected for the Advisory Group will be paid in line with the Live Literature Funding rate of £175 per session, with the three meetings to be held virtually on Zoom.

Please email your writing CV (2 pages maximum) and a short covering letter to LAS Chair Peggy Hughes via admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk telling us why you’d like to be involved and outlining up to three of the main concerns and/ or opportunities that you’d like the Advisory Group to address in no more than 200 words.

The deadline is midnight on Wed 26 May 2021.

FURTHER INFORMATION:

About LAS

Literature Alliance Scotland (LAS) is a membership organisation committed to advancing the interests of Scotland’s literature and languages at home and abroad. We are Scotland’s largest literary network of more than 30 member organisations, bringing together writers, publishers, educators, librarians, literature organisations and national cultural bodies. LAS provides a collective voice for Scotland’s literature and languages, which are celebrated locally, nationally and internationally.

LAS was formed in spring 2015 as a successor to the Literature Forum for Scotland, which was first set up in 2001, at the invitation of the then Literature Committee of the Scottish Arts Council. In 2006, following a review of its remit by the Scottish Arts Council, the Literature Forum was formally recognised as a national Advisory Council for Literature and acted in this capacity. In mid-2014, Literature Forum members decided to review the organisation’s future role and to consider how it should develop to become a stronger and more inclusive voice for literature and languages in Scotland and abroad, leading to the transition in spring 2015 to Literature Alliance Scotland and a period of development work from 2016-2018. We introduced the Writers’ Advisory Group in our 2018-2020 our programme, Turning the Next Page: future proofing the sector to 2020 and beyond, to help us to raise the volume of the sector louder than ever before. The contribution of the Advisory Group during the pandemic in 2020 was vital and in this year’s programme of work, A New Chapter: To Meet the Times We’re In, we aim to build on that success with another cohort of writers.

Our income comes from membership fees and funding by The National Lottery through Creative Scotland. LAS became a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Institution (SCIO) in March 2016. Under our Constitution, we have a Board of Trustees elected by the members at the Annual General Meeting, headed by a Chair and two co-Vice-Chairs and with a Treasurer.

About the LAS Writers’ Advisory Group

Our Writers’ Advisory Group will enable a direct and formalised channel of communication between writers, our Board, and the LAS membership network, providing expert knowledge to help ensure that writers’ concerns are at the heart of the LAS mission and strategy and are reflected in our activities and advocacy work.

The members of the Advisory Group will together represent the broader writing community and will perform an advocacy role on behalf of their own writing communities and on the key issues that affect writers.

With writer organisations already active in our membership, the aim is to enhance the advice from a diverse and inclusive writing community to our Board. Key points raised from the meetings will be shared, as appropriate and in agreement with you, with our Board, with Creative Scotland and the Scottish Government’s Culture Division.

We want the Advisory Group to reflect Scottish literature in its diversity of language, genre, form and geography. We seek to ensure broad representation from all communities and actively encourage applications from under-represented groups, particularly people of colour and those from ethnically diverse communities as well as people who identify as working-class, disabled, LGBTQ+ and their intersections. We reserve the right to supplement the shortlist with invited candidates.

The Advisory Group will meet three times in 2021, in June, September and November, where you will work in collaboration with Jenny Kumar, LAS’ Projects and Communications Manager and/or LAS Trustee Vikki Reilly, to discuss key issues and share your advice and recommendations that will help shape our advocacy and activities.

Each member of the Advisory Group will be paid the Live Literature Funding recommended rate of £175 per meeting. We plan to run the meetings virtually on Zoom. We have an Access Fund for the 2021 programme open to all WAG members to help provide support such as BSL interpretation, childcare and other caring or respite costs. Please tells us how we can help make the meetings accessible in your letter.

We consider published writers to be those who have had a minimum of two pieces of writing of any form to be published in print or online.

The first meeting of the Writers’ Advisory Group 2021 will take place on Thursday 17 June, 2-3.30pm on Zoom.

How to apply

Please email your writing CV (2 pages maximum) and a short letter addressed to LAS Chair Peggy Hughes via admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk telling us why you’d like to be involved and outlining up to three of the main concerns and/ or opportunities that you’d like the Advisory Group to address in no more than 200 words.

DEADLINE: midnight on Wed 26 May 2021

First meeting dateThursday 17 June, 2-3.30pm on Zoom.

Successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date and in good time ahead of the first meeting on Zoom

April 29, 2021

Next Level 2021 now open for arts professionals


Are you a freelancer or employee working with a literature/languages organisation in Scotland with the ambition and energy to lead? 

Apply to Next Level 2021 for 1:1 online mentoring, training & networking opportunities tailored to your career goals.

The Next Level Programme 2021 is a career development programme that aims to equip two arts professionals on the path to a senior position with the intended outcome of increasing diversity within our sector.

It’s designed for two arts professionals (sometimes called arts admin or literature professionals in roles such as Assistant, Coordinator, Officer, Executive, Manager) who are either employed by or work as a freelancer with an organisation in Scotland’s literature, languages and publishing sector.

The 2021 programme is for people with 4 to 6 years’ experience of working in the sector and who would not define themselves as working at senior management level. It includes up to 80 contact hours (10 days), delivered digitally due to Covid-19, over six months from May 2021.

We particularly welcome applications from candidates who are from Black, Asian and ethnically diverse communities and those who identify as working-class and/or disabled and their intersections.

The deadline for applications is midnight on Wed 12 May 2021.

The two Awardees will each receive:

  • 4 x 60-minute, one-to-one online mentoring sessions with an industry professional working in, for example, publishing, bookselling, programming, libraries
  • Training in presentation skills and how to make an impact (delivered virtually)
  • Conversations with industry professionals (via telephone/video call).

We’ll cover the costs of:

  • Training
  • Mentoring
  • A living wage stipend can be available where the successful applicant would not be paid for their time participating in the programme.

How to apply:

Download our application pack from the website and email the completed application form and nomination form to Jenny Kumar, LAS Projects & Comms Manager, on admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk with a short covering letter by midnight on Wed 12 May 2021.

Informal interviews will be held on Zoom on Wed 19 May 2021.

Not sure if it’s for you? Email Jenny on admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk

 

April 14, 2021

Standard English is oor Second Language by Graeme Armstrong

We’re excited to launch our latest Literature Talks commission today – an incredible piece on the use of dialect in literary fiction in Scotland by The Times bestselling author of The Young Team, Graeme Armstrong.

Read Standard English is oor Second Language by Graeme Armstrong.

*Please note that the piece does contain strong language*

You can also listen to Graeme reading his piece via SoundCloud. The link is included below the written version on the above link.

Please join the conversation on Twitter using #LiteratureTalks

Literature Talks is a series of pieces commissioned by LAS, asking Scotland’s leading writers and literature producers to reflect on an aspect of Scotland’s literary landscape.

