A collective voice for literature and languages in Scotland

Arts professionals wanted for Next Level programme

Are you a freelancer or employee working with a literature organisation in Scotland with the ambition and energy to lead?

Apply to our Next Level programme for 1-2-1 mentoring & tailored training opportunities.

We’re excited to open applications for our Next Level programme.

It’s a pilot career development programme that aims to equip two mid-career arts professionals on the path to a senior position with the intended outcome of increasing diversity within our sector.

With Next Level you’ll receive mentoring with an industry professional and training tailored to your career goals.

This first round is for one applicant and includes up to 80 contact hours (10 days) over three months from February 2020.

It’s designed for a mid-career arts professional who’s either employed by or works as a freelancer for an organisation in Scotland’s literature & languages sector.

We particularly welcome applications from those who self-identify as being from an under-represented group, for example, BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic), working class and/or disabled.

We consider mid-career to be someone with 4-6 years’ experience of working in the sector and who would not define themselves as working at senior management level.

At the end of the programme, the successful applicant will share their experience with the LAS membership either through a presentation or a written piece as part of the evaluation process.

Applications for Round 2 for the second applicant will open and take place in Summer 2020.

Eligibility:

We’re looking for participants who can demonstrate

  • The ambition and energy to lead
  • A commitment to Scotland’s literature, languages and publishing sector
  • The creativity and potential to work at a senior level.

Next Level is aimed at arts professionals working for/with an organisation within the literature & languages sector and is not open to full-time writers. You are, however, eligible to apply if you’re a writer and you also work as an arts professional within the sector. Check the full details on eligibility.

How to apply:

Download our application pack from the website and email the completed forms to Jenny Kumar on admin@literaturealliancescotland.co.uk with a short covering letter by the deadline.

The deadline for applications is midnight on Friday 10 January 2020.

 

November 14, 2019

Scotland’s National Book Awards Shortlist Announced

The Saltire Society has announced the shortlists for the 2019 Saltire Literary Awards, as well as two brand new prizes.  This year, for the first time, the Saltire Society will be awarding a prize for Scottish Book Cover and a special Award for Lifetime Achievement.   The winners of all eleven prizes, and the Saltire Book of the Year, will be announced at a ceremony in Edinburgh on Saturday 30 November.

Widely regarded as Scotland’s national book awards, The Saltire Literary Awards recognise work across six literary categories (Fiction, Non-Fiction, Research, History, Poetry and First Book) and two publishing categories (Publisher and Emerging Publisher). The Literary Awards see the winner of each book Award receive a cash prize of £2,000 and go on to be considered for the top prize of Saltire Scottish Book of the Year, receiving a further £5,000.

The new Lifetime Achievement Award will be given to an individual who has made a meaningful creative contribution to the world of literature. With the very first Saltire Literary Awards taking place in 1937, the Society decided it was an appropriate time to recognise a body of work rather than one book, something that is not currently part of the publishing timeline.  The Lifetime Achievement Award celebrates a writers’ work in its entirety and comes with a cash prize of £2,000.

Scottish Book Cover Award celebrates the enormous talent Scotland has in book production and design.  This Award and its recipient will exemplify creativity and the relationship between the designer, the publisher and author.  The shortlist for this Award will be announced in early November.

Sarah Mason, Programme Director at the Saltire Society, said:

“We are proud of the fact that the Saltire Literary Awards shortlists celebrate the diversity, quality and richness of books to come from Scotland over the past year. The Saltire Literary Awards have a proud history of celebrating and bringing wider attention to excellence and we congratulate the writers and publishers who have been shortlisted this year. With the introduction of the Book Cover Award and the Lifetime Achievement Award, we believe Scotland’s National Book Awards truly celebrate Scotland’s literary landscape. We look forward to celebrating our shortlistees and winners on St Andrew’s Day at our largest celebration ever.

The Awards have had an eye for early talent with internationally renowned writers including Ali Smith, AL Kennedy, Kate Clanchy, Louise Welsh and Michel Faber being some who have been celebrated by the Saltire Society for their debut books in previous years.    404 Ink, winners of the Emerging Publisher Award in 2017 are shortlisted for Publisher of the Year Award in 2019.  Submissions for the Awards this year have come from publishers across Scotland and the UK and as far afield as MIT in the USA. All entrants must be born in Scotland, live in Scotland or their books must be about Scotland.

Shortlisted books for 2019 include Threads of Life (Sceptre) by Claire Hunter in the First Book Category to Dr David Wilson’s My Life with Murderers (Little Brown) in Non-Fiction, seemingly disparate topics but both relevant to current Scottish culture.  Thee Gaelic books have made the shortlist – Còig Duilleagan na Seamraig (Five Leaves of the Shamrock) by Ruairidh MacIlleathain (published by CLÀR) in the Fiction category, Seòl Mo Bheatha (My Life Journey) by Dòmhnall Eachann Meek (also published by CLÀR) in the Non-Fiction category and the bi-lingual Ceum air cheum/Step by Step (published by Acair) in Poetry.

Kindly reproduced from Saltire Society’s website

October 29, 2019

Book Week Scotland launches 2019 programme

Scottish Book Trust has launched Book Week Scotland’s 2019 programme with comic book artist Frank Quitely of DC Comics All Star Superman and Batman and Robin fame. Book Week Scotland, the country’s biggest celebration of reading and writing, returns for its eighth year with hundreds of events taking place all over Scotland from intimate community gatherings to flagship events with well-loved authors. A special book, Blether, created from real-life stories submitted by members of the public was also unveiled.

Working with a wide range of partners, Scottish Book Trust, the national charity changing lives through reading and writing, will deliver a diverse range of events and activities, many tying in with the Year of Conversation, including the Digital Festival with free events that can be accessed online by all.

From events such as Souper Stories, Murder Mystery, Books Beer & Banter, The Blether Bus, Drag Brunch and The Human Library to an astronomy and poetry event, there really is something for everyone.

100,000 free copies of the Blether book, celebrating the theme of conversation, will be available from libraries and other community venues during Book Week Scotland. The free book can also be ordered via Scottish Book Trust’s Website, which features each and every personal story submitted by the people of Scotland. A selection of 30 stories are featured in the book, which also includes work from Still Game actor Jane McCarry; Hings author Chris McQueer, The Boxer author Nikesh Shukla and Bird Summonsauthor Leila Aboulela.

Marc Lambert, CEO of Scottish Book Trust, said: “Book Week Scotland brings people of all ages and walks of life together to share and enjoy books; it is a week of books and reading for everyone. We have an exciting range of inspiring, unusual and accessible events with a diverse mix of authors, writers and illustrators. This year we are celebrating the theme of conversation in all its forms, from a wee blether to the life-changing heart-to-heart. We hope you can join us at a local Book Week Scotland event, or online through our Digital Festival.”

Frank Quitely, Scottish comic book artist, said: “I am excited to share my journey to becoming a comic artist with young people in Glasgow. This is the sort of event I wish I had been able to attend at the start of my career, and hopefully I can share a few useful insights into entering this competitive industry.”

Mairi Kidd, Head of Literature, Languages & Publishing, Creative Scotland said: “From the Gruffalo to gardening and crime to cookery, there’s something for everyone in Book Week Scotland. There are so many ways to get involved – online or in venues across the country, from telephone boxes to local libraries, where you’ll find books in English, Gaelic, Scots and other languages as well as audio books, e-books, braille books and more. With a huge range of partners across the length and breadth of Scotland hosting an incredible programme of events, we hope the whole country has a blast blethering about books and stories.”