March 25, 2021

The Armchair Island Traveller by Gavin Francis

We’re delighted to launch our latest Literature Talks commission today – a timely reminder of the power of books and imagination to transport us to different places and times by writer and doctor Gavin Francis.

Read The Armchair Island Traveller by Gavin Francis

Please join the conversation on Twitter using #LiteratureTalks

Literature Talks is a series of pieces commissioned by LAS, asking Scotland’s leading writers and literature producers to reflect on an aspect of Scotland’s literary landscape.

December 2, 2020

LAS introduces Next Level Round Two Awardee

We’re thrilled to introduce our Awardee for Round Two of the Next Level Programme: Katalina Watt

Next Level is LAS’ pilot career development programme that aims to equip two mid-career arts professionals (in two rounds) on the path to a senior position with the intended outcome of increasing diversity within the literature, languages and publishing sector. The Programme is supported by our funding from Creative Scotland.

Peggy Hughes, LAS Chair, said: “We’re thrilled to appoint Katalina as our Round Two Next Level Awardee and we’ve already started working with her on a tailored programme of connections and training to support her development. Katalina has such focus and drive, and her commitment to passing down the ladder to help others rise is testament to the leader we know she will become.”

Katalina Watt said: “I am delighted to be selected for the Next Level programme and can’t wait to see what opportunities, connections, and skills grow and develop from the programme. Both accessibility and elevating the voices of those still underrepresented in the arts are essential to my work in publishing, and I have always been inspired by and grateful for those who make the time to share their insights and pay it forward to others in the industry. That’s the kind of leader I hope to become and I’m so excited to work with Literature Alliance Scotland on this next step in my career.”

In addition, we were so impressed with the calibre of the other interview candidates that we have repurposed funding to help support them with some next steps in their career. The three ‘Next Steps’ awardees are Beth Cochrane, Stefan Kellhofer and Catrin Kemp who we’re working with to facilitate two industry connections and a mentoring session.

Katalina Watt is Audio and Online Assistant at Canongate Books, working across the digital list in both audio and ebook. She is also Podcast Director for khōréō, a quarterly magazine of speculative fiction elevating voices of immigrant and diaspora authors. She has experience in Audio for Little Brown Book Group, and events and bookselling for independent bookshops, most recently at Golden Hare Books. Katalina is also an author and was Longlisted for Penguin WriteNow 2020. She studied English Literature at the University of Glasgow and completed an MSc in Publishing at Edinburgh Napier.

December 1, 2020

How Are You Sleeping? By Hannah Lavery

We’re excited to launch our latest Literature Talks commission today – an intense and thought-provoking reflection on wellbeing in these challenging times by award-winning poet, playwright and performer Hannah Lavery.

Read How Are You Sleeping? by Hannah Lavery.

Hannah joined Janice Forsyth on The Afternoon Show on BBC Radio Scotland on Mon 16 Nov to talk about writing the piece. It was featured as a show highlight and you can listen again here. (10mins)

Join the conversation on Twitter using #LiteratureTalks.

Literature Talks is a series of pieces commissioned by LAS, asking Scotland’s leading writers and literature producers to reflect on an aspect of Scotland’s literary landscape.

 

 

November 2, 2020

Arts professionals / freelancers wanted for Next Level Round Two

Are you a freelancer or employee working with a literature/languages organisation in Scotland with the ambition and energy to lead? 

Apply to Round 2 of Next Level for 1:1 online mentoring, training & networking opportunities tailored to your career goals.

The Next Level Programme is a pilot career development programme that aims to equip two mid-career arts professionals on the path to a senior position with the intended outcome of increasing diversity within our sector.

 

It’s designed for a mid-career arts professional who’s either employed by or works as a freelancer for an organisation in Scotland’s literature & languages sector.

This second round is for one person and includes up to 80 contact hours (10 days), delivered digitally due to Covid-19, over three months from November 2020.

We particularly welcome applications from those who self-identify as a Person of Colour (POC), working-class and/or disabled and their intersections.

You’ll get:

  • 4 x 60-minute, one-to-one online mentoring sessions with an industry professional working in, for example, publishing, bookselling, programming, libraries
  • Training in presentation skills and how to make an impact (delivered virtually)
  • Conversations with industry professionals (via telephone/video call).

We’ll cover the costs of:

  • Training
  • Mentoring
  • A living wage stipend can be available where the successful applicant would not be paid for their time participating in the programme.

We consider mid-career to be someone with 4 to 6 years’ experience of working in the sector and who would not define themselves as working at senior management level.

How to apply:

Download our application pack from the website and email the completed application form and nomination form to Jenny Kumar on admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk with a short covering letter by the deadline.

This opportunity is now closed for applications.

 

October 13, 2020

LAS welcomes Super Power Agency & Scottish BAME Writers’ Network to membership

We’re delighted to announce that The Super Power Agency and The Scottish BAME Writers’ Network, have joined LAS as a Network Associate and Full Member, respectively. We’re looking forward to working with both these fantastic organisations and their teams more closely.

The Super Power Agency (SPA) is working with Scotland’s most disadvantaged and under-resourced young people aged 8-18 years to change the statistic that one quarter of all Scots pupils, leave primary school functionally illiterate. Their creative writing workshops, interdisciplinary programmes, and mentoring make learning fun. They encourage pupils to put pen to paper, build their writing skills and express themselves with confidence. Currently partnered with 12 schools, SPA volunteers share their time and talent to support the work of young writers, teachers and youth workers. Ultimately, they’d like to bring their writing workshops to schools and communities throughout Scotland. SPA is dedicated to showcasing the written works of the young people who take part in their projects and have already published eighteen books of their writing through their own imprint Super Power Books. One of the first ‘The Leither’s Guide to Leith’ is now housed in the archives of the National Library of Scotland – quite an accomplishment for its young authors. SPA can be found on: Twitter @superpow3; Instagram:@Superpoweragency; Facebook: @superpoweragency; and LinkedIn: Superpoweragency

The Scottish BAME Writers Network (SBWN) provides advocacy, literary and professional development networking opportunities for BAME writers based in or from Scotland. Since 2018 they have worked to facilitate necessary conversations around inclusive programming in an effort to overcome systemic barriers that BAME writers often face. As an organisation run by people of colour SBWN prioritises BAME-led opportunities and are keen to spotlight and promote the diverse literary voices in Scotland while remaining as accessible as possible to marginalised groups. SBWN can be found on Twitter @ScotBAMEwriters

 

August 3, 2020

LAS supports sector call-to-action

Literature Alliance Scotland (LAS) is proud to collaborate with the Scottish BAME Writers’ Network and we support their Call to Action to the Scottish Literary sector.

We believe that Black Lives Matter, and we know that words alone are not enough.

That’s why we’re committing to working with our members on developing an action plan that will make real changes in actively addressing racial inequalities and structural privilege in Scotland’s Literature, Languages and Publishing sector.