Pamela Tulloch, Chief Executive of The Scottish Library & Information Council (SLIC) said: “Libraries across Scotland will be joining in the Book Week Scotland celebrations, meaning everyone has the opportunity to get involved. Libraries offer the perfect place to celebrate the joy of reading and, with a range of digital resources available, people can use their local library to get involved in the Digital Festival. In keeping with the Year of Conversation, libraries are trusted spaces where people can connect with others and engage in new experiences. Get along to your local library and get involved.”

Book Week Scotland event highlights
  • Ian Rankin will launch his lost novel, Westwind, at an exclusive event with bestselling crime author, Stuart MacBride. Published for the first time in 28 years, the espionage thriller about spies, satellites and a global conspiracy of sinister surveillance, is strikingly relevant in today’s political climate. Tickets for the event, held on Saturday 23 November, 7.30pm at the Apex Hotel in Dundee, can be purchased on Eventbrite. The event will be live-streamed via Scottish Book Trust’s social media channels.
  • There will also be two special BBC Authors Lives for Book Week Scotland 2019. Nikesh Shukla will discuss his latest novel The Boxer for International Men’s Day on Tuesday, 19 November. Then on Thursday, 21 November, a celebration of the 20th birthday of The Gruffalo: Julia Donaldson’s classic tale will be read by James Robertson in Scots and Catriona Lexy Campbell in Gaelic.
  • The BBC will host a Novels That Shaped Our World event on Saturday, 23 November at The Mitchell Library in Glasgow, complementing the new three-part BBC Two TV series. BBC Arts will be asking guests to discuss the novels that have shaped their worlds, from the established classics to the popular contemporary hits, and possibly some interesting surprises. Featuring award-winning crime writer Denise Mina: information and tickets can be found on the Glasgow Life website.
  • Others holding events during Book Week Scotland include: Jack Monroe, Helen Fields, Melanie Reid, Frank Quitely, Claire Askew, Doug Johnstone, Helen Fitzgerald, Sara Sheridan, Alan Bissett, Stuart Cosgrove and Christopher Brookmyre. The full programme can be viewed here on the Book Week Scotland website.
  • Book Week Scotland’s popular Digital Festival will return for a third year, aiming to change and challenge conversation and broaden accessibility. Events include:
    • A series of podcasts curated by poet Tom Pow, tying in with the Year of Conversation. Guests include Marjorie Lotfi Gill; Catherine Simpson; Mara Menzies; David Keenan; Meghan Delahunt; James Robertson and Peter Mackay.
    • Illustrator Alex T Smith will doodle his favourite Scots words, inspired by Scottish Book Trust’s recent public vote. The winner will be revealed on Thursday, 20 November.
    • StoryMag, part of the What’s Your Story? programme, will launch its new Blether issue during Book Week. The stories have been collated from young people across Scotland.

Book Week Scotland also features a fundraising initiative, Big Book Swap, to support Scottish Book Trust. Join hundreds of schools, workplaces and community groups on Friday 22 November to swap books and raise money to help Scottish Book Trust to continue to support people in Scotland to reach their potential through reading and writing. To sign up and receive your free fundraising guide, visit Big Book Swap.

View the Book Week Scotland 2019 programme

Press release reproduced from Creative Scotland website.

October 23, 2019

New Trustees wanted for Edinburgh City of Literature Trust

Are you interested in being part of the leadership of the City of Literature and supporting the creation of a Literature House for Scotland in Edinburgh? 

Edinburgh City of Literature Trust is looking to appoint three new enthusiastic Board members with particular experience in one or more of the following: Scottish charity law, publishing, delivering major capital projects, and academia.

The Trust wants its Board and programme of work to have a broad representation and welcomes applications from across all communities.

Credit: cityofliterature.com

The aim is for new appointees, once approved, to formally take up their post from December 2019, for a period of up to three years. The posts are not remunerated but some expenses are covered as per the organisation’s Board Members’ Expenses Policy.

Application Information

The Trustee Information Pack contains information about the role, requirements and the application process. Please download this pack from the website or contact ali@cityofliterature.com.

For information about the Trust and the Board please visit the website.

Application Deadline: 5pm on Friday 1 November 2019.

October 11, 2019

Joy Hendry honoured in 2019 Outstanding Women of Scotland

We’re delighted that our friend and member Joy Hendry, Editor of Chapman is honoured in this year’s ‘Outstanding Women of Scotland’, which saw ten women from the fields of the arts, culture, politics, activism and science honoured and inducted into the esteemed Saltire Society ‘Outstanding Women of Scotland’ community at a special event as part of the Women of the World, Perth.

Joy Hendry said: “This is a huge honour. I came through an educational system which would have you believe that Scotland has no great literature. I learned from my contemporary writers that we were cheated from our birthright. I used a small magazine to help put that right.

“I am honoured to be here and hope to spend the rest of my life living up to the honour.”

Photo copyright Graham Clark.

The full list of the ten inductees are:

Professor Jill Belch, Professor of Vascular Medicine Ninewells Hospital and Medical School Dundee,

Professor Margaret Bennett, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, Glasgow

Jackie Brierton MBE, CEO of GrowBiz

Fiona Dalgetty, Ceannard / Chief Executive, Fèis Rois

Joy Hendry, Editor of Chapman

Celia Hodson, Founder of Hey Girls:

Louise Macdonald OBE, Chief Executive Young Scot:

Zakia Moulaoui, Founder & CEO at Invisible Cities

Emma Ritch, Executive Director of Engender

Heather Stewart, Creative Director, British Film Institute

Since it began in 2015, the ‘Outstanding Women of Scotland’ induction has recognised and celebrated Scottish women from all walks of life and the inspiration their achievements set for the next generation. Each year, the campaign invites members of the public to nominate living contemporary examples of Scottish women who have made a significant contribution to Scottish culture and society for induction into the Outstanding Women of Scotland community. Past inductees have included singer-songwriter and activist Annie Lennox, bestselling author J.K. Rowling and First Minister Nicola Sturgeon. 2020 is planned to be the year that Saltire brings together its 40 inductees in a mentoring strategy to support and further inspire Scotland’s young people.

Taking place as part of the Women of the World Perth celebration, the special ceremony saw each inductee with a limited edition print from artist and illustrator Natasha Russell https://www.natasharussell.com/

Speaking on behalf of the Saltire Society, Director Sarah Mason said:

We are excited to be building the Outstanding Women of Scotland community again in 2019 and having the opportunity to celebrate these amazing women and the work they do to make Scotland and further afield a better place to live, work and play.  Without these women, Scotland would be a darker place and we are privileged to be able to take this moment to celebrate and thank them.

As well as recognising these women for their contribution, the Outstanding Women of Scotland Community is creating a tangible list of women who can, will and do inspire generations to come.

October 9, 2019

Festival celebrates Scotland and the Arctic

A rich mix of film, performance stories, poetry, talks, exhibitions, 40,000 Barnacle Geese and much more across two-weeks

Two weeks of events are about to get underway which explore Scotland’s remarkable relationship with the Arctic and the threat to the region from climate change.

Scotland and the Arctic: A Conversation runs from 8 to 20 October and involves a wide range of inspiring activities in and around Dumfries.

Photo: Coulson & Tennant

The festival, which considers narrative, history, representation (visual and literary), environment and ecology and artistic engagement between Scotland and the Arctic, is being organised in partnership with the Scottish International Storytelling Festival, Moat Brae National Centre for Children’s Literature and Storytelling, Glasgow University School of Inter-Disciplinary Studies, Dumfries, WWT Caerlaverock Wetlands Centre, Robert Burns Film Theatre, Cample Line and Highlight Arts.

It follows hot on the heels of the Scottish Government’s publication of Arctic Connections – Scotland’s Arctic Policy Framework.

The festival will be the largest event organised by A Year of Conversation 2019, whose Creative Director is Dumfries poet Tom Pow, and it coincides with the annual migration of Barnacle Geese from the Arctic to south west Scotland.

Co-presented with The Scottish International Storytelling Festival, it will feature international storytelling at Moat Brae – the National Centre for Children’s Literature and Storytelling – where the guests will include Dawne McFarlane from Toronto and Louise Profeit-LeBlanc, an Aboriginal storyteller, cultural educator artist and writer.

Highlight Arts will be making use of the festival to gather material for their work in Greenland, home to Jessie Kleemann, Inuit poet and performer, whose performance piece The Arctic in Chaos will be one of the highlights of the fortnight.

There will also be a Wild Goose Weekend, a film festival, children’s events and a day of conversation about Scotland and the Arctic, featuring storytellers, poets, naturalists and academics, as part of Glasgow University’s marking of 20 years in Dumfries.

As part of a mini-festival of the Arctic in Film, Colin Tennant and Dr Saskia Coulson will share their photography and film of the region – and the rapid changes it is undergoing. Colin, who is from Dumfries and Galloway, has recently returned from sailing through the North West Passage.

Scotland and the Arctic will also look at how Scots have been involved with The Arctic over the centuries – sometimes as scientific explorers adding to the sum of human knowledge, at other times as whalers exploiting and endangering its wildlife. Robyn Stapleton will be singing songs about whaling as part of one key storytelling event.

Pow, who has visited the Arctic as a writer and storyteller and who has written a Radio 4 play about the famed Orcadian, John Rae (Aglooka: John Rae and the Fate of the Franklin Expedition), says: “This event is an opportunity to think about our past, present and future links with one of the most wondrous and fragile places on Earth.

“It once seemed very distant, but the inter-connections between what is happening there and its global impact bring it into greater focus.

“The history of Scotland’s relationship to the Arctic has been one of exploration and exploitation.

“The undoubted heroism of early Polar explorers, such as Dumfries-born Sir John Richardson, subject of a talk by Professor Ted Cowan, has to be seen alongside the remorseless work of the whalers from east coast ports like Dundee and Aberdeen.

“Nowadays, there are concerns of fresh exploitation of natural resources, of the effects of climate change which can be ‘read’ in the behaviours and feeding habits of the Arctic geese which land here each autumn, and of the impact of global culture on fragile ecologies.

“In short, the time has come for Scotland to re-evaluate its connections to and relationships with the Arctic.”

The all-day conversation, taking place on Saturday 19 October (hosted by GU’s School of Interdisciplinary Studies), involves Francesco Bertoldi, the Scottish Government’s Senior Policy Adviser on the strategy, as well as storytellers, artists, ecologists and academics from Scotland, Greenland, Iceland and Canada. It will explore possibilities for future dialogue.

 

– Ends –

Notes for editors

Fiona Hyslop, MSP Cabinet Secretary for Culture, Tourism and External Affairs, says in the foreword for Arctic Connections – Scotland’s Arctic Policy Framework: “At a time when the Arctic is the focus of mounting geopolitical attention, this framework puts people back at the heart of Scottish-Arctic dialogue…It is an important milestone in the journey towards consolidating Scotland’s position as a European gateway to the Arctic and establishing it as the international partner of choice for both our Arctic neighbours and other like-minded countries that are interested in working with us on addressing common challenges.”

Picture credits

  • Arctic images please credit Coulson & Tennant.
  • Other images are courtesy of the Beyond Words International Storytelling Festival.

Scotland and the Arctic programme:

For the full details see www.ayearofconversation.com 

Among the events taking place are:

  • Wednesday 2 October: Dumfries Academy, unveiling of a plaque to Sir John Richardson (1787-1865) – Surgeon, natural historian and Arctic explorer.
  • 8-12 October: Scotland and the Arctic Film Festival
  • Tuesday 8 October: Moat Brae, 6.15-7.30 pm, festival launch with opening of exhibition Polar Bears in Picture Books. By invitation.
  • Wednesday 9 October: Outside The Stove, 7-8pm. Geese Over The Town! In anticipation of Wild Goose Weekend, join us at this family event to have a gander at wild pink footed geese as they fly over the town on their migration path to the Solway Estuary.
  • Friday 11 October: RBC, 7pm Atanjarjut, The Fast Runner, the first feature film in the Inuktitut language.
  • Saturday 12 October: RBC, 7.30 pm Film, photography and creativity in the Arctic. Join Colin Tennant and Dr. Saskia Coulson to learn about their recent photography and film assignments, as they discuss the creative process, the difficulties and the urgency of documenting this important but rapidly changing environment.
  • Saturday 12th, Sunday 13th October: Wild Goose Weekend. WWT Caerlaverock Wetland Centre, Eastpark Farm, Caerlaverock, DG1 4RS. (01387 770200)
  • Friday 18th, Jessie Kleeman, Inuit poet and performance artist, Moat Brae.
  • Saturday 19th October: A Conversation about Scotland and the Arctic. Glasgow University, Rutherford McCowan, Crichton, Dumfries DG1 4ZE, 10 am-4.30pm. Speakers include Paula Williams – Curator Maps, Mountaineering and Polar Collections, the NLS; Jessie Kleeman – Greenland Inuit poet and artist; Canadian storytellers, Dawne McFarlane; Dr David Borthwick (Glasgow University Dumfries) who runs the M.Phil, ‘Reading the Environment’; Dr Natalie Welden (Glasgow University Dumfries) – expert on plastics and their impact on sea-life; Brian Morrell, Centre Manager, WWT Caerlaverock Wetland Centre and many more.
  • Saturday 19th October, Moat Brae, storytelling with Dawne McFarlane, Director of the Toronto Storytelling Festival and Louise Profeit-LeBlanc, an Aboriginal storyteller, cultural educator artist, writer, choreographer, and film script writer from the Northern Tutchone Nation, Athabaskan language spoken in northeastern Yukon in Canada. With whaling songs from winner of the BBC Young Traditional Musician of the Year, Robyn Stapleton.

 

About A Year of Conversation 2019

  • A Year of Conversation 2019 is an exciting project designed to celebrate, to initiate and to explore conversation in Scotland and beyond.
  • It has been developed in conversation with a wide range of partners within arts and community sectors. A Year of Conversation is a collaborative project designed to celebrate, initiate and to explore conversation through the arts.
  • Find out more at ayearofconversation.com

A Year of Conversation 2019 has five broad themes:

  • Translation as conversation
  • Conversation as a social good
  • Conversation as event (micro and macro)
  • Conversation within and across art forms and across borders
  • Conversation in a digital age.