As part of this, we’re reviewing our own structures and reflecting on how we can ensure that Black voices and people of colour are included in decision-making positions at LAS.

We can all do better and we must.

 

 

June 12, 2020

LAS announces Next Level Awardee

We’re delighted to introduce our inaugural Next Level Awardee: Nyla Ahmad.

Next Level is LAS’ pilot career development programme that aims to equip two mid-career arts professionals (in two separate rounds) on the path to a senior position with the intended outcome of increasing diversity within the literature, languages and publishing sector. The Programme is supported by our funding from Creative Scotland.

We’re excited to be working with Nyla and are already making good progress on her tailored development programme, which will include mentoring, one-to-one personal training, industry introductions and shadowing opportunities.

Peggy Hughes, LAS Chair, said: We’re delighted to have Nyla as our first Next Level professional and to connect her with leaders in the arts community to support her development. Nyla’s impressive ambition, energy and commitment to sharing positive change is clear for all to see and we know she’ll make a significant impact now and in the future.”

Nyla Ahmad said: I am honoured to have been selected for the Next Level programme. The core tenet of my work is supporting those from marginalised backgrounds to become involved in the arts, with my passion lying specifically in bringing the life-changing magic of books to as many people as possible. I am excited to see what knowledge, skills and opportunities I will gain through this Programme. Books have changed my life for the better and I am so glad I get to work in Scotland’s literary sector and bring that joy to others. As my career progresses, that joy and my ability to spread it can only grow.”

 

Nyla Ahmad is Reading Communities Manager at Scottish Book Trust, leading on programming Book Week Scotland. Nyla previously co-led the BHP Comics project, Full Colour, a mentoring programme for 14 – 26-year-old comics creators from Black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds. She also worked for the Glasgow Women’s Library on their museum access project, Equality in Progress, and their first women of colour showcase, the Collect:if Herland. Nyla’s MPhil thesis examined South Asian and Muslim representation in comics, focusing on Ms. Marvel. She served as chair of the Scottish Independent Comic Book Alliance Awards for three years.

February 21, 2020

Arts professionals wanted for Next Level programme

Are you a freelancer or employee working with a literature organisation in Scotland with the ambition and energy to lead?

Apply to our Next Level programme for 1-2-1 mentoring & tailored training opportunities.

We’re excited to open applications for our Next Level programme.

It’s a pilot career development programme that aims to equip two mid-career arts professionals on the path to a senior position with the intended outcome of increasing diversity within our sector.

With Next Level you’ll receive mentoring with an industry professional and training tailored to your career goals.

This first round is for one applicant and includes up to 80 contact hours (10 days) over three months from February 2020.

It’s designed for a mid-career arts professional who’s either employed by or works as a freelancer for an organisation in Scotland’s literature & languages sector.

We particularly welcome applications from those who self-identify as being from an under-represented group, for example, BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic), working class and/or disabled.

We consider mid-career to be someone with 4-6 years’ experience of working in the sector and who would not define themselves as working at senior management level.

At the end of the programme, the successful applicant will share their experience with the LAS membership either through a presentation or a written piece as part of the evaluation process.

Applications for Round 2 for the second applicant will open and take place in Summer 2020.

Eligibility:

We’re looking for participants who can demonstrate

  • The ambition and energy to lead
  • A commitment to Scotland’s literature, languages and publishing sector
  • The creativity and potential to work at a senior level.

Next Level is aimed at arts professionals working for/with an organisation within the literature & languages sector and is not open to full-time writers. You are, however, eligible to apply if you’re a writer and you also work as an arts professional within the sector. Check the full details on eligibility.

How to apply:

Download our application pack from the website and email the completed forms to Jenny Kumar on admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk with a short covering letter by the deadline.

The deadline for applications is midnight on Friday 10 January 2020.

 

November 14, 2019

Headline notes on Turning the Next Page – LAS Sector Away Day

We were delighted to welcome 65 people from all walks of literary life to our Sector Away Day in sunny Dundee on 1 October, including writers, publishers, literary agents, literature organisations, festival programmers – not to mention 10-week-old baby Sophia with mum Rachel Humphries currently on maternity leave from Moniack Mhor.

The day has been described as a fascinating, informal and welcoming and we’re very grateful to all the speakers and delegates for their contribution.

Below are the headline notes from the day, including Valentina’s excellent round-up of the key issues highlighted in the roundtable discussions.

We asked for input from delegates and LAS Members on which 3 priorities to focus on as outcomes to develop for 2020. The majority consensus is: 1) Diversity, Equality & Access; 2) Payment and 3) Climate Emergency.

Headline Notes

Morning sessions

WELCOME

LAS Chair Peggy Hughes opened the event very positively, by showing LAS’ strengths: our openness and willingness to share our knowledge, as well as our concrete actions, which she returned to later in the AGM. Through our open meetings and our current initiatives, we encourage co-operation and collaborative working. Peggy mentioned the work of ROAR in promoting gender equality, as well as our willingness to listen to our sector, diversifying and amplifying our work through meetings and with our network of writers, including our Writers’ Advisory Group represented on the day by Maisie Chan and Heather Palmer.


Director of Scottish Poetry Library Asif Khan’s reading of ‘Mary Shelley on Broughty Ferry Beach’ by Robert Crawford from Whaleback City and his discussion on Shelley showed the way in which this city has inspired “the aery flights of imagination.”

 

Literature in Dundee – Dr Erin Farley, local historian, storyteller and library worker

Erin addressed these ‘aery flights of imagination’ with aplomb in her opening address, citing how literature is part of the landscape, is social and inventive – this city, where “landscape, memory and people are intimately connected”:

  • Dundee has a vibrant literary history
  • Literature is social – citing examples of the Green H, a sign of the Hopscotch literary group meeting; Scrieve, Dundee’s new monthly playwriting scratch night; and Dostoyevsky Wannabe Cities, a snapshot of a selection of writing from one city at one time as chosen by a guest-editor (Erin Farley).
  • Literature works example of Dundonian poet, songwriter, weaver and activist Mary Brooksbank
  • Stories will always be in fashion
  • Dundee’s literature belongs to everyone and is open to everyone to participate in.

 

Keynote speaker Laura Brown – writer, editor and former Editor-in-Chief of Comics at DC Thomson

Laura’s account of her nimble career in future-proofing, through keeping abreast with the things that keep people buying magazines was inspiring:

  • Stories are what matter, whether that’s the Beano or pricey hardback fiction
  • The future is so out of date so quickly
  • Focus on what we do best: telling stories; we peddle the exteriors so the interiors can be experienced
  • Future-proofing is more about keeping the best bits of what works while adapting to tech and social change, rather than chasing fads
  • In literature you’ve got bold thinkers, you’ve got innovation
  • In terms of future-proofing, literature is already embracing new technology and new formats. You make an event out of a book. We (in magazines) have a lot to learn from you.