 

 

 

October 1, 2019

Gaelic Books Council seeks new Director

The Gaelic Books Council is recruiting for a full-time Director.

GBC is the lead organisation with responsibility for supporting Scottish Gaelic authors and publishers, and for raising the profile and reach of Scottish Gaelic books in Scotland and internationally.

The job description is available here.

Deadline: Friday 7 September 2018.

 

August 21, 2018

Publishing Scotland International Fellowship programme 2018

Senior publishing figures from the US, Korea and Europe are set to visit Scotland in a trade mission that puts Scotland firmly on the international literary map.

The fourth International Fellowship Programme from Publishing Scotland facilitates international exchange and comprises nine invited Fellows from Germany, France, Italy, Finland, US, and includes – for the first time – a delegate from South Korea.

The group will spend a week in Scotland at the end of August meeting Scotland-based publishers, agents and writers in a varied programme of events planned across Edinburgh, Glasgow and Inverness.

The purpose of the visit is to help develop relationships between the international publishing community and the Scottish sector, facilitate rights selling and bring Scottish books to an international audience.

The Fellows will experience the Edinburgh International Book Festival and – in another first for the scheme – attend a showcase of Scottish writing hosted at University of Glasgow by best-selling author Louise Welsh who is the university’s Professor of Creative Writing.

The 2018 Fellows are:

  • Regina Kammerer, Publisher, btb Verlag, Germany
  • Raphaëlle Liebaert, Editorial Director Foreign Fiction, Editions Stock (Hachette Group), France
  • Gregory Limpens, Rights Manager, Open Books, Korea
  • Beatrice Masini, Founder/Publisher, Bompiani-Giunti Editore, Italy
  • Andrea Morstabilini, Acquisitions Editor and Rights Director, Il Saggiatore, Italy
  • Patrick Nolan, VP, Associate Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, Penguin Books, USA
  • Päivi Paappanen, Publishing Director, Like Publishing, Finland
  • Melanie Tortoroli, senior editor, WW Norton and Co, USA
  • Eva Wallbaum, Editor, Harper Collins, Germany 

The first Fellow from Korea to take part in the Programme is Gregory Limpens, the Rights Manager at Open Books, a publishing house based in Paju Book City near Seoul, which specialises in literature in translation. Originally hailing from Belgium, Mr Limpens has lived and worked in South Korea since 2005. He said:

“I’ve always wanted to attend the Edinburgh International Book Festival and am eager to learn about the Scottish publishing industry and book market. Works by Scottish authors are translated into Korean as a result of the author’s visibility on the international literary scene so Korean readers have enjoyed translations of books by Jenni Fagan, Irvine Welsh, A.J. Cronin and George MacDonald, and one of Korea’s largest publishers has recently published the first translation of Muriel Spark’s “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie.

“I’m looking forward to coming to Scotland to be inspired to add a few more Scottish authors to our own list, which already includes Iain Banks, Ali Smith and Graeme Macrae Burnet.”

Scotland-based Andrea Joyce, Rights Director of Canongate, who has been involved with the Fellowship since it was established in 2014, said: “The Fellowship enables us to punch well above our weight on the international stage. It’s been hugely beneficial to Canongate by establishing and strengthening relationships with international publishers, and we have wrapped up several major deals with Fellows over the years. A great example of the reach of the connections created through the scheme is when publisher Elena Ramirez at Planeta bought the Spanish rights to ‘The Last Night Out’ by Catherine O’Connell. Elena then recommended the book to her colleagues at Planeta Italy, Portugal and Brazil who subsequently bought the Italian, Portuguese and Brazilian rights.” 

Marion Sinclair, Chief Executive of Publishing Scotland, said: “Now more than ever, it’s vital that we maintain our international connections and ambition. The book world is fuelled by relationships that we make through bookfairs, selling rights and licensing, and the Fellowship scheme allows us to develop and deepen those relationships between the Scottish publishing industry and the rest of the world.

“In four years, we have invited 36 senior international publishers to Scotland and given our publishers, agents, and writers the chance to get to know them in a more relaxed setting. It’s all part of a wider internationalisation strand within our work and is a key way of getting more visibility for the sector here.”

The award-winning Programme from the network, trade and development body for the book publishing sector in Scotland is supported by funding from Creative Scotland and Highlands and Islands Enterprise’s XpoNorth Programme.

Alan Bett, Literature Officer at Creative Scotland, said: “By inviting these nine publishers to Scotland for their International Fellowship Programme, Publishing Scotland helps connect Scottish literature to the world. The fellowship ensures that the work of our writers will be available in different languages and sit on bookshop shelves across Europe and further afield in the US and Korea. This is only one side of a cross-pollination process though, with the other encouraging Scottish publishers to build strong commercial relationships with the Fellows and enhance their lists with international titles, therefore providing our readers access to new literary voices and stories from diverse cultures.”

Please see the Publishing Scotland website for biographies of the 2018 Fellows.

 

 

May 11, 2018

Donald Meek Award 2018 – submissions invited

The Gaelic Books Council is inviting submissions from Gaelic writers for the Donald Meek Award 2018. This award, established with financial assistance from Creative Scotland and Bòrd na Gàidhlig, aims to encourage and support new and established Gaelic writers and new Gaelic writing. Six entries were shortlisted for the Donald Meek Award 2017 and it was bestowed on Iain MacRae for his stage play, Taigh Sheonachain.

For more information and rules, see our website.

Submissions should be sent via email to rosemary@gaelicbooks.org  on or before 5pm on Friday 4th May 2018.

The shortlist will be announced early in September and the award will be presented at an evening reception in Glasgow in October 2018. The very best of luck!

Tha Comhairle nan Leabhraichean a’ sireadh thagraidhean bho sgrìobhadairean Gàidhlig airson farpais Duais Dhòmhnaill Meek 2018. Chuireadh an duais seo air chois le taic-airgid bho Alba Chruthachail agus bho Bhòrd na Gàidhlig le sùil gum misnich is gun cuidich i sgrìobhadairean Gàidhlig ùra agus stèidhichte. Chaidh sianar ainmeachadh air gèarr-liosta Duais Dhòmhnaill Meek 2017, agus chaidh am prìomh dhuais a bhuileachadh air Iain MacRath airson an dealbh-chluich, Taigh Sheonachain.

Gheibhear tuilleadh fiosrachaidh agus riaghailtean an seo.

Faodar an sgrìobhadh a chur a-steach gu h-eileagtronaigeach gurosemary@gaelicbooks.org  ro 17.00 air Dihaoine 4 Cèitean 2018. Feumar clàr-iarrtais (a gheibhear gu h-ìosal) a chur ris an tagradh. Thèid an geàrr-liosta fhoillseachadh aig toiseach na Sultaine agus thèid na duaisean a thoirt seachad aig tachartas sònraichte ann an Glaschu san Dàmhair 2018. Gur math a thèid leibh!

April 20, 2018

LAS survey: have your say on Creative Scotland funding

If you’re involved in the literature, languages and publishing sector, we’d like to hear your views on Creative Scotland  – whether or not you / your organisation is funded by them.

Please complete this survey before this Friday, 23 March 2018.

It’s only 10 questions. That’s just five minutes of your time to help inform our sector feedback at a meeting with CEO Janet Archer next week.