‘NEXT’ PRACTICE

Breakout discussion – how do we tackle key sector issues on- and off-line? Facilitated by LAS Trustees with the 6 key topics highlighted in the ‘What’s Next?’ session below.

 

Literature Talks launch: ‘On A Lifetime of Ticking Boxes’ by Chitra Ramaswamy, award-winning journalist and author.

You could hear a pin drop as Chitra read out her deeply personal and incredibly powerful essay on diversity in literature and publishing. Read it here: http://bit.ly/ChitraRamaswamy

 

Afternoon sessions

LITERATURE ALLIANCE SCOTLAND AGM

Download the AGM papers.

 

QUICK-FIRE KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE, chaired by Ali Bowden

Upcoming literary anniversaries – Daniel Cook, Head of English at University of Dundee

 

VisitScotland’s Year of Coast & Waters 2020 and Year of Scotland’s Stories 2022 – Marie Christie, Head of Development – Events Industry 

  • Opportunities for promotion, celebration, participation, collaboration and industry engagement
  • Chances to spotlight and celebrate Scotland, in all its particulars and diversity
  • See the slides here.

 

Scottish Books International – Sasha de Buyl, Manager

  • An outline of SBI’s strategic plan for activity for the next 14-month period, including aims to empower Scotland to connect with international literary ecologies
  • Core aim is to act as a connecting force for Scottish books and writing around the world
  • Three pillars of Informing, Connecting and Growth
  • The plan intends to raise awareness of Scottish books and writing overseas, connect our publishers, writers and organisations with international partners and to create an infrastructure for sustained development in the longer term.
  • Newsletter launched
  • Online opportunities page coming
  • News and blog section aimed at outward-looking writers/publishers
  • SBI website is a shop window for Scottish writing
  • The aim is to develop an international database
  • Germany is the focus for 2020 with plans for market insight seminars, inbound delegation to Germany and delegations of Scottish writers to German literary festivals with a tie-in to Scottish Book Festivals
  • Plan is to scope current knowledge via a survey with the aim of developing a road map for growth
  • See the slides here.

 

Open Book on outreach/ building networks – Marjorie Lotfi Gill, Co-Founder and Development Director 

  • Advantages of shared reading – without homework – through reading aloud together with a paired poem and then take participants to see authors at literary festivals
  • Objective and aspiration to allow lots of people to have access to a book who might not otherwise
  • Valuing of diversity in authors – allowing groups to own their own sessions from Stranraer to Eyemouth to Shetland
  • Building connections through reading workshops in prisons, healthcare, community, libraries and with people who have vision problems, who have English as a second language, with refugee women and children
  • Participants are more confident and connected at the end of the session

 

Lighthouse Bookshop on working with industry and beyond – Mairi Oliver, owner

  • The bookshop has a key role in the literary landscape
  • Sell books <–> build community
  • Bookshops are the interface between authors, publishers and readers – and performers too
  • Met young poets and people of colour through Intercultural Youth Scotland who use the space of the bookshop for their events
  • Book Fringe collaboration with Golden Hare Books
  • Link with Zines offering both artistic and literary collaborations and connections
  • Great advice: find local bookshops, meet passionate people and hold events.

 

The Scottish BAME Writers’ Network – Jeda Lewis 

  • Jeda offered to give an impromptu talk on the Network as co-founder Jay G Ying was ill
  • Advocacy role of writers of colour with a connection to Scotland
  • Creating a community and space where everything goes with no need to self-censor
  • promoting work, and making opportunities with literary events for
  • Launch of Ceremony on 15 Oct – a new pamphlet featuring 15 writers from the BAME Writers’ Group who met at Scottish Poetry Library
  • Panel at Golden Hare Books Festival on Fri 18 Oct
  • Network event on 23 November in Edinburgh

A Vision for Change – Creative Scotland

Mairi Kidd, Head of Literature, Languages & Publishing at Creative Scotland along with her team members Harriet MacMillan, Viccy Adam and Alan Bett.

  • Responsive talk on our ‘Literature Ecosystem’
  • Shared their thinking on Is literature in an ‘Equalities Emergency’ and welcome challenge on this topic
  • How do we understand and tackle barriers?
  • How do we move past diversity initiatives to sustained change?
  • Why do we (sometimes) find the discussion threatening and how can we change that?
  • Encouraging and inviting us to contribute to their work in progress
  • We need a fundamental change in the way we work together as a sector
  • What is the product of a not-for-profit sector?
  • How do we understand what value for money looks like?
  • We need to move beyond the well-intentioned outreach model, and the idea quality & diversity are separate, to make sure that benefit it given back to everyone who lives and works in Scotland.

 

WHAT’S NEXT?

Priorities from breakout discussion with Valentina Bold, LAS Co-Vice Chair

The following priorities came out of the breakout discussion in the morning session. We asked for input from delegates and LAS Members on which 3 priorities to focus on as outcomes to develop for 2020. The majority consensus was for 1) Diversity Equality & Accessibility; 2) Payment and 3) Climate emergency, including festivals.

Diversity, Equality & Accessibility (events)

  • Respect the author
  • Ensure quality of experience
  • Deploy sensitivity readers (more than once)
  • Embrace diversity but be critical
  • Need for Scottish data
  • Ensure equality in income
  • Listen and be open to those affected
  • Possibility of Citizens’ Assembly model
  • Travel grants needed
  • Sign language
  • Share resources
  • Break down hierarchies
  • Give writers time/space – a longer vision

Suggested actions:

Diversity – advocacy, support, sensitivity.

Equality –  advocacy, practice.

Accessibility –  survey LAS members, members to include accessibility info on websites, invite speaker on accessibility to next LAS meeting.

Payment

  • Reduce expectation of work for free (anthology / events)
  • Use Scottish Book Trust Live Literature rates as a starting point

Suggested actions – advocacy, show good practice, payment as the norm.

Festivals

  • Be green (keep control if poss, not always poss [venues])
  • Adopt carbon reduction plans
  • Avoid branded merchandise (often not sustainable)
  • Reduce meat/dairy
  • Support local writers
  • Involve Creative Carbon Scotland
  • Carbon off-set flights
  • Ensure diversity in programming

Suggested actions – advocacy, build knowledge

Climate emergency

Action: Consider the following

  • Travel in Scotland / international
  • Technological issues – potential for access.

Data sharing

To include:

  • Insights
  • Trends
  • Book sales
  • Tourism
  • And reservations – social media: take care with pronouns

Suggested actions: Consider how we do this already; how can we be innovative; offer social media training sessions through LAS.

Resilience

  • Need for flexibility
  • Amplifying Scottish voices
  • Open Book model – support writers in getting voices heard
  • Developing community
  • Exploring what is ‘Scottish literature’ for diverse voices & experiences (language, ethnicity)
  • Avoid no-platforming and censorship
  • Stop ideological divides

Suggested actions – next steps, future-proofing.

Thank you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 18, 2019

On A Lifetime of Ticking Boxes by Chitra Ramaswamy

We’re delighted to launch our second #LiteratureTalks commission today – an incredibly personal and powerful piece by award-winning journalist and author Chitra Ramaswamy.

The commission was launched at our Sector Away Day – Turning The Next Page: Future-Proofing our Sector at Malmaison Dundee where Chitra read her essay to a captivated audience of Scotland’s literature, languages and publishing community. You could hear a pin drop.

You can read On A Lifetime of Ticking Boxes by Chitra Ramaswamy now. Please join the conversation on Twitter using #LiteratureTalks and share using: http://bit.ly/ChitraRamaswamy

The piece was also published by The Guardian on Fri 11 October and was featured on Book Brunch’s ‘links of the day’ in their e-newsletter on Mon 14 Oct.

 

 

October 1, 2019

Scots Language Publication Grants announced

Nine new titles in Scots have been awarded funding by the Scots Language Publication Grant. Funded by the Scottish Government and administered by Scottish Book Trust, the Scots Language Publication Grant was created by the Scots Language Resource Network to support Scots publishers and to encourage Scots writers.

Applications were assessed by a panel with expertise in Scots and publishing, including a writer and representatives from Creative Scotland, Education Scotland and Publishing Scotland.

The successful titles are:

  • Burds in Scots by Hamish MacDonald (Scotland Street Press)
  • The Complete Works of William Soutar by William Soutar (Tippermuir Books)
  • Daisy On the Outer Line by Ross Sayers (Cranachan)
  • Deep Wheel Orcadia by Harry Josephine Giles (Stewed Rhubarb)
  • The Itchy Coo Book of Hans Christian Anderson by Itchy Coo (Black and White Publishing)
  • The Last Berry by Susi Briggs (Curly Tale)
  • Modern Makars by Irene Howatt, Ann Macinnon and Finola Scott (Tapsalteerie)
  • Roads to Nae Wye by Christie Williamson (Luath)
  • Wheen by Stuart Paterson (Chapman)

The Scots Language Publication Grant provides assistance for publishing new work (including translated texts), reprinting existing historical or culturally significant work, and also effective marketing and promotion of existing and new work.

 

Scots Language Resource Network

The Scots Language Publication Grant is administrated by The Scots Language Resource Network, which meets twice a year to discuss the coordination and publication of new and existing resources (online and in print) that support speakers, readers, writers, teachers, learners and students of Scots. It currently includes representatives from the following organisations:

ASLS

Creative Scotland

Education Scotland

Glasgow Women’s Library

Historic Environment Scotland

Literature Alliance Scotland

National Library of Scotland

Publishing Scotland

Scots Language Centre

Scottish Book Trust

Scottish Language Dictionaries

Scottish Poetry Library

SQA

Ulster Scots Agency

Wigtown Book Festival

Via Scottish Book Trust

July 30, 2019

Meet our new Writers’ Advisory Group

We were stunned with the volume of strong applications to our ‘writers wanted’ call-out in May, receiving more than 30 applications for just five places for published writers living and working in Scotland.

With the aim of strengthening the advice to our Board from a diverse and inclusive writing community, the Board considered a number of factors to ensure a balance and mix of voices.

The Advisory Group will meet twice a year, in the summer and the winter of 2019 and 2020. Along with Comms Officer Jenny Kumar they will discuss key issues and provide their knowledge and advice to help make sure that writers’ concerns are at the heart of our mission and strategy and reflected in our activities and advocacy work.

We pay our Writers in line with the Live Literature Funding rate, plus travel expenses.

 

Meet Our Writers’ Advisory Group

Maisie Chan is a Birmingham-born author who lives in Glasgow. She writes for children, teens and sometimes adults and has been published by Penguin and Hachette. She has taught creative writing at Arvon and for Writing West Midlands. She is a mentor and runs the Glasgow Children’s Writers Group and Bubble Tea (a facebook group for East Asian writers in the UK).
@MaisieWrites
https://www.maisiechanwrites.com

 

Sylvia Hehir writes YA fiction from her home in the West Highlands of Scotland. She is an SBT New Writer awardee, and with her extensive experience of working in a variety of educational settings, and a doctorate in Creative Writing from the University of Glasgow, Sylvia runs writing workshops for teenagers, adults and creative writing students.
@shehir853
https://sylviahehir.com

 

Pàdraig MacAoidh / Peter Mackay is a native Gaelic speaker born and brought up on the Isle of Lewis who is based in Edinburgh. He is a poet, broadcaster, journalist and a Lecturer in Literature at the University of St Andrews. Peter has worked at the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry, Queen’s University Belfast; Trinity College Dublin and University College Dublin; and at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, where he was writer in residence. He has also worked as a journalist and television news producer for the BBC.
@PadraigMacaoidh
http://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/poet/peter-mackay/

 

Heather Palmer is a Glasgow-based writer, proofreader and editor. She writes with a focus on folklore, nationalism and death. Heather is the first-ever comics winner of the SBT New Writers Award (2019) and has been shortlisted for Best Writer at the SICBA Awards in both 2017 and 2018. She has been published in We Shall Fight Until We Win, Scrieve! and Frisson’s Knock Knock.
@_HeatherAPalmer
https://heatherannepalmer.wordpress.com

 

Michael Lee Richardson is a writer, producer and community organiser from Glasgow. His short film, My Loneliness is Killing Me – directed by Tim Courtney – won a BAFTA Scotland Award (Best Short Film). Michael’s short story The Other Team appears in Stripes Publishing’s PROUD anthology, edited by Juno Dawson. With Ryan Vance, Michael ran the Queer Words Project Scotland and edited We Were Always Here for 404 Ink.
@HRFMichael
http://hrfmichael.co.uk

 

-Ends-

 

 

July 5, 2019

LAS strengthens Board with new Trustees

LAS welcomes three new Trustees to strengthen our expertise in education, Scots and strategic leadership, and to broaden our geographic representation, at executive level.

The new Trustees are:

  • Valentina Bold, Principal Knowledge Exchange Fellow at University of Strathclyde
  • Sophie Moxon, Executive Director of Edinburgh International Book Festival
  • Poet David Wheatley, Reader at University of Aberdeen

Chair of LAS Peggy Hughes said: “We’re delighted to have had great interest from the sector in joining our Board for the two positions advertised. From such strong candidates we have appointed three Trustees to broaden the Board’s voices and perspectives and we look forward to welcoming Valentina, Sophie and David at our next meeting in May. 

“With the combination of skills, knowledge and expertise in academia, education, Scots and writing they bring to the Board, we’ve no doubt our new Trustees will make a huge contribution to our vital work in championing the literature, languages and publishing sector across the whole of Scotland and beyond.”