 
Feel free to share the survey amongst your own membership and with your wider literature, languages & publishing network. Every voice matters – we want to hear them all.
 
The deadline is Friday 23 March 2018. Thank you!
March 20, 2018

Wigtown Festival Company seeks Cultural Producer

Wigtown Festival Company (WFC) is looking to recruit a cultural producer / programme manager from April 2018.

This is an exciting opportunity to be a key member of a team delivering a variety of literary and cultural activities across south-west Scotland, including the annual Wigtown Book Festival.

The position is full-time with a salary of £25,000 and is based at our offices in Wigtown, Dumfries & Galloway.

The successful applicant will have a strong professional background in arts and literature and proven experience of delivering cultural projects, including monitoring, evaluation and reporting. A driver’s license is also required.

This is not an entry level position, though applicants with appropriate internship experience will be considered.

WFC is a charitable company limited by guarantee. Our organisation is committed to equalities, diversity and inclusion.

To register interest and for further information, including job description and application requirements, please contact Anne Barclay (anne@wigtownbookfestival.com).

Application deadline: 5pm, Friday 9 March 2018.

Interviews: week commencing Monday 19 March

Wigtown Festival Company | 11 North Main Street | Wigtown | DG8 9HN

Charity registered in Scotland. Number SC037984.

February 26, 2018

Saltire Literary Awards announced!

Congratulations to the winners – and all shortlistees – of the 2017 Saltire Literary and Publishing Awards, announced on St Andrew’s Day, Thursday 30 November 2017, at Central Hall in Edinburgh.

Border: A Journey to the Edge of Europe, looking at the borderlines that exist between countries, cultures and people was announced as the Scottish Book of the Year by the Deputy First Minister John Swinney MSP at the Saltire Literary Awards 2017. 

Describing the book, the judges noted: ‘If ever there was a book for our times, it is Border: A journey to the Edge of Europe, delves into the stories of when the lines that separate countries on the map harden once more after their Cold War thaw. It is at once timely and timeless, with Kassabova – the poet and travel writer by trade – blending skills to spin something truly magical, and sadly, entirely necessary.’

Now firmly established as Scotland’s most prestigious annual book awards, the Saltire Society Literary Awards are supported by The National Lottery through Creative Scotland and celebrate and support literary and academic excellence across six distinct categories.

The winner of each individual book award wins a £2,000 cash prize and goes forward to be considered for the Saltire Book of the Year award and an accompanying cash prize of £3,000.

Announced at the Saltire Literary awards ceremony was the winner of the 2017 Saltire Publisher of the Year Award, which went to Birlinn, who  over its 25 years of publishing, Birlinn has consistently produced interesting, important and quality books with high production values.

Only in its second year, the winner of the Saltire Emerging Publisher of the Year Award was also announced as being presented jointly to founders of indie publisher 404Ink, Laura Jones and Heather McDaid, whose dedication and innovation are changing the face of modern Scottish publishing.

Information courtesy of Saltire Society. 

December 1, 2017

#ScotBookFlood: Celebrating Scottish-Nordic Literary Links

With Book Week Scotland 2017 kicking off today, Publishing Scotland is delighted to announce ScotBookFlood. Inspired by the unique tradition of book gifting in Iceland, Jolabokaflod, ScotBookFlood will celebrate Scottish-Nordic links and encourage thoughtful book giving in the run-up to Christmas.

Jolabokaflod (which translates roughly as ‘Christmas book flood’) is the Icelandic tradition of giving books to one other on Christmas Eve and then spending the night reading. It’s such a popular custom that it is the reason why the majority of books in Iceland are sold between September and December.

ScotBookFlood reflects the recent Arctic Circle Forum in Edinburgh, at which First Minister Nicola Sturgeon emphasised the importance of continuing to forge strong relationships between Scotland and its northern neighbours. Iceland and the UK publish more books per capita than any other countries, and with more books sold in the run-up to Christmas than any other period, ScotBookFlood presents a timely opportunity to highlight dynamic Scottish-Nordic cultural connections.

Kristín Viðarsdóttir, Head of International Cooperation at Reykjavík City of Literature, comments: “Our literatures have crossed paths through the ages as have our people and our languages. We can trace our connection to the very settlement of Iceland, as many of our ancestors came here from the British Isles.”

Marion Sinclair, CEO of Publishing Scotland, says: “The vibrant publishing scene in Scotland moves into the spotlight during Book Week Scotland, and with Christmas ahead, this is a hugely busy time for publishers and bookshops. An increasing emphasis on book design and creating beautiful books these days means ScotBookFlood is an excellent opportunity to showcase books as the perfect gift.”

Duncan Furness, Senior Bookseller at Topping and Company Booksellers in St Andrews, one of Scotland’s newest bookshops, echoes this: “The gift of a book at Christmas provides much more than a diverting story or set of facts. Books contain entire worlds, and have the power to change our perception with every read and re-read. They are paper treasures which last a lifetime.”

The #ScotBookFlood digital campaign is delivered throughout Book Week Scotland (from 27 November to 3 December) via social media and the Books from Scotland website. Books from Scotland features a special ScotBookFlood issue launched today. Highlights include:

  • Interview with best-selling author Matt Haig about his new book for children Father Christmas and Me.
  • Exploring Edinburgh and Reykjavík as UNESCO Cities of Literature.
  • Exclusive Scottish gin cocktail recipe, inspired by Iceland’s volcanic outdoor pools.
  • Acclaimed author Kirsty Logan recalls sheep, wild swimming, and solitude in an article about her writing residency in rural Iceland.
  • Scottish Publishers reveal what Scottish books they will give this Christmas.
  • Extract from McSmörgåsbord: What Post-Brexit Scotland Can Learn from Our Northern Neighbours by Eberhard Bort and Lesley Riddoch.
  • Giveaways of books for adults and children.
  • Pinterest boards highlighting Scottish-Nordic literary links.

Author Kirsty Logan, who features in the ScotBookFlood campaign, remarks “I’ve always been inspired by the idea of north, and my time in Iceland strengthened and sweetened my northern heart. To say it’s a place of pure, terrifying magic is an understatement.”

This week, Books from Scotland and Publishing Scotland will ask about what Scottish books people plan to give this Christmas, or what books from Scotland people plan to read over the festive period. They invite the public to join the conversation, using hashtags #ScotBookFlood, #BookWeekScotland, and tweeting @scottishbooks.

[ENDS]

Notes for Editors

  • Publishing Scotland is the trade, network and development body for the Scottish book publishing sector. For more information visit www.publishingscotland.org and its books site www.booksfromscotland.com.
  • Book Week Scotland, a Scottish Government initiative, is the annual celebration of books and reading, facilitated by Scottish Book Trust. It runs from Monday 27 November to Sunday 3 December 2017.
  • Edinburgh was the first UNESCO City of Literature in the world. Reykjavík became the fifth UNESCO City of Literature in August 2011 and was the first non-English speaking city to join the Cities of Literature Network.
  • The Books from Scotland ScotBookFlood Issue is live at www.booksfromscotland.com/issue/scotbookflood. See alsoBooks from Scotland on Twitter (@scottishbooks) and Pinterest.
  • We are available for interview on topics relating to the ScotBookFlood campaign. Please contact Gill Tasker –gill.tasker@publishingscotland.org or call 0131 228 6866. Campaign logos and images are available on request from Gill Tasker.