April 27, 2018

LAS survey: have your say on Creative Scotland funding

If you’re involved in the literature, languages and publishing sector, we’d like to hear your views on Creative Scotland  – whether or not you / your organisation is funded by them.

Please complete this survey before this Friday, 23 March 2018.

It’s only 10 questions. That’s just five minutes of your time to help inform our sector feedback at a meeting with CEO Janet Archer next week.

 
Feel free to share the survey amongst your own membership and with your wider literature, languages & publishing network. Every voice matters – we want to hear them all.
 
The deadline is Friday 23 March 2018. Thank you!
March 20, 2018

Guest blog: Scottish children are reading what they want

Shelagh Toonen, Librarian at Elgin Academy, responds to an article in the national press that  ‘Scottish children are not reading challenging enough books’ (BBC News, 22 February 2018)

The report reads that we are failing our pupils in Scotland. It highlights a study which leads us to believe that we have a Scottish education system clearly heading for catastrophe. Librarians, teachers, parents, pupils, education authorities and concerned citizens have reason for alarm. There are signs of literacy failure nationwide.

However, in my own school, Elgin Academy, in 2016, 87% of our pupils left school with a literacy level of level 5 in literacy or better. This was compared with 80% of our virtual comparator.

This refutes the claim in the study that “many 16-year-olds sitting National 4 and 5 exams have the reading ability of a 13 year old or lower.”

However, the education company Renaissance Learning, Inc. has made the claim that Scottish children are not reading challenging enough books and this was reprinted in the Scottish media. Renaissance Learning’s flagship product is a software package called Accelerated Reader. The company claims that AR (as it is called) is “the world’s most widely used reading software.”

It has been established in the UK since 1999 and claims to have a presence in over 40,000 schools in more than 60 countries worldwide. Renaissance’s purpose is to accelerate reading and learning for all. A minimum subscription rate for 50 pupils is £450, or £9 per pupil. AR is, by its very nature, a system of providing extrinsic motivation and extrinsic rewards for reading. A very expensive system with very expensive rewards.

Most pupils, even those with less reading ability, quickly realise that one way to accumulate points is volume, volume, volume. Read easier books and lots of them so you can quickly take as many AR quizzes as possible with minimal challenge. This competitive race is likely to discourage weaker readers while proficient readers may find the joy and power of reading reduced to vocabulary words and computer-generated comprehension quizzes. Our young people should not be reading to achieve tangible rewards. They should read because they want to. AR gets motivation wrong. It assumes that the reason our young people don’t read is that they need to be bribed into doing so with extrinsic awards.

Bestselling YA author Judy Blume is unequivocal: “What I don’t like and what I really don’t like — intensely hate, you could say — is the Accelerated Reader program, even though many of my books are in that program, because they rate books, not on emotional content or emotional readiness. They’re rated by machine — how many words in a sentence, how long is a paragraph. Nothing to do with character, nothing to do with subject and again, nothing to do with emotional readiness.”

Our pupils in Scottish schools read because their school librarian selected and recommended a book they thought they would enjoy based on knowing them and on their interests. Our pupils read to escape, to heal, to experience, to have adventures, to escape into other worlds and to dream. We provide them with the means to do that. School librarians provide a reader-friendly, safe, nurturing space with time to read and be read to and with time to select and to talk about reading. We provide access to books and, more importantly, choice. Young people are given free rein in the library, to read anything and everything they want.

Free choice is a powerful motivator in reading. For a young person, to have the opportunity to independently choose their own book, surely demonstrates their willingness and desire to read? It does not matter what that choice is. It should not be frowned upon nor the reader discouraged. Choice empowers our young people and if we value their choices, then we value them. Their choice leads to discussion, firstly about the books, but also then helps to create and to strengthen relationships. Ultimately, choice develops independent readers and learners.

If secondary school pupils do choose the same books they enjoyed in primary school, or choose to remain with one series of books, then they are reading books they have known, enjoyed and loved. If these books provide a comforting or nurturing value during what might be challenging or difficult times at secondary school, then that is a good thing. If pupils want to remain with Robert Muchamore, or Jeff Kinney or Anthony Horowitz and want to re-read the whole series, then let them.

School librarians are there to help our pupils to make choices based on their interests and to develop their enthusiasm for books. We are there to motivate and to enable our pupils to have choice in their reading. Strong and capable readers are those who read widely and diversely in a wide variety of genres and in the quest to build capable readers, promoting independent, self-selected reading remains key. Creating keen, lifelong readers doesn’t just happen. It takes a school library, with a diverse, relevant and vibrant collection of books and a professionally qualified librarian to help reach that goal.

My own proposal would be that all pupils be given the gifts of time and books they want to read throughout their school lives and that all young children would have an adult who would read aloud to them each and every day.

Parents of our pupils have a role to play in developing their reading habit and their literacy skills too. What parents do is more important than who parents are. A study involving 4000 children in the UK found parents who provided learning support at home had a positive impact on their child’s cognitive, language and socio-emotional development, regardless of the parent’s class or educational background. This can be anything from reading to their child, library visits, singing songs, reading poems or nursery rhymes.

The powerful influence of the early home learning environment was apparent in the pre-school period, and when children started school, and continued right through to the end of secondary school. Closing the gap in educational attainment between children from affluent and disadvantaged homes is a current priority of the Scottish Government.

A quality school library can contribute to reducing the attainment gap and enable vulnerable students to improve academic success. Evidence reveals the difference a school library can make at both primary level and to disadvantaged pupils who have limited access to reading resources in the home.

Nurturing my school’s reading culture gives me the opportunity to raise the profile of books and reading in school, while at the same time sharing my passion for high-interest titles, favourite authors and the joy of books.

I believe that, through independent reading and freedom of choice, our young people gain a wealth of background knowledge about many different things and they will build vocabulary, fluency and will want to read more. I want our pupils to enjoy reading and I know that school librarians’ role in creating readers is one of the most exciting and satisfying parts of our job.

Now, with changing technologies and concepts, the school library is a much more exciting place to explore than ever before. We all relish the excitement on a pupil’s face, when they come into the library, knowing that they are entering a world of creativity, adventure, learning, fun and warmth. It is a reminder every day of why our school libraries and reading are so important to our young people.

Professional library support and choice really do help to make our make young people into readers. I firmly believe that our libraries should be the beating heart of the reading culture in our schools in Scotland.

“Students will read if we give them the books, the time, and the enthusiastic encouragement to do so. If we make them wait for the one unit a year in which they are allowed to choose their own books and become readers, they may never read at all. To keep our students reading, we have to let them.”
― Donalyn Miller The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child.

This guest blog originally appeared on the CILIPS’ website. It is reproduced here with kind permission. 

March 1, 2018

LAS submission to Culture Committee re Creative Scotland funding

We have submitted the following response to the Scottish Parliament’s Culture Committee ahead of the evidence session with Creative Scotland on ‘Sustainable funding for arts and creative organisations in Scotland’ on Thursday 22 February 2018 from 9am. Meeting papers are here.