 

November 27, 2017
#ScotBookFlood: Celebrating Scottish-Nordic Literary Links

The Lights Go On Again – #wordsonthestreet

Stars & Stories is an illuminated walking trail around the Canongate area of Edinburgh’s Old Town.

For the second year, Stars & Stories adds some sparkle to a winter evening walk with 24 beautiful light boxes displaying quotations which shine a light on the print and publishing history of the Canongate area.

The trail of Words on the Street stretches from the Scottish Storytelling Centre in the middle of the Royal Mile down through the Canongate to the Scottish Parliament,forming an hour long tour.

The boxes are lit between 4pm and 11pm each evening, from November until February 2018.

A map, with more information about the quotations, is available from the iCentre on Waverley Mall or for download here.

Discover the background to the quotations on the website and share your photos with @EdinCityofLit using #wordsonthestreet

Stars & Stories is supported by LitLong, the free app to explore the literary city. With thousands of book extracts pinned to locations around the city, it’s the perfect way to create your own walking trails and discover the hidden words of Edinburgh.

Information and image courtesy of Edinburgh City of Literature. 

November 10, 2017

Statement from Emergents Creatives

A statement from Emergents Creatives was released on 13 October as below:

From the 1st November 2017 our contracts with Highlands and Islands Enterprise to deliver, through Emergents, the XpoNorth Writing & Publishing and  XpoNorth Craft, Fashion & Textiles support will end.

Over the past three years we have had the great pleasure of working with some amazing businesses and wonderful creative people, it has been a privilege.

It is anticipated that support for creatives businesses will continue in some form through Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE), to keep up to date with news please sign up for the XpoNorth and HIE newsletters.

Thank you to everyone we have worked with, hopefully our paths will cross again in the future.

Peter Urpeth, Pamela Conacher & Avril Souter

Emergents Creatives Community Interest Company Ltd

October 14, 2017

National Poetry Day 2017 – Thurs 28 Sept

National Poetry Day is coming! On Thursday, 28 September, the Scottish Poetry Library (SPL) will take the lead in Scotland in promoting the UK’s annual celebration of poetry and poets.

The theme for National Poetry Day (NPD) 2017 is ‘freedom’.

In addition to providing unique resources to mark the day, the SPL is co-hosting three events and supporting the launch of BBC Scotland’s Poet in Residence.

Poets Don Paterson, Christine De Luca and Hugh McMillan will read at special events to celebrate NPD.

Award-winner Paterson will read in the unique setting of the Jupiter Artland sculpture park outside Edinburgh.

Christine De Luca will mark the end of her time as Edinburgh Makar with the publication of a collection of poems about the capital, Edinburgh: Singing the City, which she will launch at the SPL on NPD.

At the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum in Ayr, Hugh McMillan will perform his own work alongside competition winners from Alloway Primary, who have written their own poems for NPD.

National Poetry Day also marks the launch of BBC Scotland’s Poet in Residence.

Earlier this year, after an open call for submissions, BBC Scotland announced the second poet to take up the post is Stuart A. Paterson (succeeding Rachel McCrum, who held the post in 2015).

The residency, which is four months long and will conclude on Burns Night, begins with Paterson performing his own specially-written poem about ‘freedom’ to mark National Poetry Day.

The poem will incorporate a distinctive local word as part of UK-wide NPD celebrations: on that day, each of the 12 regional BBC areas will broadcast 12 poems by 12 local poets, with each poem inspired by a distinctive local word chosen through a call out for listener suggestions across the country.

The SPL is already making available resources for teachers and readers specially commissioned for 2017’s NPD.

The notes are based on six poems, all on this year’s theme of ‘freedom’, which have been turned into poem postcards.

The poems are in English, Gaelic and Scots, and are available from public libraries in Scotland for free.

The poems chosen include work by Kathleen Jamie and Julia Donaldson.

Audio and educational content – exclusive to the SPL – based on the six poems is available on our website now at http://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/connect/national-poetry-day-2017-freedom.

– ENDS –

For further information, please contact Colin Waters
T: 0131-557-2876 or 0740-052-9150. E:
colin.waters@spl.org.uk

About the Scottish Poetry Library

The Scottish Poetry Library is a unique national resource and advocate for the art of poetry. The SPL is one of three poetry libraries in the UK, but the only one to be independently constituted and housed. The SPL now has over 45,000 items and has recently completed an extensive renovation of its building. Discover more about the SPL and its work throughout Scotland and beyond on the Library’s website: http://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk

About National Poetry Day

National Poetry Day is an annual celebration that inspires people throughout the UK to enjoy, discover and share poems. Everyone is invited to join in, whether by organising events, displays, competitions or by simply posting favourite lines of poetry on social media using #nationalpoetryday. National Poetry Day was founded in 1994 by the charity Forward Arts Foundation, whose mission is to celebrate excellence in poetry and increase its audience. Discover more about NPD: https://nationalpoetryday.co.uk/

 

September 27, 2017

Wigtown Book Festival puts global & local on the same page

  • Over 250 authors will be welcomed to Scotland’s National Book Town in 2017
  • Themes include International Connections, Revolutions, Walking & Talking, Scotland’s Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology
  • New initiatives include free children’s programme on Sunday 1 October
  • Free tickets to young adult and adult events for everyone under 26

The 19th annual Wigtown Book Festival promises more than 250 events and welcomes a multitude of authors and famous names.

This year’s festival, from 22 September to 1 October 2017, includes sessions with leading Scottish authors Andrew O’Hagan and Denise Mina; from the world of sport Judy Murray and jockey Declan Murphy; politicians turned writers Roy Hattersley and Alan Johnson; TV presenter Rick Edwards, journalists Martin BellJeremy BowenGavin Esler and Bridget Kendall; and Palme d’Or-winning screenwriter Paul Laverty (I, Daniel Blake), who grew up in Wigtown and attends the festival for the first time.

The opening evening will see the launch of the Diary of a Bookseller, written by Wigtown bookshop-owner Shaun Bythell. The subject of a bidding war between publishers, the book recounts a year in the life of a secondhand bookshop owner and reads like a cross between George and Weedon Grossmith’s comic classic Diary of Nobody and TV series Black Books. It is one of three books from major publishers to be based in Wigtown and published this year.

At the heart of the 2017 event is a new international strand, World Town, which seeks to bring new voices from abroad to the festival. The programme welcomes overseas writers and commentators to discuss the German elections (24 September) and Catalan referendum (1 October). There are also sessions on the rise of France’s President Macron, the decline of US influence in the world, and how Brexit is seen by our continental neighbours.

As part of this international theme, the Upland/ Spring Fling artists’ residency, now in its 9th year, will welcome Moroccan storyteller Mehdi El Ghaly and photographer Houssain Belabbes to work with their Scottish counterparts Anne Errington and Laura Hudson Mackay. Together they will be exploring the connection between Moroccan and Celtic storytelling traditions.

Artistic director Adrian Turpin comments: “Wigtown welcomes the world. It may be a small town in a remote part of south-west Scotland, but it’s also Scotland’s national book town, visited by an increasing number of book lovers from across the globe, many of whom have chosen to make their homes here.

You don’t have to live in a city to engage with the wider world, especially now that digital technology allows us all to maintain contacts over large geographical distances. It is possible to be truly global and local. We feel that it’s especially important to look outwards at this moment in history. In particular, after the Brexit vote, on both sides of the debate there has been a new urgency to know about our European neighbours.”

Closer to home, the 2017 Wigtown Book Festival also celebrates Scotland’s Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology with Professor Sir Tom Devine. It also looks at the particular contribution that the south-west of the country has made to Scotland’s national story, from Covenanters and the Galloway Viking Hoard, to the works of historian Thomas Carlyle and engineer Thomas Telford.

Taking inspiration from the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution and the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, the 2017 festival will consider technological, social and political revolutions and the forces that drive them, through the works of among others Alec Ryrie (Protestants), Victor Sebestyen (Lenin the Dictator) and Douglas Murray (The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam).

A series of new Walking & Talking events will encourage the exchange of ideas on the hoof, with an aim to refresh the spirit and exercise mind and body. James Canton will recreate ancient Wigtownshire; author of A Book of SilenceSara Maitland, leads a silent walk; taking inspiration from poet Harry Giles, writers Robert Twigger and Jessica Fox find new ways to explore the Galloway Forest Park; while author and farmer Rosamund Young will bring to life her cult book The Secret Life of Cows on a local dairy farm.

There’s also plenty to do not centred on books. This year the festival offers film screenings in the County Buildings, a nightly theatre programme at Scotland’s smallest theatre, The Swallow, and a number of visual arts exhibitions. Music includes Stravinsky’s The Soldier’s Tale, played by Glasgow’s Auricle Ensemble and the fantastic Commoners Choir, whose songs of revolt and dissent are a central part of this year’s Revolutions theme. Wine and whisky tastings will be provided by Nikki Welch and Blair Bowman, while the festival also offers a tour of Galloway’s new gin distillery Crafty and ice-cream maker Cream o’ Galloway. Light relief is provided by comedian turned classicist Natalie Haynes, while the stand-up farmer Jim Smith gives the low-down on rural life. The legendary festival talent competition and ceilidh also return on Saturday 23 September and 30 Septemberrespectively.

Jenny Niven, Head of Literature, Languages & Publishing, Creative Scotland, said: “Congratulations to Wigtown Book Festival on another inventive programme, full of ideas and debate, with exceptional writers from Scotland and beyond. The festival is a key event in Scotland’s cultural calendar, and an important fixture for Dumfries and Galloway.”

Stuart Turner, Head of EventScotland, said: “We are delighted to be supporting Wigtown Book Festival again this year, through our Beacon Programme. Scotland is the perfect stage for cultural events and the festival is one of the most iconic literary festivals in the UK. It’s great to see that this year’s programme is as strong as ever, with household names alongside a strong regional offering. It’s also fitting that during Scotland’s Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology 2017, that the festival will be exploring the region’s past and historic contribution through an exciting programme of talks and events.”

In a packed children’s programme, Abie Longstaff invites you to check into the Superhero Hotel, Mairi Hedderwick tells us what Katie Morag did next, Tony Bonning reveals folk tales from the region, and spells abound inSylvia Bishop‘s magical bookshop world. There will be a tea party for tigers and a Mudpuddle Farm drawing session with Shoo Rayner, while Philip Ardagh explores the world of Moominvalley. Popular children’s authorsVivian French and Debi Gliori host a workshop of superheroes and monsters encouraging creative minds to devise a character and story. This year’s programme also introduces for the first time a range of free events on the final Sunday.

Children’s programmer Anne Barclay said: Our aim is to encourage our youngest festival-goers to read more books, write more stories, draw more pictures and, most importantly, have fun across the festival. We’re incredibly excited about the 2017 Children’s Festival which offers 10 days of engaging and interactive events for the whole family.”

A separate young people’s festival, WTF (Wigtown: The Festival) offers more than 25 free events programmed by young people for their peers, aged 13-25. Writers attending will include Cathy MacphailKiran Millwood HargraveHelen Grant and Brian Conaghan, winner of the Costa Children’s Book Award 2016. The young people’s programme also features advice on creating comics from Gary ChudleighAlan Grant and John McShane, inspirational spoken words with Savannah Brown, a writing masterclass from Nadine Aisha Jassat and workshops that include drawing (with illustrator Shoo Raynor), editing and ceramic design.

– ENDS –

Notes to Editors

  • Booking information – To book tickets call 01988 403222, visit in person at Number 11 North Main Street in Wigtown or buy online at www.wigtownbookfestival.com
  • Website – www.wigtownbookfestival.com
  • Dates of festival– 22 September to 1 October 2017
  • Funders– Wild Foods of Scotland, Creative Scotland, Dumfries & Galloway Council, EventScotland, The Holywood Trust, Engage, Batchworth Trust, Winifred Kennedy Trust, Mr Edward Hocknell, The Korner Family, Sir Iain Stewart, WS Wilson Charitable Trust.
  • With kind thanks– to all volunteers and local businesses who help make the festival every year.

About EventScotland

  • EventScotland is working to make Scotland the perfect stage for events. By developing an exciting portfolio of sporting and cultural events EventScotland is helping to raise Scotland’s international profile and boost the economy by attracting more visitors. For further information about EventScotland, its funding programmes and latest event news visit www.EventScotland.org. Follow EventScotland on Twitter @EventScotNews.
  • EventScotland is a team within the VisitScotland Events Directorate, the national tourism organisation which markets Scotland as a tourism destination across the world, gives support to the tourism industry and brings sustainable tourism growth to Scotland. For more information about VisitScotland see www.visitscotland.orgor for consumer information on Scotland as a visitor destination see www.visitscotland.com.

About Creative Scotland

  • Creative Scotland is the public body that supports the arts, screen and creative industries across all parts of Scotland on behalf of everyone who lives, works or visits here. It enables people and organisations to work in and experience the arts, screen and creative industries in Scotland by helping others to develop great ideas and bring them to life.  It distributes funding provided by the Scottish Government and the National Lottery.
  • For further information about Creative Scotland please visitwww.creativescotland.com.
  • Follow Creative Scotland @creativescots andwww.facebook.com/CreativeScotland

For further information and interview requests contact Matthew Shelley on 07786 704299 or Matthew@ScottishFestivalsPR.Org  

September 1, 2017

Love your Libraries? #MakeItCount

The City of Literature Trust is running a library campaign calling library lovers and users all over Edinburgh to get a card, sign up a friend, make the most of what’s on offer, and get vocal about how great libraries are.

On Monday 26 June 2017, the City of Literature Trust’s ‘Make It Count’ Library campaign will kick-off – spanning a four week period that will delve deep into the heart of Edinburgh’s libraries by featuring stories, images and conversations between librarians and writers – ending with the Trust’s pledge to take the words and support received to Edinburgh’s Councillors at the City Chambers.

Inspired by the support and enthusiasm generated by the Libraries Matter campaign run by CILIP in Scotland, the Trust was keen to carry this sentiment forward; to harness the overwhelming support and passion for Edinburgh’s local libraries and channel this into creating a tangible and noticeable drive in numbers across library services.

Edinburgh-based author Ron Butlin told the Trust:

“I find libraries even more important than ever. Being able to browse real shelves rather than merely relying on Google is a much more fruitful way of doing research, and library staff are just about the most knowledgeable people I have ever met. Libraries are the enlightened custodians of our culture…we are so very lucky to have public libraries to keep us in touch with the closest we can come to reasonable truth. Long live libraries!”