Peggy Hughes, Chair of Literature Alliance Scotland, said:

“While Literature Alliance Scotland is pleased that many strategic literature and language organisations have received regular funding from Creative Scotland, we have some concerns about the Board’s decision-making process in the final stages, which has been unclear, unaccountable and has resulted in some surprising outcomes. Specifically, we regret the loss of Edinburgh City of Literature Trust as a regularly funded organisation, and the reductions in funding for Tracs and Scottish Poetry Library.

“The Scottish Government’s positive budget announcement in December 2017 was met with both relief and optimism across the cultural sector. However, the developments that followed Creative Scotland’s initial regular funding announcement, with the subsequent series of reversals in some funding decisions, sets a worrying precedent that could indicate that not all voices and approaches are equally valued or listened to.

“We hope that the Culture Committee’s scrutiny of Creative Scotland on Thursday will provide the much-needed answers to questions about criteria, process and transparency that are being urged by us all across the cultural sector.”

 

February 20, 2018

LAS seeks new Trustees

Literature Alliance Scotland seeks to appoint two new Trustees and welcome expressions of interest from potential candidates – and particularly from those with a specialist knowledge of education, and Scots.

A description of the positions and the candidates’ qualities sought follows.

As LAS is a SCIO (Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation), the positions are unpaid, however, reasonable out of pocket expenses will be met.

If you would like to join our Board of Trustees, please send a CV and a short letter to LAS Chair Peggy Hughes on admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk telling us why you’d like to get involved and what you think you can offer.

The deadline for applications is 23 March 2018.

Information about being a Trustee for LAS

About LAS

LAS is a membership organisation, which is committed to advancing the interests of literature and languages at home and abroad. It is Scotland’s largest network for literature and languages, of more than 30 member organisations, bringing together writers, publishers, educators, librarians, literature organisations and national cultural bodies.

Our vision is that LAS is a trusted, strong collective voice for Scotland’s literature and languages, which are celebrated locally, nationally and internationally.

LAS was formed in spring 2015 as successor to the Literature Forum for Scotland, which was first set up in 2001, at the invitation of the then Literature Committee of the Scottish Arts Council. In 2006, following a review of its remit by the Scottish Arts Council, the Literature Forum was formally recognised as a national Advisory Council for Literature, and acted in this capacity. In mid-2014, Literature Forum members decided to review the organisation’s future role and to consider how it should develop to become a stronger and more inclusive voice for literature and languages in Scotland and abroad, leading to the transition in spring 2015 to Literature Alliance Scotland.

Members actively participate in leading and contributing to LAS’ main areas of work, which include championing the sector through advocacy and events, networking and sector intelligence, and professional development.

LAS’ income comes from membership fees and is supported by The National Lottery through Creative Scotland.

LAS became a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Institution (SCIO) in March 2016. Under its Constitution, LAS has a Board of Trustees headed by a Chair and Vice-Chair, elected by the members at the Annual General Meeting.

 

ROLE DESCRIPTION

Summary

The role of the Board of Trustees is to determine the overall strategic direction of LAS, monitoring progress towards our objectives and taking collective responsibility to ensure the good governance of the organisation. Our Trustees should be prepared to act as advocates.

Trustee applications are welcome from within and outwith the membership of LAS.

Main Duties

Our Trustees must perform the following functions:

Ensure the organisation complies with its constitution, charity law and any other relevant legislation or regulation.

Contribute actively to the role of the Board of Trustees in giving strategic direction to the organisation, setting and maintaining the mission, vision and values of the organisation and evaluating the organisation’s performance.

Establish policies and procedures to govern organisational activity

Ensure that the charity pursues its objectives as defined in its governing document

Ensure the effective and efficient administration of the charity and ensure its financial stability.

 

Time commitment

The LAS Board of Trustees meets four times a year. Trustees will be expected to prepare for and attend these meetings as well as our Annual General Meeting. Board meetings, which usually last around two hours, take place immediately after the Members’ meetings, which are held in Edinburgh during a working day.  One of the four meetings is held in a different part of Scotland.

 

Expenses

This is an unpaid post, however out of pocket expenses reasonably incurred in connection with carrying out the Trustees’ duties will be met.

 

Candidate Qualities

A sound knowledge of and passion for Scottish literature and languages

Familiarity with the principles and practice of leadership and management

Knowledge of the principles of corporate governance.

 

Experience

Active involvement with Scottish literature and languages in one or more fields. We would especially welcome a specialist knowledge of education, and Scots

Experience of making strategic decisions at board level

Acquaintance with leadership and management within the public sector

Familiarity with working collectively and in partnership.

 

Skills

An understanding and acceptance of the legal duties, responsibilities and liabilities of trusteeship

Financial literacy, with experience of financial management and the ability to assist with budget preparation

Strategic thinking and problem solving

Strong ambassadorial skills

Ability to work as a member of a team

Excellent spoken and written communications skills.

 

Personal Qualities

Strong commitment to the vision and objectives of Literature Alliance Scotland

Commitment to devoting the necessary time and effort to the role of trustee by preparing well for board meetings and actively contributing to them.

Good independent judgment and the ability to think creatively.

 

Other Factors

Convenient access to Edinburgh is desirable since most (but not all) meetings are held there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 15, 2018

ICYMI: Watch the #ThisIsIt2017 videos

If you didn’t make it to the Literary Cabaret 2017 on 23 November, or to watch the speakers again, here are the videos.

Please share your comments with us @LitScotland using #ThisIsIt2017.

Fiona Hyslop MSP, Scotland’s Culture Secretary opens the show.

“Words matter, writers matter…Scotland is a country of the word. You are guardians and nurturers of that word. You are creators of that word. Thank you.”

 

Francis Bickmore, Publishing Director of Canongate, on publishing:

“Novels are literally a crash-course in empathy…Books can not only make us care but they can also give us hope.”

 

Adrian Turpin, Artistic Director of Wigtown Book Festival on book festivals:

 

Pamela Tulloch, CEO of Scottish Library and Information Council on public and school libraries:

 

Award-winning poet William Letford on writers:

 

Best-selling author Louise Welsh on international perspective:

December 4, 2017

Open Letter: We hope Government will continue to recognise the value of public funding of the arts

The Editor, The Herald

The cultural sector in Scotland awaits the UK Government’s budget announcement on Wednesday this week with trepidation: a perfect storm approaches.  Stark warnings have been issued to prepare for significant financial challenges. But further cuts to the public funding that supports the arts and its infrastructure in Scotland, the bedrock of a cultural offer recognised worldwide for its quality, will undoubtedly lead to the disappearance of many irreplaceable arts organisations.