So, what are we asking library lovers to do? Just three simple things:

Get a Card – sign-up to their local library and tag #MakeItCount

Get a Book – borrow a book, ebook, CD, or DVD and share it

Get a Friend – tell friends, family and colleagues about the fantastic offers on in local libraries

As this campaign is all about the collective effort of Edinburgh’s library lovers and users, the Trust is also reaching out to organisations in the city – literary or otherwise – to get them involved by asking them to spread the message around colleagues and friends, share images online featuring library cards and library books using #MakeItCount and #LibrariesMatter, as well as starting conversations in day-to-day life about visiting and using libraries.

The campaign will run over a period of four weeks, from the 26 Jun until the 24 July, with the first three weeks being specifically targeted towards generating online engagement and conversation via social media and the campaign page on the Trust’s website: cityofliterature.com/makeitcount, when it goes live. The Trust will work with librarians, library advisors, and writers to promote the importance of Edinburgh’s libraries as not only reading spaces, but places to work, learn, and socialise.

Ali Bowden, Director of the City of Literature Trust, says: “Libraries are the beating heart of our City of Literature. They are a haven for words that inspire and entertain; places of possibility and discovery that foster a love of literature, strengthening the very foundations of our society. We know that in order to keep them open, funded, and operating as the fantastic spaces that they already are, we need to be seen to be using them.”

-ends-

NOTES TO EDITORS

City of Literature Trust
The Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature Trust is the development agency for Edinburgh as a UNESCO City of Literature. It works to bring literature to the streets of Edinburgh, involving people in the city’s literary life, bringing organisations to work together collaboratively for greater impact, and sharing Edinburgh’s literary story with the world.

cityofliterature.com
@EdinCityofLit

UNESCO City of Literature Designation
In 2004 Edinburgh was designated the world’s first UNESCO City of Literature, a permanent title celebrating Edinburgh’s status as a literary capital and pioneer in the UNESCO creative cities network, which now has 116 member cities in seven creative artforms. The concept of a City of Literature was devised in Edinburgh by the Trust’s founding members.

CILIP in Scotland
CILIPS is the leading professional body for librarians, information specialists and knowledge managers. Founded in 1908 (formerly Scottish Library Association), the organisation funds its own office in Glasgow, is registered as a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation and  is responsible for all policy, financial and operational matters relating to its internal affairs and for those professional matters solely affecting the operation, development and promotion of library and information services in Scotland.

Libraries Matter
Run by CILIPS in the lead up to the local government elections, the Libraries Matter campaign sought to influence candidates standing in local government elections by calling on those working in libraries to get involved in advocating the benefits they deliver. They asked candidates to pledge that, if elected, they would:

  1. Support public libraries and the vital contribution they make to community cohesion, social and economic wellbeing, digital skills and literacy.
  2. Support professionally staffed school libraries and recognise their value to education and the raising attainment agenda.

For further information please contact:

Rebecca Raeburn, Communications Assistant, City of Literature Trust

rebecca@cityofliterature.com or 07966 847580

cityofliterature.com

@EdinCityofLit

 

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June 26, 2017

Emergents joins LAS

We’re delighted to announce that Emergents CIC Ltd, which supports the development of writing and publishing in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, has become a Network Associate of LAS.

Emergents works to develop writing and writers with real commercial potential in the contemporary publishing, self-publishing and digital industries, and aims to assist the growth and sustainability of the publishing sector in the region.

Funded by Creative Scotland, HIE and ERDF, Emergents is a key part of HIE’s support strategy for the creative industries in the Highlands and Islands.

Peter Urpeth, Director (Writing & Publishing), will be the company’s representative for LAS and we look forward to welcoming him to the AGM in November 2017.

Follow them on Twitter @emergentwriters and on Facebook

 

April 19, 2017

Libraries Matter – help spread the word

CILIP in Scotland is running a new campaign – Libraries Matter – in the lead up to the local government election in May – and needs your help! 
 
The campaign focuses on school and public libraries and involves two main activities – contacting those standing for election and asking them to support libraries if elected and also raising the profile of the campaign’s key messages via the press and social media.
To join in with the campaign and spread the word that Libraries Matter you can:
 
1. Share the campaign details and link with any wider networks you have: http://www.cilips.org.uk/advocacy-campaigns/campaigns/libraries-matter/
 
2. Provide a quote for CILIPS’ campaign support page (these can be provided by organisations or by individuals): http://www.cilips.org.uk/advocacy-campaigns/campaigns/libraries-matter/libraries-matter-campaign-support/
 
3. Post a picture of yourself, your staff and/or members of the public you may work with holding a ‘#LibrariesMatter’ sign (download from CILIPS’ website here) and post them on Twitter or Instagram with the #LibrariesMatter hashtag.

Graeme MacRae Burnet at The Mitchell Library. Photo: Kirsty Anderson

 For further information please email Sean McNamara or call 0141 353 5637. Follow the campaign on Twitter @CILIPScotland or via the hashtag #LibrariesMatter
 
February 17, 2017

A Manifesto for Libraries

cilips logo

Literature Alliance Scotland (LAS) strongly supports the ‘Manifesto for Libraries’ produced by the Chartered Institute of Library Professionals in Scotland (CILIPS), setting out what it believes the next Scottish Government should do to support libraries.

The Manifesto has been produced as part of the ‘Scotland’s Libraries: Inspiration for the Nation’ campaign supported by a number of national organisations and high profile authors.

The Manifesto asks candidates, if they are elected, to –

  1.  Support and call for the full implementation of the National Strategy for Public Libraries in Scotland, agreed last year with the Scottish Government and COSLA including:

– Taking forward a national reading strategy with libraries at its heart

– Rolling out and sustaining the every child a library member project

– Providing high-speed wifi in all community libraries

– Rolling out a national digital skills programme with shared resources

– Developing local, regional and national partnerships to support employability

2.   Work to ensure that all learners in school and further education have on site access to full-time professional library staff.

3.   Support development of a new national strategy for school libraries which recognises their vital role in supporting pupils’ literacy and research skills.

4.   Work closely with Local Government to ensure that all libraries are fully supported.

http://www.cilips.org.uk/a-manifesto-for-libraries/

April 1, 2016
A Manifesto for Libraries

LAS Statement for CILIPS Manifesto on Libraries 2016

 

Literature Alliance Scotland has contributed the following statement to the Manifesto for Libraries, which is being drawn together by the Chartered Institute of Library Professionals in Scotland (CILIPS) in advance of the Scottish Parliament Election in May 2016.

‘Literature Alliance Scotland firmly believes that libraries and librarians offer the most democratic means of providing citizens with access to knowledge, and that one of libraries’ most essential roles is acting as the nexus between writers and the public, placing literature at the heart of every community, accessible to every citizen.  Publishers perform an essential role in this process. Literature Alliance Scotland strongly wishes to see Scottish books in all of Scotland’s languages acquired consistently by public and school libraries across the country, so that people have access to the best of their national literature at all stages of life.  We believe that this is an opportune time for a fresh consideration of how this can be accomplished because of the coincidence of the recent Creative Scotland literature review, the recent national strategy for public libraries in Scotland and the development of, for example, Scottish Studies within the national Curriculum for Excellence.’

February 29, 2016
LAS Statement for CILIPS Manifesto on Libraries 2016