The sector in Scotland has already weathered cuts of more than a third in real terms since 2010, including a year-on-year collapse of Lottery funding, which until now has been used to shore up Creative Scotland’s core funding for theatres, galleries, venues, literature, and more.  Creative Scotland would need an increase of 48% or £22m on the 2016 budget simply to match the real-term level of 2010.  Arts Council England, by contrast, this year announced £170m in new investment to support 180 additional National Portfolio Organisations.

Core funding reductions are compounded by threats from other areas:  if Barclay Review recommendations are implemented, millions would be wiped from the budgets of arts venues across Scotland.  Culture is not a protected spend, so further cuts to Local Authority budgets will wipe out grass roots community arts activities.

We welcome the positive public statements made by the Scottish Government in acknowledging the central role culture plays across our society, and we applaud the major new investments in film and the Edinburgh Festivals, The Burrell Collection and The V&A in Dundee. Clearly, the will to support arts and culture exists at the highest level.

However, big flagship investments cannot substitute for the basic funding that our everyday, small-to-medium sized cultural groups need to exist. If these disappear, which many will if predictions about cuts to Regular Funding Organisations (RFOs) are correct, how will we nurture and sustain the highly skilled but low-paid artists who deliver arts, culture and creative experiences to audiences across every community in Scotland?

We are clear that we have now arrived at a tipping point where even a small cut to Creative Scotland’s Grant-In-Aid, alongside the reduction in Lottery funds and local authority cuts, will devastate Scotland’s arts and culture infrastructure.  Damage to this infrastructure, developed with the aid of public investment over the last fifty years, will be irreversible. This cannot be overstated.

Conversely, a very small increase in funding would allow the core infrastructure of arts and culture in Scotland to survive and to thrive.

The argument for investment is strong. The arts and culture sector is one of the most efficient and dynamic in the country. In 2015/16 RFOs attracted £109m of extra investment from sources other than public funds and created 1.62 million public participation opportunities. In 2015, 92% of adults in Scotland participated in a cultural activity and Scotland’s Creative industries contribute £4.6bn GVA to the Scottish economy, supporting 73,600 jobs. These outcomes draw from, and depend on, skills identified and developed by the arts.

We are proud to live in a country that values arts and culture for its own sake as well as for its wider societal impact on health, education, justice and communities.  Government funding is vital to this ecosystem. We write to ensure the potential impact of further cuts is fully understood, and we ask the Scottish Government to demonstrate that understanding in the Draft Budget to come.

Yours faithfully,

Seonaid Daly, Director, Scottish Contemporary Art Network

Marc Lambert, Literature Alliance Scotland

Jan-Bert van den Berg, Director, Artlink Edinburgh & Lothians

Fiona Logue, Director, Craft Scotland

Dave Watson, Head of Policy and Public Affairs, Unison

Claire Stewart, Director, Creative Edinburgh

David Francis, Director, Traditional Music Forum

Jude Henderson, Director, Federation of Scottish Theatre

David Watt, Chief Executive, Arts & Business Scotland

Janie Nicoll, former President, Scottish Artist Union

Sara Graham, CC Skills, Nations Director

Robert Livingston, Director, Regional Screen Scotland

Diana A Sykes, Director, Fife Contemporary

The letter appeared in The Herald on Tues 21 November 2017 here, and was also covered by Phil Miller online here.

 

 

November 21, 2017

LAS launches Membership Skills’ Survey

LAS is delighted to launch our Members’ Skills Survey, which aims to build a clear picture of our combined expertise and resource.

The results will be used to aid our long-term strategic planning with a view to identifying opportunities for professional development, collaboration and networking within the membership.

To maximise the value of this process we are keen that all Member and Network Associate organisations contribute.

The survey can be found here: http://bit.ly/LASskillsSurvey

The closing date is Friday 3 March 2017 with the analysis ready by the end of March 2017 to share with our membership thereafter.

Your feedback is greatly appreciated and, although it does depend on the level of detail you provide, this survey should take no more than 15 minutes to complete. Thank you!

Please contact Jenny Kumar on admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk with any questions.

February 20, 2017

LAS seeks new Chair

LAS seeks to appoint a new Chair in early 2017 and welcomes expressions of interest from potential candidates. A description of the position and the candidate qualities sought is attached below. The person appointed will have a sound knowledge of Scottish literature and languages at a local, national and international level, familiarity with the principles and practice of leadership and management and knowledge of the principles of corporate governance.

The Chair serves for a term of three years, which is renewable for a further term of three years.

As Literature Alliance Scotland is a SCIO (Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation), the position is unremunerated but expenses reasonably incurred in connection with carrying out the duties of Chair will be met.

How to Apply
If you are interested in putting your name forward for this position, please send a CV and covering letter by email to Dr Donald Smith, Vice-Chair on admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk by 31 January 2017.

Key Responsibilities

  • Advance the interests of Scottish literature and languages at a local, national and international level.
  • Fulfil a strong ambassadorial role for Scottish literature and languages in consultation with members of Literature Alliance Scotland.
  • Provide leadership to the Board of Trustees and Members of Literature Alliance Scotland and ensure that Trustees and Members fulfil their duties and responsibilities as a SCIO (Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation).

Main Duties

  • Provide leadership to the Board of Trustees and Members in setting the future strategy for Literature Alliance Scotland.
  • Ensure that the values and objectives of Literature Alliance Scotland are regularly reviewed.
  • Chair Board and Member meetings and oversee an effective administration.
  • Represent Literature Alliance Scotland and promote the organisation to government, local authorities, external partners, stakeholders and funders.

Candidate Qualities

Knowledge

  • A sound knowledge of Scottish literature and languages at a local, national and international level
  • Familiarity with the principles and practice of leadership and management
  • Knowledge of the principles of corporate governance

Experience

  • Active involvement with Scottish literature and languages in one or more fields
  • Acquaintance with leadership and management within the public sector
  • Familiarity with working collectively and in partnership

Skills

  • Strategic thinking and problem solving
  • Strong ambassadorial skills
  • Sound independent thinker and ability to think creatively
  • Ability to work as a member of a team
  • Managing finance and accounts
  • Excellent spoken and written communications skills

Personal Qualities

  • Strong commitment to the values and objectives of Literature Alliance Scotland

Other Factors

  • Convenient access to Edinburgh is desirable since most (but not all) meetings are held there.
January 10, 2017

Development meeting for overseas literature promotion set for January 2017

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LAS is set to hold a development meeting in January 2017 as part of the next steps agreed with delegates at their International Literature Summit in November 2016.

The meeting will take place on Wednesday 25 January 2017 from 12-2pm at the Saltire Society in Edinburgh and welcomes individuals and organisations with a remit in the international promotion of Scotland’s literature, languages & books.

Following consensus at the International Literature Summit for a joint service between organisations for overseas promotion, the meeting aims to work out the detail with a practical, pragmatic and focused universal approach.

Please register here

Summary notes on the Literature Summit can be read here.

December 15, 2016